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As in other math courses, the students are given a chance to develop powers of logical thinking. Page 23 Thefunction ofthe kidney is one ofthe topics answered in physiology. Karen Rydman explains the structure ofthe organ while Theresa Kurek indicates its location.

Page 24 Exploring the World Through Science Part ofthe general science course is devoted to projects re- quiring research. Explaining hertoloic, " TheArnerican Saddle- b7'6d'Q Denise DeShetler discusses the characteristics ofthe horse and how it is trainedfor riding. The exhibition catches the interest ofClernentDornbr0wskL farnesfagodzinshifanice Olehsiah.

Biology is a key enablingstudents to open the door to many new and interesting helds. Bac- teriology is one ofthese keys to knowledge. Future scientists learn about the effects of bacteria hom cultures of these rnicro-organisms. Page 25 Familiar to physi'cs students are the proper- ties of matter and energy in the fields of mechanics and acousti'cs. Thomas Koral- ewski and Edward ,Mozoka establish the equilibrium ofthe focus applied to the ap- paratus while fohn Woll records the results.

T he principles demonstrated may be utilized in many mechanicall7? Page 26 of Science Physicalscience is a basic course thatshows the z'nterrelation ofphysics, chemistry, geol- ogy, astronomy and meteorology. In the held of physics, john Kepus explains the concave lens and virtual image to Eileen Dillon, Patricia Walasinshi ana' Ma ry Olcgah. While fohn McHugh checks a reference, Christopher Hunter waits to ex- plain convex lenses ana' the real image to the group.

Theoretical knowledge is tested by practical application in the chemistry laboratory. Thro ugh experiments, stualentchemzsts learn about elements, their properties, structure and reactions. Determinz'ng the gram-mole- cular weight ofa compound is Mary Hawr- hins, Dennis Marsh weighs copperjilings while Kathleen 0'L0ughlin lights theBunson burner. At Albin Marczalds nod of ap- proval Mary Seitz adds suhfur to the copper filings. Page 27 To spark the fre ofinterest in American and English authors, panel discussions are incorporated into the sophomore English classes.

Whether the author is Poe, Kipling, Sandburg, Shakespeare or Tennyson, he will find an enthusiastic welcome Hom these students. Page 28 "Friends, Romans, Countrymen, lend me your ears! Richard's students, finds that golden tongued oratory is mastered onbl with prac- ti'ce. The class is publicspeaking is but one ofthe courses included under the general heading of language arts. To complete the requirements in English, seniors may elect journalism, composition, or Survey ofEnglish Lit- erature.

These students have chosen the latter. Pope's Rape of the Lock is given a modern touch by Patrick Rajjergz as he snips a lock oflorraine Kotlewski's hair. Carobfn fasinski andfohn Gardnerplay omber, the card game described in the same play. Note cards, references, footnotes and bibliographies for their research papers keepjuniors running around in circles.

English Encourages Creativity Page 29 History Record Mon' Progress Modern history classes review the conditions of the worldfrorn its beginnings to the pres- ent day. Donald Wilczynshi stresses his idea by szgnwiiig the area in question. Page 30 Economics concentrates on thosefacts andconcepts which will give, young people a sound understanding ofthe econoinic system within which they live. Discussing agraph showing the dijkrent percentage rates on loans are Thomas Meelzczii, foyce Olehsiak and David Sadowshi.

Showing how struggling countries havefoughtfor existence and have developed in the midst of wars and strk is a function of the modern history classes. Watching while various countries are pointed out are. Michelle Bresnahan, Kenneth lllarciniah, and Patricia Cunselinan. VationalProblen1s, a course tal-zen f.

V The earbf civilizations ofthe worldand their contributions to rnanlcinans growth are anahzzed in ancient history classes. The purpose offlinerican History is to encourage young people to know their countiy better so that they love it more andserve it with devotion and honor.

Page 3 1 Besides regular classroom instruction, Latin students are given the opportunigl to perfect theirfluency by answering questions recorded ona tape. Operating the tape recorder is Ronald Langenderfer. Page 32 Veni Vicli Vici Students are oferea' a three-year course in German during which they learn allphases ofgrarnman increase their vocabulary, and develop conversational fluency. Die Madchen and diejungen plan a skating party. Linguists Become Proficient In Romance Central students are omered an intensive three-year course in French conversation, pronunciation, gramman and history.

Victoria Crachek and Patricia Operacz check a point in French gramman while Barbara Martz'n, Ernestfacob, and Christopher Binkert make use ofa tape recorder to perfect their pronunciation. Page 34 La nguages Parlez-vous Francdis? French students were given the opportunigz to write and interpret Dichen's "A Christmas Carol" in French.

Sandra Klosowski and Thomas Duck put vocabulary to good use by ordering Spanish delicacies from waiter Michael Hartranh Page 35 Art which may be dejined as skillinperfzrmanee acquired by experience and observation, includes not onbz intensive work in painting and sculbture but also a study of handmade pottery, like the vase being examined by Barbara Howe.

In connection with interior decorating, Bonnie Batesole and Linda Schultz discuss fabric, textures, and design. Girls, ofered a comprehensive fouryear course in art are instructed in clay modeling and sculb- ture. Freshmen andsopho- rnores are introduced to sl-fetching, let- tering, and the principles ofcolor and design.

In thejunior and senioryears, application of th ese principles zs stressed and opportunities areprovided for individual expression. Second year typing students aim for a perfect speed of 60, as Sandra Malz'n and Karen Smolinski indicate.

Students learn how to do special ojfce practice jobs, en- abling them to be wellprepared to embark on a career in business. As the sophomores, juniors and seniors in hrst year typing class are intent on master- ing the touch system ofgfping and building up speed while maintaining accuracy, Don Boes and Sharon Baker point out the un- usual ejfect ofartzstic typ ing.

With enthusiasm, seniors in Mr. Income statements and balance sheets combine to make Bookkeeping a usefulas well as an im- portant business course. Balancing the books is one of the hardestparts ofthzs subject Seniors in omce practice class learn the funda- mental procedures of such offce machines as the Monroe Adding Machi'ne, Monroe Educatorg and various voice writing machines.

Filing, letter writing, and standard ojQ'ces procedures are taught. Th Wonderful World Of Music. Music appreciation, a study of composers, masterpieces, instruments, and music history, broadens the interest and knowledge ofstudents. M fohn's musicians appbf the principles of music theory in harmony class. Spotlight Future Homemakers One ofthe fundamental arts taught in the Home Eco- nomics class is that ofgood grooming.

Students learn the finer points ofpersonalhygiene, which aids them in becoming well-groomed young women. Working to- ward this goal is Barbara Karow brushing Patricia Cunselman's hair, while facqueline Wilczynshi gives her a manicure.

Home Economics, which acguaints girls with phases offood and nutrition, home management clothing and related arts, work simplwcation, child care, home nursing, and interior decorating, helps to prepare future homemakers and mothers. Page Img In K 1, stressing. The girls participate in volleyball calisthenics, deck ten- nis, and basketball throughout theyear. The boys gym classes stress the generalhealth, body mechanics, performance i'n skills, and body contour. During the year the boys perform many vigorous activities such as basketball touch football gymnas- tics, sohball track and helcl and calisthenics.

One ofthe routine exercises in calzsthenics is sit-ups. For it is the Chris- tian who must humanize and sanctity the social institutions to which he belongs. All his associa- tions in his classes, in his neighborhood, in his community, in his leisure time, must be developed and transformed into a pattern for progress lead- ing towards the eternal, unchangeable goal. N' zulm fzrzzfc been. Those that will hold a special place in senior memories are May Crowning and Graduation.

Also paying homage in a special way were members of the Saint john Berchmans Sanctuary Society and the girls in the living Rosary. The Varsity Clee Club led the singing of hymns and the band provided musical accompanimentl Faculty, students, and visitors assembled on the front campus paid tribute to Our Lady by joining in the rosary, hymns, and litany.

Working to make the day a success were Sr. Louis, SND, who co-ordinated activities. The point of transition for the class of '65 was evening of june 11 when we received our diplomas. At Commencement many awards were presented includ- ing the Bishop's cross for excellence in religion and monograms to outstanding seniors. We returned to our seats, diplomas in hand, no longer seniors but now alumni.

V i Graduafes of H!! Looking on are fejj' Hellrung, Student Council President, and Chris Hunten her escort Queen Patricia Reign Candidate Pat Albrecht, unaware of what Friday night will bring, appeals to the student body for votes, as her manager, Chris Hunter hopefulbf observes audiencereaction to her speech. Page 48 Preceding the speeches and appeals of queen candi- dates and managers, Central's Clee Club entertained the assembbf singing "Elnah Rock" and the all time favorite, "Mr.

In the hrs! The introduction ofthe queen candidates and their escorts climaxed a week of anxious waiting for this moment with its "Touch ofGold. Escorted by jim Zyehowicg Sue prepares to enter the Lucas Coungz Recreation hall As she is an- nounced as Central's candidate to those attending the dance, Sue walks through the aisle formed by the audience.

The site of this year's prom was changed to the newly-built Lucas County Recreation Center hall. Long hours of work- ing and planning finally took the form of reality as decorations were created and put into place. Jim Elliot's orchestra provided music to enchant the evening and to create the proper atmosphere.

Central's junior models provided the audience with the latest in prom fashions at "The Way You Look Tonight" on April 7. Donald Noble, entertains students at assemblies. In addition, their presentations provide the musical background for both the Class Play and the Oper- etta.

Membership is open to any student with the technical ability. The orchestra members compete for honors in vari- ous musical festivals throughout the year. Awards are presented to outstanding members and mono- grams to hard working graduates to complete the year.

Nobla lgfg and Mr. Gerald V. DePrisco, as- sisted by Mr. Donald Noble, performed at football games this past season. The ever-growing band en- tertains at many assemblies particularly the Christ- mas fantasy, and the band assembly. Earning a high rating at Bowling Green climaxed practice that began in the early summer. After the marching season terminates, the members are divided into an "A-Band" and "B-Band" to give concerts.

Their chief activity is the presentation of the spring concert. Page 55 Y Row I: L. McKinley, Dybala, L. Fruchey, f. Bagrowskz, B. Fumo, L. Kowalski M. Gorney, f. Neslor, T Krupp, K. Spychala, K. Kwiatkowskz, S. Krempa, N. Poole, M. Bartaldo, R Gerken, K. Row 2: C. Seguin, f Olezak, S.

Taylor, M. R Bzggs, C. Guy, IL Slewarg M. Slressen, M. Kolodziejezyk, f. Durban, L. Bass, L. Caslillo, M. Vetter, C. Row 3: R. Szychowskz, A. Siaskiewiag K. Sheroian, f. Oleksiak, L. Large, jf Kowalski, K. Wojeieehowskz, C. Wilmes, A. Kubieg B. Wernen M. Paliekz, D. Mohn D. Woytowieh, K. Wrzghi M. Bender, L.

Row I: Another Central hrs! The members for the Hrs! Nagle, K. Sehmakel Hzggins, K. Przybylskg M. Poleyn, A. Pethe, f Sartor, B. Martins, Lee, R Poirier, S. Dixon, S. Kives, R. Thomas, f Soviar, K. Cieslikowskg C. Kaminski L. Roemmele, M. Gould, A. Row 2: M. Lawniezak, M. Dunn, L. Marshall M. Callaghen C. Welch, M. Haugh, G. Oehmanck, E. Halker, K. Earl Lindsay, M. Duszynskz, M. Porthouse, L. Houck, M.

Fackelman, f McLeoaQ M. Insenga, B. Hickey, C. Scott R. MePlzillzjJs, R. Sorg, F Binkozuski K. Row 2: R Moran, K. Agosti, S. Osten B. Kibbey, B. Batey, L. Schoen- P m felt Byrai D. Row 3: D. Lzlbpen K. Wisniewski M. Collins, R. Morrin, C. Larier, T Wagner, R. Beckman, S. Row 4: D. DeWitt D. Deoer, f Skeldon, D. Bradley, D. Stevens, B. Crindle, B. Row 3: K. Bonai T Ligibel R.

Wells, T Sayers, Wezlv, H. Zibbel R. TT66bl, D. Mal- lory, A. Pineiottz, T Printke, R. Heinrning, T Neeb, M. Upham, M. Perzynskz, M. Neu- hausel, Polakovie, V Knotts. Row 4: M. Mohler, D. Nowak, R Link, A. Newton, f MeGreevy, Gram- ling, D.

Paul j. Parent L. McCartney, M. Smith, D. McDermott W Lyons, D. Not photograplzeaf' C. Binkert f. Lewandozuski S. Sitek, K. Wichowskz, R Albrecht, B. Basso, S. Borgess, M Woofl M E. Ignasiak, C. Niewz'a- domskz, K. La Scola. Row 2: M Behan, S. Gardner, S. Lechlak, R Lennex, S. Barrow, K Kozlowski B. Hegedus, C. Siwa, M. Kubzbkzl Row 3: f Wakelin, E. Samsel, S. Sminiak, W Sneider, R. Michalak, B. Kubicg Gardnen B. Rielzhe, R. Nirschl F johnson. Row 4: f Kahl R. Day, f Szychowskz, L. Bzlvsonnette, R.

Becker, K. Winningen M. Shea, T Zimmerman, D. Patrick of Heatherdowns Court House St. Baiog, S. Bohnelg Milano, M. Olczak, A. Ciehy, N Swemba, A. Cyranowskz, C. Slashiewicz, C. Szpansl-cz, M. Row 2: R Thompson, G. Hunten S. Lindsay, B. Humbert, S. Maloney, f Bonh, M. Szyperskz, R. Bellingen M Seilg B. Sprunlc, Row 3: C. Crowley, T Humphrey, f Stein, D. Petlee C. MeCary, R. Polanah YT Soehockz, M. Simon, f Stevens, T Kall-fa, C. Hunler, M. Amslulg M. Aunt Eller tries to raise the price on the box lunch in the bidding competition between fud Fry and Andrew Carnes.

Gerald DePrisco and Mrs. Roger Weiher to select it as the spring musical. Ali cried, "It's a Scandal! It's an Outrage! Laurey soon realized her true feelings for Curly and they became engaged. On their wedding night, friends wished them well by singing " Oklahoma! Curly was declared innocent and he and Laurey departed in the surrey. R AAR ,. Roger Weiher, played to enthusiastic audiences, November The orchestra, under the direction of Mr.

Donald Noble, provided musical selections during the intermission of the popular Broadway comedy. The plot revolves around the two Sherwood sisters -- Ruth, a neophyte journalist, and her sister'Eileen, an aspiring actress -- from Columbus, Ohio, who try to "make good" in New York. The girls lease a Greenwich Village basement studio. During the first few months, a variety of hilarious situations created by the neighbors upstairs, the Greek land- lord-painter, friendly Portuguese sailors, and other unusual visitors create a whirl of activity for the two heroines.

The heartwarming comedy is climaxed by the girls' decision to remain in New York rather than to return home. Never a dullmoment in theSherwoodstudio! Appopolus holds the newbi- szgned lease as a sandhog fLarry McCartneyj takes a short-cut through the studio. Eileen Sherwood fSuzanne Borgessj who makes friends The Wreck fMiheAinstutzj, Helen'shus- band observes his mother-in-law for the first time.

The Slaff also runs the addressograph. Deep i'n thought sports editor Lar- ry Montrie contemplates the posi- tioning ofa story for the next issue. To right: Page one editors take the first step in preparing the newspaper, planning a page layout. Activities center around mascot "Squeak " perched on the desk. Co-editors Mary Ellen Ignasiak and Yim Sexton eo-ordinate the workings ofallfourpages toproduce thejinzshedpaper.

Business managers Frank Grobosky, and Torn Meehan place a telephone call while ad managers Larry Nester and Clarence Cerrone Qzpe statements to send to those who purchased ads. The Centric, under the guidance of co-editors Tim Sexton, Mary Ellen Ignasiak and moderator Sister Thomas More OSU, donned a new look this year as the production process was switched to offset printing in january.

The staffwas faced with headlines, layouts and dead- lines as they rushed to bring Centralites news of the school community. Room became the center of activity as the bi-weekly deadlines grew near. This year's publications, besides sporting the tradi- tional Squeak, club, and class columns, also featured a variety of new angles in news reporting.

Guest columnists and interviews with civic leaders greeted Centralites when they delved into their papers. The Centric has carried on the tradition set by its predecessors of factual, non-biased reporting in an effort to keep all students up to date on school activities. Page 65 entripetcil Hub Cf Activity The Cenfripeial staff, under the leadership of John Gardner and Frances Hayes, fought deadlines and headlines in an attempt to present this year's annual. The staff was faced with the task of determining color, theme, and arrangement in an attempt to make this year's edition of the Ceniripeial a publication to remember.

The yearbook, financed by a patron drive which netted over S3,, advertising and student subscription drives, went to press in April. The staff hopes that the Ceniripeial will hold fond memories of this school year. The business stajfsuceessfulbz changed debits z'nt0 credits. Sharon Simms and Elaine Cuzynskzg arteditors, check final page layouts before forwarding them to the printer. The cover design was the outgrowth ofElaine's original sketch.

Page 67 In his ofice as student council president jeffrey Hellrung zls responsible for the successful completion ofeach council undertaking. Student Council Promotes Activities The Student Council acts as the voice of Central's students in co- ordinating extra-curricular activities. School projects are guided by the hard work of the directors. Serving her first year as moderator is Sr.

Johnene, SND, assisted by veteran, Mr. Tim Dever. The executive committee, consisting of student council officers, class officers, senators and commissioners, bears the responsibility for co-orclinating all school projects. Meeting each Monday, they discuss matters pertinent to school life.

This year, the Inter-Club Council, under the direction of vice-president John Woll, has been reactivated. Row I, leh to right Kathy Curto, sophomore secretary, Ron Nz'rschl senat0r,' Terri Augello, senator, janet Soviar, senaton' john Woll student council vice-president' jejj Hellrung, student councilpresident.

Row 3, janice jagodzinskz, merit,' Sue Lindsey, junior secretary, Pat Lane, junior treas- uren' Mz'ke Higgins, freshman vice-president' Carol Boyce, freshman secretary, Nancy Poole, freshman treasurer. Page 68 Leaders of the school and co-ordinators of activities, the Student Council omcers, john Woll vice-presidenl' Nancy Heil treasuren' jeff Hellrung, presidenl' and Sue Zalenskz, secretary, keep Central 's projects running ejWctiveb1. Page 69 will Up QW ilr , Lfxlnh. Bonnie Batestole willput the missal on the altar and Trudy Daley will light a fresh vigil lamp.

Under the auspices of Sr. John Berchman Sanctuary Society promotes religious vocations among the boys who act as servers. Under the guidance of Sr. Lucilla RSM, the Catholic Art Apostolate strives to raise the stand- ards of appreciation and revive true Christian art by presentation of slides and discussion of art values.

The daily care of Christ the King Chapel is the duty of members of the St. Hilda Guild, directed by Sr. Ruth Ann SND. Club dues provide ac- cessories and necessities for the chapel. Club members prepare altar in the gym for the annual retreat. Standing are Dave Lardinais and Richard Buckenmeyer. The medicine is shipped to the foreign mis- sions. Mike Fosnaugk proposes the gualijications of his favorite candidate to Karen Kirk and feanne Nalodka.

Craig LaBay and Harley Andr- zejewski express their points of view. Mary of Mercy RSM. Under the direction of Sr. Adolph SND, members of the German Club participate in activities designed to enrich their knowl- edge of German culture and geography such as attending the International Insti- tute which familiarizes members with Ger- man songs and dances.

Members are elected into the National Hon- or Society by the faculty. Students elected must have the necessary scholastic require- ments, as well as outstanding Leadership, Service and Character. The organization has used as its theme for the year, "the development of the arts for leisure.

A board of nine faculty members comprise thefaculty committee, with Mrs. Velma C. Pfeiffer act- ing as the advisor. Kathleen SND, moderates monthly French Club meetings, planned to promote a deeper interest in the people and customs of France. French club ofcers proudb di'splay French valentines designed by club mem- bers.

Chris Seibenick feels the one she selects is very appropriate to send to their friends in France. German club members conkr on the customs of the German people as de- picted in the pictures. Clarisena RSM, acquaints members with various educational fields by observing ele- mentary cl a s s r o o m procedure in area schools.

The Chemistry Club, guided by Sr. Flo- rian, OSF, supplements the student's chem- ical knowledge through the presentation of recent improvements and new theories. The Spanish Club, moderated by Sr. Highlighting the year is the Saturnalia at Christmas time and the state convention in Columbus.

The Radio Club, supervised by Sr. Tere- sita, OSF, develops interest in electronics through practical experience and provides a means to obtain a license. In order to gain valuable experience, Mary Ball takes notes on theprocess ofcalculating grades as Karoll Rowe observes one ofthe daihz procedures she will perform aher four years ofcollege preparation for the teaching profession. David Kolodziejczyk demonstrates to Radio Club members the proper way to speak into the microphone ofa short-wave radio system.

L Q if lie? Rahlh Trease and john Wozny learn the intricacies of a gyroseope, as an aid to th eir eh enzieal studies. The Romans honored the Saturn, the earth goal in thanksgiving for a bountiful harvest. Some modern Christmas customs stern from the Roman Satur- nalia. Page 75 Encouraging interest in the field of mathematics is the goal of the Math Club. Under the supervision of Sr. Teresita OSF, members took a field trip through the University of Toledo computer center, and heard many fine speakers at regularly sched- uled meetings.

Obtaining a greater knowledge of the functions of science in daily life is stressed by the Biology Club, directed by Sr. Blandina OSF. To improve the club's organization and activities, a constitution has been written and ratified by members. The basic function of the Camera Club is to develop skill in the use of the camera.

Aided by Sr. Lucilla RSM, members learn the latest methods in developing and processing photos. To acquaint themselves with the different oppor- tunities open to registered nurses, the Future Nurses of America tour area hospitals and attend lectures given by key people in the medical field. Ambrose RSM serves as moderator. Stephanie Schafer ana' Nancy Meredi'th realize the effort and hard work put into a science project in order to earn a Superior Rating.

Page 76 Alathematicianas, Ed Mowha ana' Esther Kosahowski discuss the problem of computing the area ofthe 3-Dpobzgon which john Pacer holds. Marihzn Bagdonas and Mi'ke Cyurko check me th eofe m for me Coffef fmeizwd ofeomputing the answer. Through Club Activities fay Kowalski fim Hermann, ana' fohn Falke focus their attention on Peggy LaPZante as they examine the photographic merits ofthe picture she holds. Library Club members attempt to bring students to a greater realization ofthe true value offrequent reading.

Clubs Emphasize Reading Lending a helping hand to allow librarians more time for their professional services, the Library Club members assist students in taking out and returning books. The climax of the year was the presentation of an assembly by members entitled: "Book- land Characters. For the second year member students, under the leadership of Mr. Dean Richards, attempt to bring the knowledge they gain to others following the principle of" Each one teach one.

Row 4, Dan Buehenmeyen and Tom Rawshi. The grid-men of Central won 7 of their 9 games. Their only city league defeat came with less than a minute to go against Macomber, as the Irish were finally worn down by a much heavier team. The high pointofthe season came on the after- noon of November 8, when Central's" Fighting Irishlthumped the Knights of St.

Francis, This win kept the "Irish Knight", a coveted and sought after trophy, in the hands of Central for another year. Other high points were frequent as the Irish gridders re- bounded from a poor preceeding season. The Celts also proved they were not lack- ing for defensive ability as evidenced by a victory over a tough Libbey Cowboy squad in which the defense sparkled.

In conclusion tothe successful campaign, 14 Fighting Irish merited All-City honors. Zolciak and McGurk also were honored at the annual foot- ball banquet. Zolciak was named most valuable player and jim McCurk was cited as the player with the most desire.

Daugherty stressed the value of football as a means of acquiring team- work, sacrifice, and discipline and stated, "The greatest value of competitive activity is the learning of the value to excel. Coachfim Cordiak and second squad watch anxiousbz from sidelines. Brown: E. Cazula' T Krzyrninskg' R. Flores: K. Millen' M. Braung Yf Bz'rz'e,' R. Nix,' Niezgoda,' D. Mowka: R. Arbing- en' M. Blankg C. Murphygf Daouslgf Palicki. Row 3: Mr. Hzghg T Leopolaff Koralewskzg' R.

Napz'erala,' D. McCormick: B. Krall' R. Lawrenceg B. Hockrnang R. Mahoney: T Gramlingg C. Drennang G. Bolling R. Tobianskzg' B. Bolback: D. Peterg' C. Frankowskzg' G. Wasielewskif Conling M Zoltanskzy M. Bolling f McKenzie' M. Boklanaf B. Wiener f Kozlowski' Yf Novak.

Row 3: R Tanseyg R. Minon' D. Marlin: M Miller: L. Caroolsg B. Myers: D. Pettea' R. Langen- derfer. Row 4: Y. Horne, M Meeks: B. Smiikg D. Paul' B. DeVanna,' R. Skeahan: W Karmol' Gagnei' B. Beeklerg' G. Row 4: fohn Newman fMGR. Mike Murrzezz clairn the twine ahcr victory Central over Si. McGurh, f. Haiey, D. Zolciak, M. Murncrz, j. Kozlowski Yi Schick, P foyce, f Sczychowshz f. Gintcr, S. Shay, T Boardman. Coaches: Mr. Don Lewis, Mr. S J - i -W'-0 faakay.

James Zak Page 96 Mr. Dever has again proven an invalu- able aid to Central Catholic's sports program. Acting in his official post as Athletic Director, Mr. Dever is the one person most responsible forthe dynamic spirit characteristic of Central's teams and student body.

This first year ashead coach ofthe Fight- ing Irish grid team has been most satis- factory for Mr. Under his guidance the team, one ofthelightest in the city, compiled a record and took second place in the City League. Cordiak is also the boys' Physiology teacher. Zak, another first-year man, has won his place on Central's athletic staff.

He is the head golf coach and he assist- ed Mr. Cordiak with the football team and Mr. Lewis with the Varsity Basket- ball team. Zak is also a Physical Education teacher. Donald Lewis is well-known around Central. He has been a coach at CCHS for five years.

He made his debut as a backfield coach for the football team and has spent the past two seasons as head basketball coach. Lewis is also one of Central's Government teachers. Donald Lewis Mr. Joseph Wesfenkirchner Now in his third year ofcoaching varsity football at Central, Mr. Westenkirchner has compiled an admirable record. The ex-pro, a former player with the Los Angeles Rams, is head coach of the base- ball team and assistant line coach and trainer for the gridiron team.

Peter Benedict Mr, Piloseno has been on Central's faculty since , coaching the wrestling team to numerous cham- pionships and piloting the success- ful bowling team. This year's wrestling team captured third place in the state tourney and the bowl- ing team took the first place tro- phy in both divisions ofthe city league.

Daniel Piloseno Mr. Gajdostik is a man of many duties. This year he coached the cross country team and took charge of the school book- store. He also keeps his regular duties as a history teacher. Benedict is now completing his second year on the Irish coaching staff.

The assist- ant football and basketball coach is a grad- uate and two-year letter man ofthe Univer- sity of Toledo, class of He teaches boys' Physical Education. Dennis Galaydu In Mr. Galayda's first year at Central he has taken charge of the track team and has high hopes for this year's cindermen. He was an assistant football coach under Mr. Galayda is also an instructor in history.

Daniel Pilosizzo. Page 98 Plzz'! MeCartney in aelion on the mats. Daniel Piloseno gives Ed R0- nzito a word of encouragement, Tom fazwieekzgrapples forposiiion. Row 5: Richard Knzghzl David! Row 2: ffm Matuzak, Pau! Row Mike Horne, Bi!! Row 4: Fm Renaraf Pki! Francis High School, March On March 10, Mr. Tim Dever, athletic director, presented letters to participants of at least six matches during league play. The helmsman guiding the champion "wood pushers" is Fr.

Jude Rochford,who has coached Central's Chess teams since Page Lej? The GAL aims to develop the qualities of sportsmanship and athletic ability in girls, just as the varsity sports do for the boys. The program includes lessons in tumbling, balance beam, table tennis, shufileboard, basketball, and soccer in the first semester.

During the second semester the girls participate in modern dancing, volleyball, archery, softball and relays. Cooley, who has passed away; Mrs. Sarah McFarlane, of Brownsville. In a splendid granite shaft fourteen feet tall was erected by Captain Blakeley's surviving children to the memory of their father at Main and Blakeley avenues, the original site of his claim.

When the shaft was dedicated "Peggy" Chessman, the thirteen-year-old daughter of Mr. Merle Chess-man of Astoria, delivered the following address of presentation: "Mr. Mayor and friends: I have come here as the great-great-granddaughter of Captain and Mrs. James Blakeley, in whose memory this monument has been erected. It was placed here by their children to stand as a lasting tribute of love and honor to their parents, who settled on this spot when Oregon was almost a virgin wilderness and who made it their home for more than half a century.

In a broader sense, it is dedicated to all those early-day pioneers, of whom Captain and Mrs. Blakeley were typical; those pathfinders who blazed the trail to Oregon, enduring the hazards and hardships of frontier life while they builded the foundations of the state, and the fruits of whose labors we of later generations enjoy. Mayor, as a representative of the city of Brownsville, a deed to the monument and the plot of ground upon which it stands, that the people of this historic town may have and hold it as theirs forever.

It represents an expression of one of the fundamental principles of American citizenship. The great nations of the past have risen in prominence and influence, flourished for a period and passed into a decline. The beginning of this decline may invariably be traced to the loss of the patriotic spirit that predominated during the period of the nation's ascendancy. Just as long as expressions of this nature are in evidence we may rest assured that the spark of patriotism that in times of national peril has been the impelling force to call to the defense of the native land the flower of our sturdy manhood, needs but the call of necessity to fan to the flame that has assembled the mighty armies that have decisively repelled the invader, overwhelmingly put down internal opposition and emerged in triumph from an effort to end a struggle in which civilization itself was threatened.

During the course of years it had grown and developed, attaining the fullness of its sturdiness and splendor. In the strength of its fiber it withstood the storms of the succeeding seasons. In its allotted time strength declined; this, the peer of the forest, bowed before the grim reaper, and the spot upon which it had stood gave no evidence of a former greatness. During the period of its strength and vigor, in accordance with nature's plan, acorns had fallen from its branches, and in passing, the sturdy oak left behind a young and vigorous forest that gave mute testimony that a predecessor had fulfilled its destiny.

The power of this republic does not lie in the accomplishment of a few supermen, but rather in the steadfastness, loyalty and patriotism of the men and women who take up the every-day tasks of existence. Blakeley obtained his rudimentary instruction and was next a pupil in the public schools of Brownsville.

He attended Albany College for a year and for three years was a student at the Oregon Agricultural College in Corvallis. Entering the educational field, he became a teacher in the public schools of Brownsville and was made principal, filling the position for three years. For six years he represented the firm in that capacity and then went to Canada, spending a year in Victoria, British Columbia. In he returned to Oregon, locating at The Dalles, and in May of that year entered the employ of R.

Hood, a local druggist. In January, , Mr. Blakeley purchased the business, of which he has since been the owner. He carries a full line of drugs and medical supplies and the filling of prescriptions is one of the chief features of his establishment, which is not a cafeteria and soda fountain pharmacy.

It is known as the Rexall Drug Store, whose trade exceeds the boundaries of the city, extending into the surrounding country. Enterprising, efficient and thoroughly reliable, Mr. Blakeley has won and retained a position of leadership in local drug circles and is also an astute financier. In he aided in organizing the Wasco County Bank and was elected president of the institution, which is capitalized at one hundred thousand dollars and occupies an imposing building on East Second street.

Blakeley is likewise a successful fruit grower and has a valuable cherry orchard of thirty acres. The ranch is located near The Dalles and irrigated with water from the city. Blakeley was married January 29, , to Miss Mary T. The family went to San Francisco, California, by the water route, making the voyage around Cape Horn, and in came to Oregon.

For an extended period Mr. Gorman was engaged in the transfer business in Portland and his demise occurred in the Rose City in , when he had reached the advanced age of ninety-seven years. Of the children born to Mr. Gorman, two are now living: Mrs. Blakeley, and Mrs. Margaret Ordahl, a resident of Portland.

As one of the councilmen of The Dalles, Mr. Blakeley was instrumental in securing for the municipality needed reforms and improvements and is always ready to serve his community to the extent of his ability. When he became county judge of Wasco and Hood River counties the public funds were depleted and there was an indebtedness of two hundred thousand dollars.

For eight years he was the incumbent of the office and during that period removed this burden of debt from the counties without increasing the taxation. During the World war he was chairman for four years of the committee in charge of the Red Cross activities in Wasco, Sherman, Wheeler and Gilliam counties and succeeded in raising a large amount of money for the organization. Blakeley joined the Masonic order, with which his father was also affiliated, and has attained the thirty-second degree in the Scottish Rite Consistory.

He is a past master of the blue lodge, past high priest of the chapter and past eminent commander of the commandery. For a year Mr. Blakeley was the executive head of the Rexall Club, an international association, which draws its members from the United States, Canada and Great Britain. He was the first president of the club elected west of the Rockies and on his retirement from the office in was presented with a handsome watch, suitably inscribed, as a testimonial of appreciation of his services.

Blakeley was the second president of the Oregon Pharmaceutical Association and served for fifteen years on the state board of pharmacy. In addition to his attractive residence in The Dalles, he has a fine home at Seaside, where he spends a portion of each summer, and is one of the disciples of Izaak Walton.

He is also a devotee of golf and an expert player. Worthy motives and high principles have actuated Mr. Blakeley at all points in his career and throughout eastern Oregon he is admired and respected. Blakeney, who was among the first settlers of Wasco county, performed his full part in the drama of early civilization here, and to a marked degree commanded the confidence and respect of his fellowmen.

He was there reared and educated and in the early '40s went to Illinois, where he engaged in farming. In he sold out there and, with a good outfit, including ox teams and covered wagons, started on the long journey across the plains to Oregon. The party was well provisioned at the start, but, owing to their generosity in sharing their food with other less fortunate than themselves, ran short and Mr.

Blakeney paid as much as a dollar each for biscuits for himself and family. They arrived in Oregon in the late fall of , and proceeded on to Cowlitz county, Washington, where he took up a homestead. They lived there until , when he sold out and came to The Dalles, Oregon, bringing the furniture and household goods, as well as twenty-five head of cattle, on a scow from the Cowlitz river to the lower Cascades. They transported their stuff above the Cascades and there took a steamer to The Dalles.

For several years Mr. Blakeney ran a pack train from The Dalles to the mines in eastern Oregon, in which he met with success, and later established a livery stable and draying business in The Dalles, which he conducted to the time of his death, February 20, His wife died in In December, , in Illinois, Mr. Blakeney was married to Miss Nancy Phelps, who was born in Danville, Vermillion county, Illinois, September 8, , and they became the parents of six children, namely: Hugh T.

Blakeney was a man of sterling character, energetic methods and sound judgment and during his active career took a deep interest in the progress and development of his city and community. Emma J. Blakeney was educated in the public schools at The Dalles and remained at home until her marriage, June 21, , to William T. McClure, who was born in Missouri, April 18, He came to Wasco county with his family in an early day and as soon as old enough took up a preemption claim of one hundred and sixty acres, about four and a half miles east of Mosier.

His father and brother also took claims in the same district and were the second family to settle in that locality. McClure's land was partly covered with oak grubs, which he cleared off and, after building a good house, he engaged in farming, raising grain, hay, cattle and horses.

He was successful in his operations and later bought sixty additional acres, a part of the Nathan Morris donation claim. This was good bottom land and on it he raised bountiful crops of alfalfa and potatoes, as well as asparagus. He was energetic and progressive in his methods and devoted himself closely to the operation of the farm to the time of his death, on March 13, To Mr. McClure were born six children: Mrs. Josephine Evans, who lives in Portland, Oregon, and is the mother of four children, Mrs.

Mabel Miller, Mrs. Blanche Durham, Robert M. Jessie A. Pearl Ellis, of Portland. McClure was a Mason and was a man of fine public spirit, taking an active interest in everything affecting the welfare of his community. He was particularly interested in educational matters and served for many years either as clerk or a member of the school board. William T. McClure, Jr. He raises good crops of hay and grain and potatoes, has three acres in asparagus, and also has a nice herd of dairy cows, a number of hogs and a large number of chickens.

The McClure homestead, which is located midway between Hood River and The Dalles, on the famous Columbia River highway, is finely situated, commanding a magnificent view of the majestic river, and is regarded as one of the best farms in this section of the valley. McClure and his mother are kindly and hospitable, give their earnest support to all local interests of value to the locality, and throughout the community are held in the highest esteem.

Clarke Publishing Company - ] Bolton, Grifford Virgil An interesting story of earnest endeavor, intelligently directed, constitutes the life record of Grifford Virgil Bolton, who was for many years actively and prominently associated with banking interests of The Dalles. Moreover, he was a native son of Oregon and throughout his life was a supporter of all the well devised plans and measures for the upbuilding of his city and state.

Both were natives of Virginia and representatives of old families of that state. At an early day they journeyed westward to become residents of Oregon and took up their abode on a farm in the vicinity of The Dalles on Fifteen Mile creek, where occurred the birth of their son Virgil.

He first served in a clerical capacity but bent every energy toward acquainting himself with the banking business in principle and detail and his thoroughness, his industry and loyalty won him promotions from time to time until he soon became cashier and one of the chief executive officers of the institution. He continued to hold that position until his death, which occurred on the 7th of March, , when he was but thirty-two years of age.

Although he passed away at a comparatively early age he had accomplished much more than many a man of twice his years. He had made for himself a most creditable position in financial circles, enjoying an unassailable reputation for business integrity as well as enterprise.

On the 28th of March, , Mr. Bolton was united in marriage to Miss Nellie J. French and they became the parents of two daughters: Carmel French, who is now the wife of Frank A. Ryder of Portland: and Nonearle French, who is at home with her mother. Bolton was always keenly interested in public affairs at The Dalles and recognition of his public spirit and his devotion to the general good was manifest in his election to the mayoralty. He belonged to the Masonic fraternity of which he was an exemplary representative and his entire life was characterized by those qualities which in every land and clime awaken confidence and respect.

His widow is now living at Alexandra Court, in Portland and is well known in the best circles of the Rose City. Married June 25, , to Agnes L. Educated at the common schools of Lafayette, Ore. Louis, Mo.

Admitted to the Supreme Court of Oregon in Practiced law in Yamhill County until , when he removed to The Dalles and practiced his profession until May , when he was appointed Judge of Seventh Judicial District of Oregon, and has served ever since.

Member K. Thirty-six years of his life have been spent in Wasco county, which numbers him among its foremost agriculturists, and his activities have also been of benefit to The Dalles. There were seven children in the family, and Thomas Brogan is the only one now living. He was reared on his father's farm and received a limited education. Leaving home when a boy of twelve, he came to the United States alone in and obtained work in the coal mines of Pennsylvania.

In he went to Liverpool, England, and for six months was on a sailing vessel bound for Australia. He landed in Melbourne, but soon after made the voyage to New Zealand, and was there engaged in mining for five years, developing a claim which yielded considerable gold. Brogan then returned to Australia and devoted his attention to the sheep and cattle business.

He also took contracts for the construction of buildings and roads and prospered in all of his ventures. In he disposed of his business in Australia and returned to the United States, identifying his interests with those of the Pacific northwest. He purchased a large ranch in Wasco county and devoted his energies to the cultivation of the soil and the raising of livestock. Success attended his well directed labors and from time to time he increased his holdings, which now comprise sixteen thousand acres of land in Wasco county.

He is the largest individual landowner in the county, and runs about four thousand head of sheep and a large band of cattle, but the management of the place is now intrusted to his son, John Brogan. The father's various ranches are improved with good buildings and contain sixty-seven miles of fencing. The work is facilitated by modern equipment and the most advanced methods are utilized in cultivating the land and caring for the stock. Brogan puts up six hundred tons of hay and alfalfa each year, and all of the grain and hay grown on the land is fed to the stock.

In he moved to The Dalles, purchasing a desirable home on Webster street, and also owns several lots in the city. He is the largest stockholder of the Citizens National Bank of The Dalles, of which he was one of the organizers, but has steadfastly refused to become an officer of the institution, feeling that the preference should be given to a younger man.

Collopy, who was born in that country. Her parents, William and Elizabeth O'Brien Collopy, were natives of Ireland and became pioneer settlers of New Zealand, in which they spent the remainder of their lives. The father followed agricultural pursuits and was a prosperous stock raiser. Collopy were born twelve children and three are now living: Bridget M.

Brogan became the parents of twelve children, six of whom survive. Mary was born in New Zealand and has remained at home. Bridget, also a native of New Zealand, became the wife of J. Robinson and has a daughter, Lillian, who is now Mrs. Ned Wyke of Portland, Oregon. John was born in New Zealand, and resides in Antelope, Oregon. Susan is likewise a native of New Zealand, and has become the wife of Frank Weiss. Katherine was born in Wasco county, and is part owner of a greenhouse at The Dalles.

Frances Grace, also a native of Wasco county, is now Mrs. John Becker. She resides in Woodburn and is the mother of one child, Thomas Joseph Becker. For more than a half century Mr. Brogan have journeyed together through life and in they celebrated their golden wedding anniversary. On that happy occasion a banquet was held at Hotel Dalles and there Mr. Brogan entertained about forty friends, from whom they received many beautiful gifts as well as congratulations. Among the treasured possessions of Mr.

Brogan is a rare onyx clock, tendered him by the premier of New Zealand and several of his most intimate friends at the time of his departure for the United States. Brogan exercises his right of franchise in support of the candidates and tenets of the republican party, and his public spirit has been demonstrated by effective work in behalf of good roads and schools. His has been a picturesque career, replete with interesting experiences.

He enjoys life and is esteemed for the qualities to which he owes his success. In May, , Mr. Brogan with Katherine and Frances, took a trip to Ireland, revisiting the old home. Clarke Publishing Company - ] Browne, Dr. He is now a successful chiropractor of The Dalles, where he is accorded a liberal patronage.

His parents were Christopher C. The Brownes were of old Pennsylvania stock and the great-grandfather of the Doctor became a pioneer of Missouri. The Mason family came from New England ancestry and were pioneers of Indiana. Christopher C.

Browne removed with his family to Oregon when his son Daniel was but a small boy and settled in Salem. The latter acquired his preliminary education in the public schools of Salem and afterward pursued an academic course at Dallas, while his professional training was received in the Pacific Chiropractic College at Portland.

Following his graduation he took up active professional work in that city and there remained from until During his stay in Portland he was for three years secretary of the Oregon Chiropractic Association and published a magazine called The Drugless Review, devoted to the school of healing which he represents. He was one of a committee appointed to draft a bill legalizing the practice of chiropractic, which was passed by the legislature in His work in that connection required so much of his time that he was forced to permit The Drugless Review to die just as it was getting on a paying basis.

This unselfishness on his part is but an index of the character of the man. In Dr. Ingram, who had built up an extensive business in The Dalles, invited Dr. Browne was united in marriage to Miss Almona R. Daniels, a daughter of Francis M. Daniels, who was a merchant. They have one child, Elizabeth, a student in the Junior high school in The Dalles. Fraternally Dr. Browne is connected with the Elks and with the Knights of Pythias. He holds to the higest standards in his profession and his ability and enterprise have brought him prominently to the front.

Robert R. Butler, a member of one of the leading law firms of The Dalles, has become well known through his service as circuit judge, as state senator, and as one of the political leaders of Oregon. He was born September 24, , in Johnson county, Tennessee, and is a son of Dr. William H. One of Mr. Butler's ancestors figured prominently in events which shaped the early history of Johnson county and the town of Butler was named in his honor.

Colonel Roderick Randon Butler, the father of Dr. William R. Grayson, the maternal grandfather of Robert H. Butler, was also a gallant officer in the Union army and rose to the rank of colonel. Butler received the M. He is a physician of high standing and draws his patients from a wide area.

To Dr. Butler were born ten children: Mrs. Baker, who lives in the state of Washington; Robert R. Sproles, who resides in North Carolina; C. James Rivers, of North Carolina. Butler was reared in the town of Butler, which has been the home of the family for generations, and supplemented his public school training by attendance at the Holly Spring College.

He received the degree of LL. For three years he followed his profession at Mountain City, Tennessee, and in came to Oregon, locating in Condon, Gilliam county, where he practiced for five years. His legal acumen led to his election to the bench and during and he was circuit judge of Sherman, Wheeler and Gilliam counties.

To each case brought before his tribunal he gave deep thought and study and the justice of his rulings proved his moral worth. As mayor of Condon he also made an excellent record and since has been a resident of The Dalles. He has a comprehensive knowledge of law and displays marked skill in its exposition.

In he formed a partnership with Samuel E. Van Vactor, who is the senior member of the firm, and a large and important clientele denotes the confidence reposed in their ability as advocates and counselors. Butler was married in and has a daughter, Elizabeth Annabel.

She was born at The Dalles, June 30, , and is attending St. Helen's Hall in Portland, Oregon. A power in the ranks of the republican party, Mr. Butler was chosen presidential elector-at-large and in was made messenger to Washington, D. In he was elected state senator without opposition and from until was a member of that law-making body.

In he again became presidential elector for Oregon and in was recalled to the office of state senator. He served from until and exerted his influence in behalf of all constructive legislation. Butler is a Kiwanian and a past chancellor of the Knights of Pythias. His well developed powers have brought him to the front in his profession and the firmness, frankness and strength of his character have established him high in public regard.

His paternal grandfather was a native of Virginia and the family were among the early pioneers of Illinois. The Coy family was of Quaker stock and numbered among the earliest residents of Pennsylvania. In Polk Butler removed with his family to Oregon, settling at Dufur, Wasco county, at which time Roy was a lad of but four years. He acquired his education in the graded schools of Dufur and in the high school at The Dalles. When quite young he entered into the mercantile business as a clerk in a general store at Boyd, Wasco county, and afterward turned his attention to ranching on Eight Mile creek, where he secured four hundred and forty acres, on which he planted an orchard and also engaged in raising cattle for the next ten years.

He likewise became interested in the mercantile business at Boyd during the same period. Butler was elected to the office of county commissioner and occupied that position for four years. In the meantime he took up his residence at The Dalles and upon the expiration of his term as commissioner he established the insurance agency which he still conducts.

He is the representative of the Oregon Fire Relief Association for the district which embraces the counties of Morrow, Gilliam, Wasco, Hood River and Sherman and has placed his company upon a sound basis in this territory, having developed a business of gratifying and substantial proportions.

Butler was married to Miss Ethel Southern, a daughter of C. Southern, a pioneer farmer of Wasco county. They have two children: Melva May and Roy Dale, both high school pupils. Butler has a sister, Mrs. Edward Griffin, of Wasco county, and two brothers: the Rev. Butler, a missionary in South Africa and E. Butler, living at The Dalles. Butler gives his political allegiance to the democratic party, yet he cannot be said to be a politician in the sense of office seeking.

The only public office he has filled besides that of county commissioner was that of postmaster at Boyd. He is an active member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and has filled all of the chairs in the local organization. The Butler family has long been represented in Oregon, for Roy D. Butler is a nephew of Daniel Butler, who came to this state in the '40s and is frequently mentioned in history as one of the founders of the state and as a fearless Indian fighter.

Under other conditions Roy D. Butler is just as loyal to the best interests of Oregon and is justly accounted one of the representative citizens of The Dalles. Collector of Internal Revenue for the District and State of Oregon, is one of those quiet, unassuming gentlemen, whom we sometimes meet in the walks of public life, and realize the fact that in his case at least the office has sought the man, not the man the office, as is too generally the case.

He is a native of Michigan and was born in He came to Oregon in and read law with Hon. Wilson, afterwards Representative in Congress from this State. He was admitted to the bar in and opened an office at Salem. He was a member of the House from Marion County in , and in was elected State Senator from the same county. In he received the appointment of United States District Attorney. At the expiration of his term of service in this capacity in , owing to failing health, he removed to Eastern Washington Territory, and there engaged in the stock business until , when he moved to The Dalles, and, in partnership with Hon.

Dunbar, resumed the practice of law. In he was elected Presidential Elector on the Republican ticket and was a participant in the memorable Electoral College of that year, when poor Cronin - peace to his ashes - was so prominent a factor, and when Oregon's vote elected President Hayes. In May, , he received his present appointment.

Cartwright is a gentleman who is highly esteemed by all who know him and is regarded as a man of sterling integrity. He is tall and spare built, smooth face, save the mustache, sharp features, clear peaceful eye, and black hair. He is a warm personal friend and one that never forgets a favor. He is courteous, genial and generous. As a public officer, he is attentive and obliging and in every way efficient. Helm, of the M.

Team] Cates, Daniel L. Conscientious and efficient, Daniel L. Cates has thoroughly demonstrated his worth as a public servant and for eleven years has been city recorder of The Dalles. He is a loyal Oregonian and a member of one of the honored, pioneer families of the state.

The following account of his career was written by Fred Lockley and published in the Oregon Journal under date of November 29, 'I was born in a log cabin on the Long Tom, near Starr's Point, in Benton county, May 7, ,' said Mr. His father's name was Alexander Cates. His mother's maiden name was Nancy Phipps and she was also a Kentuckian. My father left the Blue Grass state in , when he was nineteen years of age, and went to Missouri with an uncle, John Newton. She was a daughter of Daniel Grice, who went from that state to Kentucky and later located in Linn county, Missouri.

Father and his brother-in-law, Daniel Grice, built houses. In those days all lumber, including the flooring, was dressed by hand. Father had taken up a place in Linn county and in addition to working at his trade, raised corn and tobacco. Flournoy and his relatives.

They took the usual emigrant route during the first part of the trip and went by way of the cut-off to Fort Hall. The Nemaha river was crossed on rafts built by members of the party and at Salt creek they were detained for two days. There were few accidents on the trip, though in the early part of it an exciting incident occurred in the Pawnee country. One morning a man came riding toward them at top speed on a fine grey horse and warned them of Indians who had attacked a train in advance of them.

Three parties of emigrants had left Missouri at about the same time, the Flournoy train, the one attacked by Indians and what was called the Ohio train. The last consisted of forty men without a woman or child among them. There were two Indians in sight in an elevated position, signaling to the band that led in the attack and informing them of the movements of the whites.

The Ohio train rushed in from the rear on horseback and soon reached the Indians. The wagons of the Flournoy train were placed in a double row and the party advanced as rapidly as possible. After robbing the women of their jewelry and taking as much food and clothing as they could lay hands on, the Indians escaped and no one was injured.

The Flournoy train followed the route to the crossing of the Portneuf, which runs into the Snake river, and then traveled to the south, crossing the Raft river. As they followed its course they came to that remarkable creation of nature, the Thousand Spring valley, containing those famous soda springs which vary in temperature from boiling hot to ice cold and which cover an area of several square miles.

Proceeding through what was afterwards called the Landers cut-off, they came out on the Green river and followed its course to St. Mary's river. After passing the three Humboldt lakes they 1 were warned by a note tacked up by the roadside of danger from Indians. Two men had been killed and a little farther on the body of an Indian was found lying in the road. At the foot of the last lake two roads separate, one leading to the Carson river and the other to the Truckee river.

The party followed the Truckee road and about September 17, , camped where the Donner party endured their sufferings and where some met their tragic deaths in They could see plainly where the trees had been cut down and limbs cut off of others ten or twelve feet above the ground, showing how deep the snow must have been when they camped on it.

Later he took up a claim on Poor Man creek, finding dirt which paid him thirty dollars a day with pick and pan. After working the claim for a month the heavy snow drove him out and he went back to Nevada City, where he spent the winter. Next spring he found a claim from which. In company with three other miners he engaged in prospecting on Kanaha creek. They struck a claim where they took out fifty dollars a day.

As soon as their grub was gone they went back to Nevada City and brought out twelve hundred pounds of supplies on seven pack horses. They found their claim had been jumped, so they struck out down the creek and struck another claim even richer than the first. On July 4, , the four of them took out over six hundred dollars. They averaged about one hundred dollars a day. My father's partners became dissatisfied and thought they could find a richer ground, so he bought them out and worked the claim until late in the fall of Downieville, the nearest post office, was twelve miles distant by mountain trail.

He worked on a hotel and was paid ten dollars a day. After the hotel was built he went to Sacramento and from there to San Francisco, where he bought a ticket for Panama. He had to pay sixteen dollars for the use of a mule to ride twenty-six miles across the isthmus to connect with a boat.

After he had ridden about two-thirds of the way he overtook a miner, who offered him eight dollars for the use of the mule for the remaining eight miles, so father walked the rest of the way. He had to pay a fare of ten dollars on a rowboat which took him to the Atlantic side of the isthmus. The natives were having a revolution and told the Californians to keep off the streets so they wouldn't get hurt.

However, the Americans wanted to see what was going on, so one of them was killed, as well as a number of natives. The American consul sent out to the Cherokee and Ohio, which were anchored in the stream, and got a brass six-pounder and an iron cannon.

He put these so he could sweep the street and told the natives that if they fought any more or killed any more Americans he would turn the cannon loose, so they decided to quit fighting. He bought a steerage ticket for New York for fifty dollars. The first cabin ticket was seventy-five dollars. After he got on the boat he paid the purser five dollars extra to sit at the first cabin table and have a cabin like the first class passengers.

The Ohio was a sidewheeler and there were about two hundred returning gold miners aboard. At Havana they transferred to the Georgia for New Orleans. In the Crescent city he paid sixteen dollars for a ticket to St. Louis and made the trip of about twelve-hundred miles on the Patrick Henry. At St.

Louis he took passage on a small boat called the Lewis F. Linn, for Brunswick, the great tobacco trading point on the Missouri, traveling with Washington Leach, who had been his companion in the mines of California and on the returning sea voyage. At Brunswick he hired a rig to drive to Linneus, where he had left mother. When he arrived there he found that his father-in-law had sold out and that mother had gone to Jive with Uncle Newton.

He hired a man to drive him out to the Newton place. He bought a house and lot for three hundred dollars and got a job as carpenter at a dollar and a quarter a day. In the party were father's cousin, Ambrose Newton, who brought his wife and three children. He had two wagons, with four yoke of oxen to each, and was accompanied by three young men, who came along to work for their board. Father had one wagon, three yoke of oxen and two cows. In his wagon were himself, mother, Sarah, the baby, and a young man named Washington Ward, who went along to work for his hoard.

The members of the train chose father as their captain because of his previous experience in crossing the plains. The emigrants drove to St. Joseph, Missouri, and thence up the river, which they crossed at Council Bluffs. They took the south side of the Platte. A large party of Pawnee Indians accompanied them almost to Ash Hollow. There my father and Mr. Wiley went on a hunting expedition. Father killed a big buffalo and they loaded their horses with meat. When they were hunting a hail storm came up which was so severe that the cattle couldn't face it.

They turned around and drifted with the storm. On the Bear river in Utah six saddle horses were stolen. Father lost a good horse. He said that when he and Fowler were looking for the horses they met an Indian on a cayuse,while his squaw was mounted on a big roan horse. Father had a rifle with inlaid silver work and the Indian tried to take it.

Father pulled out his Colt revolver and the Indian changed his mind, and the last father saw of him and the squaw they were making their horses go as fast as they could. The next day the party arrived at Steamboat Springs, where an Englishman had a trading station. After crossing the Malheur river they went down the Snake and struck Burnt river at a point where Huntington was afterward built. They passed through the Powder River valley below the place where Baker City is now located and there father suffered from blood poisoning, which endangered his life.

After coming into the Grande Ronde valley they passed Medical lake and in the Blue mountains stayed over night at Lee's encampment, now Bingham Springs. Then they proceeded down the Wild Horse through what is now the Umatilla Indian reservation, finding Indians there who were raising corn and potatoes. After reaching Deschutes they made their way down Ten-Mile creek and thence to Tygh valley.

They passed through the Barlow tollgate and down Laurel Hill, soon afterward coming to the Big Sandy valley. On September 9 they reached Foster's famous ranch and on the 11th crossed the Willamette at Portland on a capstan and two horses. In father and Fred Flora took a contract to get out timbers and build a barn for Captain Doty in Yamhill county. Father next built a granary for Mr. McLeod on Tualatin plains. They paid him seven dollars a day and he took his pay in flour, which he sold in Portland.

From Tualatin plains he moved to the Long Tom, in Beaten county, where he bought, for three hundred dollars, a quarter section. Forty acres of the tract had been fenced and there was a good house on the place. Father bought a land entry of one hundred and sixty acres for one hundred and twenty dollars and took up the adjoining quarter section. The first loom on the Long Tom was constructed by father, who built it for Mrs. He was paid forty dollars for the job.

Ferguson wove homespun cloth. He bought a new wagon, a span of mules and ninety head of cattle. He hired John Florence to drive the stock over the Barlow trail to the Dennis Maloney place, near the present site of Dufur.

Father traded our place to Mrs. Upton for two large mares, Pet and Pigeon. Afterward father moved to Eight-Mile creek, purchasing a farm from "Big Steve" Edwards, and there mother died in the fall of , leaving two sons and two daughters, one a baby less than a year old. The hard winter of nearly wiped father off the map financially.

He had only thirty head of stock left when the snow went off in the spring. Susan Griffin, my mother's sister, died shortly alter we children went there. Father and Fred Flora had started in the spring of with a herd of cattle for the Orofino mines in Idaho. My sister did the housework. When J. Broadwell bought the place my sister Sarah and I stayed with him for two years. My brother Willie went to Idaho with my father, who purchased a mine in the Boise basin and later moved to Rocky Bar, in Alturas county, that state.

He was absent two years and brought home fourteen hundred dollars. He built a mill on Fifteen-Mile creek near the Meadows, also owning a mill on the Columbia, opposite Wind river, and this he later sold to Joseph T. While operating the plant he built a small steamboat to handle the lumber. After disposing of his mills father worked for a time at his trade and aided in constructing the shoe factory in North Dalles.

In father married Mrs. Elizabeth Herbert, a widow, who had two children: Mrs. Jane Sherer, deceased; and George A. Herbert, now a resident of Baker, Oregon. The mother of these children passed away at The Dalles and father's death occurred at Cascade Locks, Oregon, in My sister Sarah, the oldest of the family, was born in Missouri in On May 10, , she became the wife of William Frizzell, and her demise occurred in at Cascade Locks.

My brother William was born in Benton county, Oregon, in and is now living in Oakland, California. I was the third child and my full name is Daniel Lycurgus Cates. My sister Susan was born February 14, , in Wasco county, Oregon. She became the wife of W. Wilson, a well known attorney of Portland, Oregon, and died February 14, Cates attended the public schools at The Dalles and one of his instructors was Professor S. From until he was in the employ of his father, who at that time was operating a saw mill above Cascade Locks, where the town of Wyeth is now located.

His lumber yard at The Dalles was managed by Daniel L. Cates, who afterward became a bookkeeper for John H. Larsen, a dealer in wool and hides. Cates remained until , when he was appointed a deputy under George Herbert, sheriff of Wasco county, and acted in that capacity for four years.

In he was elected sheriff and served for two years, thoroughly justifying the trust reposed in him. In August, , he located at Cascade Locks, opening a general store, which he conducted during the construction of the locks. About five hundred men were at work and in the locks were completed by J.

At that time Mr. Cates disposed of the business and established a drug store, of which he was the proprietor for two years. Crossing the Columbia river, he purchased a tract of three hundred and twenty acres in Skamania county, Washington, and applied himself to the task of clearing the land.

He cut down the timber, which he sawed into logs, and disposed of them at a good figure. A few years later he sold the ranch and in November, , returned to The Dalles. Prosperity had attended his various undertakings and for a time he lived retired. In he was prevailed upon to reenter the arena of public affairs and has since been city recorder. His duties are discharged with characteristic thoroughness and fidelity and his continued retention in the office proves that his services are appreciated.

On October 9, , Mr. Cates is the ninth in line of descent from Jan Stryker, who was born in Holland in and emigrated from Ruinen, a village in the province of Drenthe, with his wife, two sons and four daughters, arriving at New Amsterdam in The mother of these children was Lambertje Seubering, who died several years after the family came to America. She survived her husband, who was a man of prominence in colonial days. In he was elected chief magistrate of Midworet and according to the Colonial History of New York" he was a member of the embassy sent from New Amsterdam to the lord mayors in Holland.

The history also states that he became a representative in the general assembly on April 10, , a member of the Hempstead convention of , and was commissioned captain of a military company on October 25, His brother, who also came to this country, was named Jacobus Garretsen Stryker.

Jan Stryker and his first wife had a large family. She died June 17, , and his demise occurred June 11, He was high sheriff of Kings county, Long Island; judge of the court from until , and was made captain of a foot company in On June 1, , he purchased four thousand acres of land on Millstone river in Somerset county, New Jersey.

It does not appear that he ever lived on this property but his sons, Jacob and Barends, and his grandsons, the four sons of Jan, removed from Flatbush to New Jersey. Pieter and Annetje Barends Stryker had eleven children. Jan Stryker, their third child, was born August 6, , and in married Margarita Schenck.

She was baptized June 2, , and married February 17, Her death occurred July 15, , and her husband passed away August 17, He was a member of the Kings County militia. Jan Stryker had nine children by his first wife and five by the second. Pieter Stryker, the eldest child of his first wife, was born September 14, , at Flatbush, Long island, and about married Antje Deremer.

Death summoned him on December 28, He had eleven children by his first wife and one by the second. His son, John Stryker, the eighth child of his first union, was born March 2, , and became captain of the Somerset County militia but was afterwards attached to the state troops.

His marriage with Lydia Cornell was solemnized November 13, , and on March 25, , he responded to the final summons. His wife was born March 15, , and died November 4, John and Lydia Cornell Stryker were the parents of ten children. James I. She was born November 5, , and died about in Cayuga county, New York, while his demise occurred December 14, Their family numbered eight children.

Stryker died December 2, , in Vancouver, Washington, and her husband's death occurred in that city on December 21, In their family were four daughters, of whom Alice is the eldest. By her marriage to Daniel L. Cates she became the mother of four children. The fourth child died in infancy. Cates takes a keen interest in fraternal affairs and is a charter member of The Dalles Lodge of the Knights of Pythias, in which he has filled all of the chairs.

In all matters of citizenship he is loyal, progressive and public-spirited and his personal qualities are such as make for popularity. Clarke Publishing Company - ] Chrisman, Levi No public official of Wasco county enjoys a higher reputation than Levi Chrisman, who has served continuously as sheriff for a period of twenty-two years, and represents the third generation of the family in Oregon.

In , when their son Campbell E. Margaret Chrisman there passed away in and her husband remained on the ranch until He then sold the place and came to The Dalles, where he lived retired until his death a few years later. Campbell E. Chrisman was educated in the public schools of Dayton and remained at home until , when he moved to The Dalles.

For a time he leased the ranch near Dufur and about purchased the property. He cultivated the farm until and then sold the tract. Returning to The Dalles, he became a dealer in grain and conducted a grocery and a feed store. Catering to both the wholesale and retail trades, he established a large patronage and continued the business until , when he retired.

He served on the school board and manifested a deep interest in matters touching the welfare and progress of his community. Her parents, John E. Her father was a Christian minister and one of the early circuit riders of Oregon, traveling on horseback to isolated districts in order to spread the Gospel. He passed away early in the '70s and his widow survived him by ten years. The demise of Campbell E.

Chrisman occurred May 15, , at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Taylor, a resident of The Dalles, and on February 20, , his widow was called to her final rest. To their union were born seven children. Lulu, the eldest, was born on the homestead near Dufur and is the widow of Henry Taylor. She has two children: Mrs. Lulu P.

Hugh Chrisman is sheriff of Sherman county and has been the incumbent of the office for eight years. Levi is the next of the family and his brother Frank lives in Oakland, California. Emma, the seventh in order of birth, died in infancy. For four years he was a railroad employe and in ventured in business for himself at The Dalles. In partnership with his brother Frank he opened a meat market, which he conducted successfully for sixteen years, also dealing in live stock.

He was elected sheriff of Wasco county on the republican ticket in and his long retention in this office is an eloquent testimonial to the quality of his service. In the discharge of his important duties he is conscientious, efficient and fearless and during his tenure of office the percentage of crime in the country has been appreciably lowered.

His record is unsullied and in length of service has never been equaled by any other sheriff in the state. Chrisman married Miss Edna C. Martin, who was born in Illinois, and died February 13, She had become the mother of five children. Edna, the first born, is the wife of Robert P. Johnson, of Portland, Oregon, and has two daughters, Margaret and Virginia.

The other children of Mr. Chrisman are: Mrs. Neva M. Rasmussen, of Seattle, Washington; Robert, who was admitted to the bar in and is practicing in Wallowa, Oregon; Cecil, who is a junior at the University of Oregon and is preparing to enter the legal profession; and Elsie, who was graduated from the high school at The Dalles and is taking a course in a Portland business college. The children are natives of The Dalles and all have received the benefit of a good education. In the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias he has filled all of the chairs and is also affiliated with the Woodmen of the World and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.

He has a wide acquaintance and draws his friends from all walks of life, possessing those qualities which inspire strong and enduring regard. Clarke Publishing Company - ] Clausen, F. Agricultural progress in the Columbia River Valley has received marked impetus from the enterprising spirit and systematic labors of F. Clausen, a pioneer wheat grower of Wasco county and one of its large land owners.

Having accumulated a sum more than sufficient for his needs, he is spending the evening of life in ease and comfort and resides in an attractive home at The Dalles. He was born February 1, , in Kolding, Denmark, and his parents, Nicolai and Karen Clausen, were life-long residents of that country. His father's demise occurred in and the mother long survived him, passing away in They had eight children, four of whom attained years of maturity: F.

Clausen received a common school education and laid aside his textbooks at the age of sixteen, as his assistance was needed on the home farm. His country was engaged in war with Germany, which took the province of Schleswig-Holstein as indemnity from Denmark.

The family lived near the boundary line dividing the two countries and two brothers of F. Clausen served in the Danish army. Being unwilling to swear allegiance to Germany, he left his native land and on April 7, , sailed from Hamburg on a vessel which bore him to New York city. He then purchased a ticket for San Francisco, California, and for a period of four years was engaged in dairying near Sacramento. In partnership with his brother James, he operated a wheat ranch in the Sacramento valley for two years and then decided to migrate to Oregon.

Selling his interest in the ranch to his brother, he came to The Dalles in the spring of and soon afterward filed on a homestead on the Deschutes river, twenty miles southeast of the town. He proved up on the land and later secured a timber claim. As fast as his resources permitted Mr. Clausen increased his holdings and is now the owner of three thousand acres of land in Wasco county.

ALEXBETTING LIVE MAIL

Agosti, S. Osten B. Kibbey, B. Batey, L. Schoen- P m felt Byrai D. Row 3: D. Lzlbpen K. Wisniewski M. Collins, R. Morrin, C. Larier, T Wagner, R. Beckman, S. Row 4: D. DeWitt D. Deoer, f Skeldon, D. Bradley, D. Stevens, B. Crindle, B. Row 3: K. Bonai T Ligibel R. Wells, T Sayers, Wezlv, H. Zibbel R. TT66bl, D. Mal- lory, A. Pineiottz, T Printke, R. Heinrning, T Neeb, M. Upham, M. Perzynskz, M. Neu- hausel, Polakovie, V Knotts. Row 4: M. Mohler, D. Nowak, R Link, A. Newton, f MeGreevy, Gram- ling, D.

Paul j. Parent L. McCartney, M. Smith, D. McDermott W Lyons, D. Not photograplzeaf' C. Binkert f. Lewandozuski S. Sitek, K. Wichowskz, R Albrecht, B. Basso, S. Borgess, M Woofl M E. Ignasiak, C. Niewz'a- domskz, K. La Scola. Row 2: M Behan, S. Gardner, S. Lechlak, R Lennex, S. Barrow, K Kozlowski B.

Hegedus, C. Siwa, M. Kubzbkzl Row 3: f Wakelin, E. Samsel, S. Sminiak, W Sneider, R. Michalak, B. Kubicg Gardnen B. Rielzhe, R. Nirschl F johnson. Row 4: f Kahl R. Day, f Szychowskz, L. Bzlvsonnette, R. Becker, K. Winningen M. Shea, T Zimmerman, D. Patrick of Heatherdowns Court House St. Baiog, S. Bohnelg Milano, M. Olczak, A. Ciehy, N Swemba, A. Cyranowskz, C.

Slashiewicz, C. Szpansl-cz, M. Row 2: R Thompson, G. Hunten S. Lindsay, B. Humbert, S. Maloney, f Bonh, M. Szyperskz, R. Bellingen M Seilg B. Sprunlc, Row 3: C. Crowley, T Humphrey, f Stein, D. Petlee C. MeCary, R. Polanah YT Soehockz, M. Simon, f Stevens, T Kall-fa, C. Hunler, M. Amslulg M. Aunt Eller tries to raise the price on the box lunch in the bidding competition between fud Fry and Andrew Carnes. Gerald DePrisco and Mrs. Roger Weiher to select it as the spring musical.

Ali cried, "It's a Scandal! It's an Outrage! Laurey soon realized her true feelings for Curly and they became engaged. On their wedding night, friends wished them well by singing " Oklahoma! Curly was declared innocent and he and Laurey departed in the surrey. R AAR ,. Roger Weiher, played to enthusiastic audiences, November The orchestra, under the direction of Mr.

Donald Noble, provided musical selections during the intermission of the popular Broadway comedy. The plot revolves around the two Sherwood sisters -- Ruth, a neophyte journalist, and her sister'Eileen, an aspiring actress -- from Columbus, Ohio, who try to "make good" in New York. The girls lease a Greenwich Village basement studio.

During the first few months, a variety of hilarious situations created by the neighbors upstairs, the Greek land- lord-painter, friendly Portuguese sailors, and other unusual visitors create a whirl of activity for the two heroines. The heartwarming comedy is climaxed by the girls' decision to remain in New York rather than to return home.

Never a dullmoment in theSherwoodstudio! Appopolus holds the newbi- szgned lease as a sandhog fLarry McCartneyj takes a short-cut through the studio. Eileen Sherwood fSuzanne Borgessj who makes friends The Wreck fMiheAinstutzj, Helen'shus- band observes his mother-in-law for the first time. The Slaff also runs the addressograph.

Deep i'n thought sports editor Lar- ry Montrie contemplates the posi- tioning ofa story for the next issue. To right: Page one editors take the first step in preparing the newspaper, planning a page layout. Activities center around mascot "Squeak " perched on the desk. Co-editors Mary Ellen Ignasiak and Yim Sexton eo-ordinate the workings ofallfourpages toproduce thejinzshedpaper.

Business managers Frank Grobosky, and Torn Meehan place a telephone call while ad managers Larry Nester and Clarence Cerrone Qzpe statements to send to those who purchased ads. The Centric, under the guidance of co-editors Tim Sexton, Mary Ellen Ignasiak and moderator Sister Thomas More OSU, donned a new look this year as the production process was switched to offset printing in january.

The staffwas faced with headlines, layouts and dead- lines as they rushed to bring Centralites news of the school community. Room became the center of activity as the bi-weekly deadlines grew near. This year's publications, besides sporting the tradi- tional Squeak, club, and class columns, also featured a variety of new angles in news reporting. Guest columnists and interviews with civic leaders greeted Centralites when they delved into their papers.

The Centric has carried on the tradition set by its predecessors of factual, non-biased reporting in an effort to keep all students up to date on school activities. Page 65 entripetcil Hub Cf Activity The Cenfripeial staff, under the leadership of John Gardner and Frances Hayes, fought deadlines and headlines in an attempt to present this year's annual. The staff was faced with the task of determining color, theme, and arrangement in an attempt to make this year's edition of the Ceniripeial a publication to remember.

The yearbook, financed by a patron drive which netted over S3,, advertising and student subscription drives, went to press in April. The staff hopes that the Ceniripeial will hold fond memories of this school year. The business stajfsuceessfulbz changed debits z'nt0 credits. Sharon Simms and Elaine Cuzynskzg arteditors, check final page layouts before forwarding them to the printer.

The cover design was the outgrowth ofElaine's original sketch. Page 67 In his ofice as student council president jeffrey Hellrung zls responsible for the successful completion ofeach council undertaking. Student Council Promotes Activities The Student Council acts as the voice of Central's students in co- ordinating extra-curricular activities. School projects are guided by the hard work of the directors.

Serving her first year as moderator is Sr. Johnene, SND, assisted by veteran, Mr. Tim Dever. The executive committee, consisting of student council officers, class officers, senators and commissioners, bears the responsibility for co-orclinating all school projects. Meeting each Monday, they discuss matters pertinent to school life. This year, the Inter-Club Council, under the direction of vice-president John Woll, has been reactivated. Row I, leh to right Kathy Curto, sophomore secretary, Ron Nz'rschl senat0r,' Terri Augello, senator, janet Soviar, senaton' john Woll student council vice-president' jejj Hellrung, student councilpresident.

Row 3, janice jagodzinskz, merit,' Sue Lindsey, junior secretary, Pat Lane, junior treas- uren' Mz'ke Higgins, freshman vice-president' Carol Boyce, freshman secretary, Nancy Poole, freshman treasurer. Page 68 Leaders of the school and co-ordinators of activities, the Student Council omcers, john Woll vice-presidenl' Nancy Heil treasuren' jeff Hellrung, presidenl' and Sue Zalenskz, secretary, keep Central 's projects running ejWctiveb1.

Page 69 will Up QW ilr , Lfxlnh. Bonnie Batestole willput the missal on the altar and Trudy Daley will light a fresh vigil lamp. Under the auspices of Sr. John Berchman Sanctuary Society promotes religious vocations among the boys who act as servers. Under the guidance of Sr. Lucilla RSM, the Catholic Art Apostolate strives to raise the stand- ards of appreciation and revive true Christian art by presentation of slides and discussion of art values.

The daily care of Christ the King Chapel is the duty of members of the St. Hilda Guild, directed by Sr. Ruth Ann SND. Club dues provide ac- cessories and necessities for the chapel. Club members prepare altar in the gym for the annual retreat. Standing are Dave Lardinais and Richard Buckenmeyer. The medicine is shipped to the foreign mis- sions. Mike Fosnaugk proposes the gualijications of his favorite candidate to Karen Kirk and feanne Nalodka. Craig LaBay and Harley Andr- zejewski express their points of view.

Mary of Mercy RSM. Under the direction of Sr. Adolph SND, members of the German Club participate in activities designed to enrich their knowl- edge of German culture and geography such as attending the International Insti- tute which familiarizes members with Ger- man songs and dances.

Members are elected into the National Hon- or Society by the faculty. Students elected must have the necessary scholastic require- ments, as well as outstanding Leadership, Service and Character. The organization has used as its theme for the year, "the development of the arts for leisure. A board of nine faculty members comprise thefaculty committee, with Mrs. Velma C.

Pfeiffer act- ing as the advisor. Kathleen SND, moderates monthly French Club meetings, planned to promote a deeper interest in the people and customs of France. French club ofcers proudb di'splay French valentines designed by club mem- bers. Chris Seibenick feels the one she selects is very appropriate to send to their friends in France. German club members conkr on the customs of the German people as de- picted in the pictures.

Clarisena RSM, acquaints members with various educational fields by observing ele- mentary cl a s s r o o m procedure in area schools. The Chemistry Club, guided by Sr. Flo- rian, OSF, supplements the student's chem- ical knowledge through the presentation of recent improvements and new theories. The Spanish Club, moderated by Sr. Highlighting the year is the Saturnalia at Christmas time and the state convention in Columbus.

The Radio Club, supervised by Sr. Tere- sita, OSF, develops interest in electronics through practical experience and provides a means to obtain a license. In order to gain valuable experience, Mary Ball takes notes on theprocess ofcalculating grades as Karoll Rowe observes one ofthe daihz procedures she will perform aher four years ofcollege preparation for the teaching profession.

David Kolodziejczyk demonstrates to Radio Club members the proper way to speak into the microphone ofa short-wave radio system. L Q if lie? Rahlh Trease and john Wozny learn the intricacies of a gyroseope, as an aid to th eir eh enzieal studies. The Romans honored the Saturn, the earth goal in thanksgiving for a bountiful harvest.

Some modern Christmas customs stern from the Roman Satur- nalia. Page 75 Encouraging interest in the field of mathematics is the goal of the Math Club. Under the supervision of Sr. Teresita OSF, members took a field trip through the University of Toledo computer center, and heard many fine speakers at regularly sched- uled meetings. Obtaining a greater knowledge of the functions of science in daily life is stressed by the Biology Club, directed by Sr. Blandina OSF. To improve the club's organization and activities, a constitution has been written and ratified by members.

The basic function of the Camera Club is to develop skill in the use of the camera. Aided by Sr. Lucilla RSM, members learn the latest methods in developing and processing photos. To acquaint themselves with the different oppor- tunities open to registered nurses, the Future Nurses of America tour area hospitals and attend lectures given by key people in the medical field. Ambrose RSM serves as moderator. Stephanie Schafer ana' Nancy Meredi'th realize the effort and hard work put into a science project in order to earn a Superior Rating.

Page 76 Alathematicianas, Ed Mowha ana' Esther Kosahowski discuss the problem of computing the area ofthe 3-Dpobzgon which john Pacer holds. Marihzn Bagdonas and Mi'ke Cyurko check me th eofe m for me Coffef fmeizwd ofeomputing the answer. Through Club Activities fay Kowalski fim Hermann, ana' fohn Falke focus their attention on Peggy LaPZante as they examine the photographic merits ofthe picture she holds.

Library Club members attempt to bring students to a greater realization ofthe true value offrequent reading. Clubs Emphasize Reading Lending a helping hand to allow librarians more time for their professional services, the Library Club members assist students in taking out and returning books. The climax of the year was the presentation of an assembly by members entitled: "Book- land Characters. For the second year member students, under the leadership of Mr. Dean Richards, attempt to bring the knowledge they gain to others following the principle of" Each one teach one.

Row 4, Dan Buehenmeyen and Tom Rawshi. The grid-men of Central won 7 of their 9 games. Their only city league defeat came with less than a minute to go against Macomber, as the Irish were finally worn down by a much heavier team. The high pointofthe season came on the after- noon of November 8, when Central's" Fighting Irishlthumped the Knights of St. Francis, This win kept the "Irish Knight", a coveted and sought after trophy, in the hands of Central for another year.

Other high points were frequent as the Irish gridders re- bounded from a poor preceeding season. The Celts also proved they were not lack- ing for defensive ability as evidenced by a victory over a tough Libbey Cowboy squad in which the defense sparkled. In conclusion tothe successful campaign, 14 Fighting Irish merited All-City honors. Zolciak and McGurk also were honored at the annual foot- ball banquet.

Zolciak was named most valuable player and jim McCurk was cited as the player with the most desire. Daugherty stressed the value of football as a means of acquiring team- work, sacrifice, and discipline and stated, "The greatest value of competitive activity is the learning of the value to excel. Coachfim Cordiak and second squad watch anxiousbz from sidelines. Brown: E. Cazula' T Krzyrninskg' R.

Flores: K. Millen' M. Braung Yf Bz'rz'e,' R. Nix,' Niezgoda,' D. Mowka: R. Arbing- en' M. Blankg C. Murphygf Daouslgf Palicki. Row 3: Mr. Hzghg T Leopolaff Koralewskzg' R. Napz'erala,' D. McCormick: B. Krall' R. Lawrenceg B. Hockrnang R. Mahoney: T Gramlingg C. Drennang G.

Bolling R. Tobianskzg' B. Bolback: D. Peterg' C. Frankowskzg' G. Wasielewskif Conling M Zoltanskzy M. Bolling f McKenzie' M. Boklanaf B. Wiener f Kozlowski' Yf Novak. Row 3: R Tanseyg R. Minon' D. Marlin: M Miller: L. Caroolsg B. Myers: D. Pettea' R. Langen- derfer. Row 4: Y. Horne, M Meeks: B. Smiikg D. Paul' B. DeVanna,' R. Skeahan: W Karmol' Gagnei' B. Beeklerg' G. Row 4: fohn Newman fMGR. Mike Murrzezz clairn the twine ahcr victory Central over Si.

McGurh, f. Haiey, D. Zolciak, M. Murncrz, j. Kozlowski Yi Schick, P foyce, f Sczychowshz f. Gintcr, S. Shay, T Boardman. Coaches: Mr. Don Lewis, Mr. S J - i -W'-0 faakay. James Zak Page 96 Mr. Dever has again proven an invalu- able aid to Central Catholic's sports program. Acting in his official post as Athletic Director, Mr.

Dever is the one person most responsible forthe dynamic spirit characteristic of Central's teams and student body. This first year ashead coach ofthe Fight- ing Irish grid team has been most satis- factory for Mr. Under his guidance the team, one ofthelightest in the city, compiled a record and took second place in the City League.

Cordiak is also the boys' Physiology teacher. Zak, another first-year man, has won his place on Central's athletic staff. He is the head golf coach and he assist- ed Mr. Cordiak with the football team and Mr. Lewis with the Varsity Basket- ball team.

Zak is also a Physical Education teacher. Donald Lewis is well-known around Central. He has been a coach at CCHS for five years. He made his debut as a backfield coach for the football team and has spent the past two seasons as head basketball coach. Lewis is also one of Central's Government teachers. Donald Lewis Mr. Joseph Wesfenkirchner Now in his third year ofcoaching varsity football at Central, Mr. Westenkirchner has compiled an admirable record.

The ex-pro, a former player with the Los Angeles Rams, is head coach of the base- ball team and assistant line coach and trainer for the gridiron team. Peter Benedict Mr, Piloseno has been on Central's faculty since , coaching the wrestling team to numerous cham- pionships and piloting the success- ful bowling team.

This year's wrestling team captured third place in the state tourney and the bowl- ing team took the first place tro- phy in both divisions ofthe city league. Daniel Piloseno Mr. Gajdostik is a man of many duties. This year he coached the cross country team and took charge of the school book- store. He also keeps his regular duties as a history teacher. Benedict is now completing his second year on the Irish coaching staff. The assist- ant football and basketball coach is a grad- uate and two-year letter man ofthe Univer- sity of Toledo, class of He teaches boys' Physical Education.

Dennis Galaydu In Mr. Galayda's first year at Central he has taken charge of the track team and has high hopes for this year's cindermen. He was an assistant football coach under Mr. Galayda is also an instructor in history. Daniel Pilosizzo. Page 98 Plzz'! MeCartney in aelion on the mats. Daniel Piloseno gives Ed R0- nzito a word of encouragement, Tom fazwieekzgrapples forposiiion. Row 5: Richard Knzghzl David! Row 2: ffm Matuzak, Pau!

Row Mike Horne, Bi!! Row 4: Fm Renaraf Pki! Francis High School, March On March 10, Mr. Tim Dever, athletic director, presented letters to participants of at least six matches during league play. The helmsman guiding the champion "wood pushers" is Fr. Jude Rochford,who has coached Central's Chess teams since Page Lej? The GAL aims to develop the qualities of sportsmanship and athletic ability in girls, just as the varsity sports do for the boys. The program includes lessons in tumbling, balance beam, table tennis, shufileboard, basketball, and soccer in the first semester.

During the second semester the girls participate in modern dancing, volleyball, archery, softball and relays. The program rests in the very capable hands of Miss Frances Kronipak and Miss Maureen Gallagher, who have initiated several new activities this year. They have also started an intramural program in basketball and tennis. The outstanding time ofthe year comes at the annual GAL banquet, when one girl is chosen to receive the ALI, - around Trophy for the most active sports participation.

Page wan, A-W. V: is'. Changes forseen and unex- pected, announced by Monsignor Harrington each morning, affect the lives ot students at Central. Bailey i A at Patrick X. Higgins, vice president' Caro! Boyce, secretary, Nancy Poole, treasurer.

Jagodzinski,James W. M45 www rf W crfU 5'E' Zg sq? R, ,,,. X f'l ' I' ' y T:TT 1 :L1 gy. Kozlowski Page ' 1 Kathleen M. Wa EaeacfwE?! J I W1-it til'-fl-. Kw , fr ' ,,3g3s:zftf,1,:,,,f- in.. G5' , ,. T 'fs waxy Ear , Chagks Early, Barbara East 6 i"'. A -" -f ,ez. W 'il. VV gf ,:,-, 5. J,fff ' 'ef f. QI'f' V' 'V T f '. S 73 fl. Thomas, Kathleen T. Hail- ing from St. Richard's scholastic achievements have been highlighted by two city-wide math awards, two national Latin awards, and the honor of being named "High School Science Student of the Year.

Agnes parish, ranks first in the senior class. After graduation from Central, Esther will enter St. She is a member of St. KRUM St. Agnes 62 rv' Stanislaus M? Pearl St. Rowland-Hall Patrol 45 Patron Drive 4. Lake St. Clement Ct. Park St. Hilda Guild 1, 4, Production Staff 3, 4. John Berchman Society 3, Math Club 4. Hall Patrol 45 Student Court 4. Weber St. Hudson St. Central Ave. Loowus, Rum Jackman Rd. Cove Blvd. JOAN 27 W. John Berch- man Society 45 Usher 4.

Byrne Rd. Weber-Patron Drive 4. IO9th St. Page mural I, 2, 3, Track 4, Patron Drive 4. Lockwood-Football I. SC I, 2, Dancing Irish 4. Gallagher Rt. John L. Harrington Rt. Ignatius T. Kelly Rt. Jerome E. Schmit Msgr. Albert Sprenger Rev Rev. Thomas Beauregard Herbert Kraus Rev. John J. Meehan Rev. Joseph Mrowca Rev. John P. Pasqualin Rev.

Robert Reinhart Rev. Joseph D. Shenk Rev. Ernest Waechter, O. Arnerr Donald L. David W. Barry, Jr. Jack Becker, D. Robert Beckham Mr. Martin Bennett Mr. Berning Walter Bick J. Biggs Mrs. Vera Biggs Mr. Harry Biniak Mr. Bissonnette Mr. Thomas K. Blachowski Mr. Lou Block Mr. Donald Boes Mr. Alvin Bogdanski Mrs. Alene Boldt Mr. Joseph Bonk Mrs. Bernadette Boratyn Barbara Borawski Mr.

Frank Borawski Mr. Thomas Borer Mr. Anthony A. Bosch, Sr. Leonard Bromer "Bubbles" Mr. Don Buck William E. Buehler, Class of '64 Mrs. Carr Mr. Fredrick Cerrone Mr. Chmielewski Mr. Robert MacFadden Mr. Cichy Mr. Crane Mr. Charles Cray Mr. Robert Cryan Mrs. Anthony Colisino Anne T. Collins Dr. James I. Collins Mr. Harold Corcoran Mr. Loyd Cousino Mr. Cuzynski Mr. Edmund Czarnecki Mr. Stan Czyzewski D. Kathy Dauer Mrs. Leona Davidson Josephine Dazewiecki Mr. Marshall R.

Desmond Mr. Dillon Mr. Peter DiPaola Mr. Leo C. Dressel Mr. Richard C. Duffey R. Hemming Dullum Mr. William Dunn Mr. Albert F. Earl Mr. Carl Eckhardt Mr. Eckstein Mr. Eggleston Mr. John Ehret Mr. John Eisenreich Mr. Felix Ellerbrock Mrs. William Emery Gabriel N. Esper and Family Mrs. Lorraine Essi P. Extejt Rose E. F alke Mr. Donald Fall Fang Mr. Max Ferrenberg Sue A. Ferrenberg Mr.

Cecil Finley Mr. Larry Fischer Mr. Kenneth Fisher Mr. John C. Howard Flahiff Mr. Edward Forgette Sr. Frank Mr. Galayda Mr. Vincent Girardi Mr. Grime L. Gladieux Mr. Leo Gladieux and Dan Mr. Stanley Glinka Henry Goodman Dr. Terrence P. Gorman Mr. Carl Graber Mr. Graber Mr. Sylvester Grandowicz Mr. Frank Grayczyk, Jr. Virgil Grosjean Mr. John E. Gurecky Mr. Frank Habrych and Nancy Mr. Richard Harley Phil R.

Harrison Mr. Lee Hawkins Mr. Raymond L. Hawkins Mr. Howard G. Hayes Mr. John Healy Mr. Gene Hegedus James O. Helland '49 Mr. Helmer Marci Helmier '64 Mr. As they followed its course they came to that remarkable creation of nature, the Thousand Spring valley, containing those famous soda springs which vary in temperature from boiling hot to ice cold and which cover an area of several square miles. Proceeding through what was afterwards called the Landers cut-off, they came out on the Green river and followed its course to St.

Mary's river. After passing the three Humboldt lakes they 1 were warned by a note tacked up by the roadside of danger from Indians. Two men had been killed and a little farther on the body of an Indian was found lying in the road. At the foot of the last lake two roads separate, one leading to the Carson river and the other to the Truckee river. The party followed the Truckee road and about September 17, , camped where the Donner party endured their sufferings and where some met their tragic deaths in They could see plainly where the trees had been cut down and limbs cut off of others ten or twelve feet above the ground, showing how deep the snow must have been when they camped on it.

Later he took up a claim on Poor Man creek, finding dirt which paid him thirty dollars a day with pick and pan. After working the claim for a month the heavy snow drove him out and he went back to Nevada City, where he spent the winter. Next spring he found a claim from which. In company with three other miners he engaged in prospecting on Kanaha creek. They struck a claim where they took out fifty dollars a day. As soon as their grub was gone they went back to Nevada City and brought out twelve hundred pounds of supplies on seven pack horses.

They found their claim had been jumped, so they struck out down the creek and struck another claim even richer than the first. On July 4, , the four of them took out over six hundred dollars. They averaged about one hundred dollars a day. My father's partners became dissatisfied and thought they could find a richer ground, so he bought them out and worked the claim until late in the fall of Downieville, the nearest post office, was twelve miles distant by mountain trail.

He worked on a hotel and was paid ten dollars a day. After the hotel was built he went to Sacramento and from there to San Francisco, where he bought a ticket for Panama. He had to pay sixteen dollars for the use of a mule to ride twenty-six miles across the isthmus to connect with a boat.

After he had ridden about two-thirds of the way he overtook a miner, who offered him eight dollars for the use of the mule for the remaining eight miles, so father walked the rest of the way. He had to pay a fare of ten dollars on a rowboat which took him to the Atlantic side of the isthmus. The natives were having a revolution and told the Californians to keep off the streets so they wouldn't get hurt.

However, the Americans wanted to see what was going on, so one of them was killed, as well as a number of natives. The American consul sent out to the Cherokee and Ohio, which were anchored in the stream, and got a brass six-pounder and an iron cannon. He put these so he could sweep the street and told the natives that if they fought any more or killed any more Americans he would turn the cannon loose, so they decided to quit fighting.

He bought a steerage ticket for New York for fifty dollars. The first cabin ticket was seventy-five dollars. After he got on the boat he paid the purser five dollars extra to sit at the first cabin table and have a cabin like the first class passengers.

The Ohio was a sidewheeler and there were about two hundred returning gold miners aboard. At Havana they transferred to the Georgia for New Orleans. In the Crescent city he paid sixteen dollars for a ticket to St. Louis and made the trip of about twelve-hundred miles on the Patrick Henry. At St. Louis he took passage on a small boat called the Lewis F. Linn, for Brunswick, the great tobacco trading point on the Missouri, traveling with Washington Leach, who had been his companion in the mines of California and on the returning sea voyage.

At Brunswick he hired a rig to drive to Linneus, where he had left mother. When he arrived there he found that his father-in-law had sold out and that mother had gone to Jive with Uncle Newton. He hired a man to drive him out to the Newton place. He bought a house and lot for three hundred dollars and got a job as carpenter at a dollar and a quarter a day.

In the party were father's cousin, Ambrose Newton, who brought his wife and three children. He had two wagons, with four yoke of oxen to each, and was accompanied by three young men, who came along to work for their board. Father had one wagon, three yoke of oxen and two cows.

In his wagon were himself, mother, Sarah, the baby, and a young man named Washington Ward, who went along to work for his hoard. The members of the train chose father as their captain because of his previous experience in crossing the plains. The emigrants drove to St. Joseph, Missouri, and thence up the river, which they crossed at Council Bluffs. They took the south side of the Platte.

A large party of Pawnee Indians accompanied them almost to Ash Hollow. There my father and Mr. Wiley went on a hunting expedition. Father killed a big buffalo and they loaded their horses with meat. When they were hunting a hail storm came up which was so severe that the cattle couldn't face it. They turned around and drifted with the storm. On the Bear river in Utah six saddle horses were stolen.

Father lost a good horse. He said that when he and Fowler were looking for the horses they met an Indian on a cayuse,while his squaw was mounted on a big roan horse. Father had a rifle with inlaid silver work and the Indian tried to take it. Father pulled out his Colt revolver and the Indian changed his mind, and the last father saw of him and the squaw they were making their horses go as fast as they could. The next day the party arrived at Steamboat Springs, where an Englishman had a trading station.

After crossing the Malheur river they went down the Snake and struck Burnt river at a point where Huntington was afterward built. They passed through the Powder River valley below the place where Baker City is now located and there father suffered from blood poisoning, which endangered his life. After coming into the Grande Ronde valley they passed Medical lake and in the Blue mountains stayed over night at Lee's encampment, now Bingham Springs. Then they proceeded down the Wild Horse through what is now the Umatilla Indian reservation, finding Indians there who were raising corn and potatoes.

After reaching Deschutes they made their way down Ten-Mile creek and thence to Tygh valley. They passed through the Barlow tollgate and down Laurel Hill, soon afterward coming to the Big Sandy valley. On September 9 they reached Foster's famous ranch and on the 11th crossed the Willamette at Portland on a capstan and two horses. In father and Fred Flora took a contract to get out timbers and build a barn for Captain Doty in Yamhill county.

Father next built a granary for Mr. McLeod on Tualatin plains. They paid him seven dollars a day and he took his pay in flour, which he sold in Portland. From Tualatin plains he moved to the Long Tom, in Beaten county, where he bought, for three hundred dollars, a quarter section.

Forty acres of the tract had been fenced and there was a good house on the place. Father bought a land entry of one hundred and sixty acres for one hundred and twenty dollars and took up the adjoining quarter section. The first loom on the Long Tom was constructed by father, who built it for Mrs. He was paid forty dollars for the job. Ferguson wove homespun cloth. He bought a new wagon, a span of mules and ninety head of cattle. He hired John Florence to drive the stock over the Barlow trail to the Dennis Maloney place, near the present site of Dufur.

Father traded our place to Mrs. Upton for two large mares, Pet and Pigeon. Afterward father moved to Eight-Mile creek, purchasing a farm from "Big Steve" Edwards, and there mother died in the fall of , leaving two sons and two daughters, one a baby less than a year old.

The hard winter of nearly wiped father off the map financially. He had only thirty head of stock left when the snow went off in the spring. Susan Griffin, my mother's sister, died shortly alter we children went there. Father and Fred Flora had started in the spring of with a herd of cattle for the Orofino mines in Idaho. My sister did the housework. When J. Broadwell bought the place my sister Sarah and I stayed with him for two years.

My brother Willie went to Idaho with my father, who purchased a mine in the Boise basin and later moved to Rocky Bar, in Alturas county, that state. He was absent two years and brought home fourteen hundred dollars. He built a mill on Fifteen-Mile creek near the Meadows, also owning a mill on the Columbia, opposite Wind river, and this he later sold to Joseph T.

While operating the plant he built a small steamboat to handle the lumber. After disposing of his mills father worked for a time at his trade and aided in constructing the shoe factory in North Dalles. In father married Mrs. Elizabeth Herbert, a widow, who had two children: Mrs. Jane Sherer, deceased; and George A. Herbert, now a resident of Baker, Oregon.

The mother of these children passed away at The Dalles and father's death occurred at Cascade Locks, Oregon, in My sister Sarah, the oldest of the family, was born in Missouri in On May 10, , she became the wife of William Frizzell, and her demise occurred in at Cascade Locks. My brother William was born in Benton county, Oregon, in and is now living in Oakland, California. I was the third child and my full name is Daniel Lycurgus Cates. My sister Susan was born February 14, , in Wasco county, Oregon.

She became the wife of W. Wilson, a well known attorney of Portland, Oregon, and died February 14, Cates attended the public schools at The Dalles and one of his instructors was Professor S. From until he was in the employ of his father, who at that time was operating a saw mill above Cascade Locks, where the town of Wyeth is now located.

His lumber yard at The Dalles was managed by Daniel L. Cates, who afterward became a bookkeeper for John H. Larsen, a dealer in wool and hides. Cates remained until , when he was appointed a deputy under George Herbert, sheriff of Wasco county, and acted in that capacity for four years. In he was elected sheriff and served for two years, thoroughly justifying the trust reposed in him. In August, , he located at Cascade Locks, opening a general store, which he conducted during the construction of the locks.

About five hundred men were at work and in the locks were completed by J. At that time Mr. Cates disposed of the business and established a drug store, of which he was the proprietor for two years. Crossing the Columbia river, he purchased a tract of three hundred and twenty acres in Skamania county, Washington, and applied himself to the task of clearing the land. He cut down the timber, which he sawed into logs, and disposed of them at a good figure. A few years later he sold the ranch and in November, , returned to The Dalles.

Prosperity had attended his various undertakings and for a time he lived retired. In he was prevailed upon to reenter the arena of public affairs and has since been city recorder. His duties are discharged with characteristic thoroughness and fidelity and his continued retention in the office proves that his services are appreciated.

On October 9, , Mr. Cates is the ninth in line of descent from Jan Stryker, who was born in Holland in and emigrated from Ruinen, a village in the province of Drenthe, with his wife, two sons and four daughters, arriving at New Amsterdam in The mother of these children was Lambertje Seubering, who died several years after the family came to America. She survived her husband, who was a man of prominence in colonial days. In he was elected chief magistrate of Midworet and according to the Colonial History of New York" he was a member of the embassy sent from New Amsterdam to the lord mayors in Holland.

The history also states that he became a representative in the general assembly on April 10, , a member of the Hempstead convention of , and was commissioned captain of a military company on October 25, His brother, who also came to this country, was named Jacobus Garretsen Stryker. Jan Stryker and his first wife had a large family. She died June 17, , and his demise occurred June 11, He was high sheriff of Kings county, Long Island; judge of the court from until , and was made captain of a foot company in On June 1, , he purchased four thousand acres of land on Millstone river in Somerset county, New Jersey.

It does not appear that he ever lived on this property but his sons, Jacob and Barends, and his grandsons, the four sons of Jan, removed from Flatbush to New Jersey. Pieter and Annetje Barends Stryker had eleven children. Jan Stryker, their third child, was born August 6, , and in married Margarita Schenck. She was baptized June 2, , and married February 17, Her death occurred July 15, , and her husband passed away August 17, He was a member of the Kings County militia.

Jan Stryker had nine children by his first wife and five by the second. Pieter Stryker, the eldest child of his first wife, was born September 14, , at Flatbush, Long island, and about married Antje Deremer. Death summoned him on December 28, He had eleven children by his first wife and one by the second. His son, John Stryker, the eighth child of his first union, was born March 2, , and became captain of the Somerset County militia but was afterwards attached to the state troops.

His marriage with Lydia Cornell was solemnized November 13, , and on March 25, , he responded to the final summons. His wife was born March 15, , and died November 4, John and Lydia Cornell Stryker were the parents of ten children. James I. She was born November 5, , and died about in Cayuga county, New York, while his demise occurred December 14, Their family numbered eight children.

Stryker died December 2, , in Vancouver, Washington, and her husband's death occurred in that city on December 21, In their family were four daughters, of whom Alice is the eldest. By her marriage to Daniel L. Cates she became the mother of four children. The fourth child died in infancy.

Cates takes a keen interest in fraternal affairs and is a charter member of The Dalles Lodge of the Knights of Pythias, in which he has filled all of the chairs. In all matters of citizenship he is loyal, progressive and public-spirited and his personal qualities are such as make for popularity.

Clarke Publishing Company - ] Chrisman, Levi No public official of Wasco county enjoys a higher reputation than Levi Chrisman, who has served continuously as sheriff for a period of twenty-two years, and represents the third generation of the family in Oregon. In , when their son Campbell E. Margaret Chrisman there passed away in and her husband remained on the ranch until He then sold the place and came to The Dalles, where he lived retired until his death a few years later.

Campbell E. Chrisman was educated in the public schools of Dayton and remained at home until , when he moved to The Dalles. For a time he leased the ranch near Dufur and about purchased the property. He cultivated the farm until and then sold the tract. Returning to The Dalles, he became a dealer in grain and conducted a grocery and a feed store. Catering to both the wholesale and retail trades, he established a large patronage and continued the business until , when he retired.

He served on the school board and manifested a deep interest in matters touching the welfare and progress of his community. Her parents, John E. Her father was a Christian minister and one of the early circuit riders of Oregon, traveling on horseback to isolated districts in order to spread the Gospel. He passed away early in the '70s and his widow survived him by ten years.

The demise of Campbell E. Chrisman occurred May 15, , at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Taylor, a resident of The Dalles, and on February 20, , his widow was called to her final rest. To their union were born seven children. Lulu, the eldest, was born on the homestead near Dufur and is the widow of Henry Taylor. She has two children: Mrs.

Lulu P. Hugh Chrisman is sheriff of Sherman county and has been the incumbent of the office for eight years. Levi is the next of the family and his brother Frank lives in Oakland, California. Emma, the seventh in order of birth, died in infancy. For four years he was a railroad employe and in ventured in business for himself at The Dalles.

In partnership with his brother Frank he opened a meat market, which he conducted successfully for sixteen years, also dealing in live stock. He was elected sheriff of Wasco county on the republican ticket in and his long retention in this office is an eloquent testimonial to the quality of his service. In the discharge of his important duties he is conscientious, efficient and fearless and during his tenure of office the percentage of crime in the country has been appreciably lowered.

His record is unsullied and in length of service has never been equaled by any other sheriff in the state. Chrisman married Miss Edna C. Martin, who was born in Illinois, and died February 13, She had become the mother of five children. Edna, the first born, is the wife of Robert P. Johnson, of Portland, Oregon, and has two daughters, Margaret and Virginia.

The other children of Mr. Chrisman are: Mrs. Neva M. Rasmussen, of Seattle, Washington; Robert, who was admitted to the bar in and is practicing in Wallowa, Oregon; Cecil, who is a junior at the University of Oregon and is preparing to enter the legal profession; and Elsie, who was graduated from the high school at The Dalles and is taking a course in a Portland business college. The children are natives of The Dalles and all have received the benefit of a good education.

In the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias he has filled all of the chairs and is also affiliated with the Woodmen of the World and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He has a wide acquaintance and draws his friends from all walks of life, possessing those qualities which inspire strong and enduring regard. Clarke Publishing Company - ] Clausen, F.

Agricultural progress in the Columbia River Valley has received marked impetus from the enterprising spirit and systematic labors of F. Clausen, a pioneer wheat grower of Wasco county and one of its large land owners. Having accumulated a sum more than sufficient for his needs, he is spending the evening of life in ease and comfort and resides in an attractive home at The Dalles. He was born February 1, , in Kolding, Denmark, and his parents, Nicolai and Karen Clausen, were life-long residents of that country.

His father's demise occurred in and the mother long survived him, passing away in They had eight children, four of whom attained years of maturity: F. Clausen received a common school education and laid aside his textbooks at the age of sixteen, as his assistance was needed on the home farm. His country was engaged in war with Germany, which took the province of Schleswig-Holstein as indemnity from Denmark.

The family lived near the boundary line dividing the two countries and two brothers of F. Clausen served in the Danish army. Being unwilling to swear allegiance to Germany, he left his native land and on April 7, , sailed from Hamburg on a vessel which bore him to New York city. He then purchased a ticket for San Francisco, California, and for a period of four years was engaged in dairying near Sacramento.

In partnership with his brother James, he operated a wheat ranch in the Sacramento valley for two years and then decided to migrate to Oregon. Selling his interest in the ranch to his brother, he came to The Dalles in the spring of and soon afterward filed on a homestead on the Deschutes river, twenty miles southeast of the town.

He proved up on the land and later secured a timber claim. As fast as his resources permitted Mr. Clausen increased his holdings and is now the owner of three thousand acres of land in Wasco county. A tract of one thousand acres is devoted to the growing of grain and the balance is used for pasture and stock farming.

Endowed with keen powers of discernment, Mr. Clausen was the first man to recognize the fact that grain could be produced in this locality and the old cattle and sheep raisers were averse to the idea, saying that the land could be utilized only for grazing purposes owing to the dryness of the soil. In he planted his first crop of wheat, which was destroyed by grasshoppers, but the next season he had better luck and in forty-five years of farming has had only one failure.

His equipment is up-to-date and the fields are divided by well kept fences. A modern house has been erected on the ranch, which is further improved with substantial barns and other outbuildings. The place is well irrigated and water from the spring is pumped to the house and other buildings.

Clausen follows diversified farming and has found that the best results are obtained by summer fallowing. The soil yields good crops and he keeps about fifty head of horses for the farm work. His cattle and hogs are of high grade and he owns about one hundred and twenty-five head of stock, which he allows to run in the wheat fields after the grain is harvested.

Every detail of the work has been carefully planned and the ranch has proven a profitable investment because it is operated on an economic basis. Clausen is a firm believer in scientific methods of a culture and has demonstrated their value as factors in productiveness. In he leased the ranch to his sons, James and Otto, who are successfully managing the place and also own valuable stock farms.

Since his retirement Mr. Clausen has lived at The Dalles in a desirable home, which he purchased in , and during the busy season supervises the work on his farm. He has proven his faith in the future of The Dalles by judicious investments in real estate and is a stockholder in the Wrentham and Columbia Warehouse Companies, while he also owns a half-interest in two substantial business blocks, which were recently erected in the city.

It was during their honeymoon that Mr. Clausen made the trip to Oregon, traveling to The Dalles in a wagon drawn by four horses. Theirs proved an ideal union, which was terminated by the death of Mrs. Clausen on October 17, In their family were eight children, all of whom were born on the old homestead in Wasco county and received liberal educational advantages. Arthur, the first born, died at the age of six years. James is married and has one child, Edna.

Cora is deceased. Edna completed a course in The Dalles high school and was graduated from a nurses' training school maintained by one of the largest hospitals in Cleveland, Ohio. She is anaesthesian at The Dalles Hospital and also acts as housekeeper for her father.

Otto is married and has two children, Fred and Virginia. During the World war he enlisted in the United States Engineers Corps, becoming sergeant of his company, and later was promoted to the position of chief engineer. He spent two years overseas and is now filling a responsible position in Chicago, Illinois.

Emma supplemented her high school education by attendance at Reed College in Portland, Oregon, from which she was graduated. For two years she was a student at the University of Washington and is now dietician at Dornbacher Hospital in Portland. Clara, the youngest child, died at the age of seven years. His fraternal relations also extend to the Woodmen of the World. For eight years he was one of the commissioners of Wasco county and during his tenure of office the county built and paid for the finest courthouse in the state, with the exception of the one in Portland.

A strong advocate of educational advancement, Mr. Clausen was a member of the school board of his district for twenty-four years and has always evinced a keen desire to cooperate in movements for the general good. A man of stable purpose and marked strength of character, he has sown wisely and well and his life has been a succession of harvests.

For nearly a half century he has resided in Wasco county, where he has a wide acquaintance, and enjoys to the fullest extent the esteem and confidence of all with whom he has been associated. Clarke Publishing Company - ] Collins, John Wesley John Wesley Collins is one of the most active young business men of The Dalles, where he is conducting a prosperous wall paper and paint business. He was born in Jefferson county, Tennessee, in , his parents being William H.

John W. Collins' first work was in a general merchandise store in his home town, but he did not find the pursuit to his liking and remained in that employ for only thirteen months. He acted in that capacity for six years. In he determined to start out in business on his own account and having saved considerable money from his earnings and made many friends in the trade, he looked around for a location and after visiting The Dalles at once decided to cast his lot in the "cherry town," and renting a store, established business here.

After paying his rent and equipping his place he had left as a working capital just one hundred dollars, yet by he was the owner of the only wall paper and decorating concern in the city and was occupying a handsome store on the main business street, with a stock of wall paper and paint fully paid for and worth seven thousand dollars.

Moreover, he is giving employment to eight expert painters and paper hangers. He takes contracts for all kinds of painting and decorating work and has broadened the scope of his business by establishing a picture frame department.

He also sells paint and paper and many decorative articles and the business is a growing one. Collins was married to Miss Ruby S. Pickens, a native of North Carolina, whose parents are now farming in Oregon. They have two children, Louelder and William Wesley. Collins is a member of the Chamber of Commerce and is active in support of all progressive civic interests.

Fraternally he is an Odd Fellow and a Yeoman. He enjoys the high regard of his brethren in these orders and has won a well deserved reputation as a reliable and progressive business man and valuable citizen. Among the most interesting features of the Oregon Daily Journal are the articles of Fred Lockley, who wrote the following account of the life of John B.

I asked of Mr. McLoughlin sent him up to Stuart lake in British Columbia, to bring down the furs from their post there. He was given command of ten three-ton boats. He piloted the leading boat himself and the others followed the lead of his boat. These boats made the round trip each summer from Stuart lake to Fort Vancouver. Coming down the Columbia, they shot the rapids at the cascades, but on the return trip they had to make a portage there. They carried their loads around the cascades at what is now Cascade locks and towed their boats or carried them around the swift water.

At the big eddy, sometimes called The Dalles rapids, they made another portage, carrying their loads clear beyond Celilo falls. They put their boats into the river above Celilo and paddled them to the mouth of the Okanogan, where they put their trade goods on pack horses and took them over the divide to the waters of the Frazier river, where they had boats in which they took the goods to Stuart lake. Father stayed with this work for some years - in fact, until , when they transferred him to Fort Walla Walla, now called Wallula.

Spaulding down the river to Fort Vancouver. This was immediately after the killing of Dr. Marcus Whitman, Mrs. Whitman and the other white people at Wai-lat-pu mission. The Indians fired at my father and the other two men from the bank but did not hit them. They brought the news of the massacre to the Willamette valley, and soon the whole valley was humming with excitement like a hive of angry bees.

My father and Champagne joined their own people from French prairie to go up to Wai-lat-pu to punish the Indians. They fought with the volunteers from French prairie until the Cayuse war was over. She was at Dr. McLoughlin's mill on the island at what they sometimes called Willamette falls when I was born on April 27, , and when I was a few weeks old she returned to our place here.

My mother's name was Sophia Berchier. She pronounced it "Bushey. She lived to be ninety-four years old. When she was coming here by the old Hudson's Bay trail my brother Ed, who retired from the Portland police force recently after forty years of service, was born. The Indians attacked the party when Ed was one day old, so mother had to grab him up, catch her horse and get away from there as fast as the animal could travel. In the fall of he purchased from the Hudson's Bay Company a boat which he operated on the river between The Dalles and Fort Vancouver.

He took emigrants from The Dalles to Oregon City while the men of the party drove their cattle overland to the Willamette valley. Father had the contract to transport the soldiers from Vancouver to The Dalles in , when the United States government built the fort here.

After this for three years he stayed on his land at Crates Point and farmed the place. In the summer of he operated his boat between Celilo and Wallula. Father acted as pilot on the first boat than ran from Celilo to Wallula and thence to the mouth of the Snake river. I believe Captain Gray was skipper of the boat.

After serving as pilot on this river for a while father returned to his ranch, later going to the newly discovered gold mines in Idaho, near where Lewiston now is. Father and mother had fourteen children, seven of whom are now living. In 1 was riding for Ben Snipe, whose horses ranged all over the Yakima country and along the Columbia. He had about twenty thousand head of cattle. In my horse fell with me and broke in a lot of my ribs, so I came to The Dalles and went to work fur John Michaelbach, who ran a butcher shop here in those days.

In my brother Ed and I purchased the shop. Ed soon went on the Portland police force. I ran the butcher shop for some years and sold out when I was appointed a member of the police force here. He was day man and I had the night shift. There were thirty-two saloons here then. Yes, I have had to take guns away from hundreds of men. You see, when they get drunk they hardly know what they are doing and they frequently get ugly and pull their guns.

If I didn't take the gun away they might kill someone, or someone might shoot them in self-defense. I served on the force over twenty years. Yes, I have lots of friends. The lawbreakers and bootleggers don't like me, but the wolves and coyotes don't like a watchdog, and for the same reason. Yes, when Gibbons, the city marshal was shot and killed I was appointed in his place.

Did I ever have any fights? Look at the knuckles of my right hand. I couldn't tell you how many times I have broken my knuckles fighting with drunken men or gangs of men who resisted arrest. No, I never used a gun or a billy. One morning at about five o'clock I was called to a saloon to stop a fight between Frank Summers, a gambler, and a small man.

Summers, who weighed about three hundred pounds, was holding the small man with one arm around his neck and beating him with the other arm. I managed to separate the two men and dragged Summers outside the saloon. While I was taking Summers to the jail he promised to behave if I would take him to his room instead, which I did, and left him there. In the melee Summers lost his hat and a man named Gentry took it up to his room. The gambler told Gentry he was going to get his gun and kill me.

Meanwhile I had gone downtown and was told later on that Summers was back in the saloon and boasting of what he intended to do. I returned to the saloon and when I reached the swinging door Summers opened fire.

The first bullet hit me in the left breast, an inch above the heart, and penetrated my body. I grabbed a heavy chair of oak, using it as a shield, and closed with Summers, who fired two more shots before I was able to knock him down with the chair. I took away Summers' gun, handing it to my deputy, who had arrived on the scene by that time, and then fainted from loss of blood.

They took me to a hospital and probed for the bullet, but the probe ran clear through me and when they took off my shirt the bullet fell to the floor. I had to stay in the hospital for over a month. The fight took place at The Dalles in and Summers was sent to the penitentiary for a term of five years. Crate was married. Bill engaged in farming until He then sold the place and migrated to Oregon, arriving at Hood River on November 15, There he spent the winter and in the spring of came to Wasco county, taking up a preemption claim and homestead of one hundred and sixty acres near Mosier.

He removed a portion of the timber, which he cut, and sold the wood. Bill cultivated the ranch until his demise in and his wife passed away a few days later. They had ten children, seven of whom survive: Mrs. Mary Britten, who makes her home at The Dalles; Mrs. Barbara Dunsmore, of Mosier; Mrs. Louise Shepard, a resident of Oakland, that state; and Henry A.

Bill, also of Oakland. In the family of Mr. Crate were two children. Violet was born in and died in infancy. The other daughter, Anna Lucille, who was born at The Dalles and has become a well known concert singer, is the wife of James W. Purcell, who is manager for the Ellison-White Chautauqua Company and travels extensively in the interests of the firm. Purcell reside in Portland, Oregon, and are the parents of two sons: James W.

A lifelong resident of Oregon, Mr. Crate has an intimate knowledge of the history of the state, to which he is deeply attached, and his conversation is enriched with interesting reminiscences of the past. He has been loyal to every trust reposed in him and faithful to every duty and the years have strengthened his position in public esteem. His mother was reared in Greeneville, Tennessee, and among her schoolmates was Andrew Johnson, who became the seventeenth president of the United States.

Alexander E. Davis enlisted in the Confederate army, offering to take the place of his brother, who had several children, and was killed during the siege of Vicksburg. His widow after remarried, becoming the wife of S. Moser in , and five children were born to them: William A. Moser, of Starbuck, Washington. An only child, James A. Davis had replaced in the Confederate service. The favorite playground of James A. Davis was in the vicinity of the mill owned by his uncle, with whom he often rode on the carriage that conveyed logs to the saw, and when a boy of eight he had the misfortune to lose a leg in this sawmill, which was in operation at Greeneville.

In spite of that handicap he walked regularly to the nearest schoolhouse, a distance of three and a half miles, often trudging through the snow in the winter. Russell, and later took a postgraduate course under the same teacher, who had migrated to Roseburg, Oregon. The change proved beneficial to Mrs.

In Sheridan, Yamhill county, Oregon, Mr. Davis began his career as an educator, remaining there for two years, and in proceeded to Roseburg, where his studies were directed by Professor J. Homer, now a member of the faculty of the Oregon Agricultural College at Corvallis. For more than twenty years Mr.

Davis engaged in teaching, constantly advancing in the profession, and was principal of the high school at Oakland, Oregon, for two years, during which he established the first school library in Douglas county. He had charge of the Yoncalla high school for four years and came to Wasco county in For two years he was principal of the high school at Antelope and in came to The Dalles. He was appointed deputy county assessor by J. Koonts and acted in that capacity until , when he became assessor, filling the position for four years.

In he was reelected to the office, in which he has since been retained, and has served for a longer period than any other county assessor in Oregon. Davis has devoted deep thought and study to his work and enjoys the confidence of the voters and taxpayers of Wasco county. Methodical and conscientious, he has made his department a model of efficiency, inaugurating the system whereby assessment notices and tax receipts are made out at one time, and this system, under various forms, is now in use throughout the state.

In commercial affairs he has also demonstrated his ability, opening an insurance office in , and soon established a profitable business. In October, , Mr. Bridges was a Methodist minister and one of the early circuit riders of Linn county. Later he went to Missouri, where he remained until his demise, but his wife passed away in Oregon.

To their union were born thirteen children, seven of whom survive: Mrs. Emma Miller; Mrs. Laura Applegate; W. Bridges, a resident of Drain, Oregon; Mrs. Amanda Smith; Mrs. Ruth Davis; Isom C. Bridges, of Oregon City; and Mrs. Martha Looney, who lives in Jefferson, Oregon. Davis became the parents of four sons. Harold L. Percy V. Dudley Quentin, also a native of Oakland, born December 16, , enlisted in the United States navy and was in the service of his country for three years. Richard Harding, who was born September 6, , and is a junior in the local high school, has a talent for music and plays in the high school band and also in an orchestra.

During the World War, Mr. Bridges devoted much of his time to patriotic activities and furthered the success of the various drives. In politics he is a stanch republican and for three years was clerk of The Dalles school board. He takes a keen interest in fraternal affairs and is a past noble grand of five lodges. In the Woodmen of the World and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows he has filled all of the chairs and is also connected with the Neighbors of Woodcraft.

His parents were J. The son Leon was educated in his home town, passing through consecutive grades to the high school. When he was nineteen years of age he determined to go west and in arrived in Oregon. Devoting all of his spare time to study, and being a young man of steady habits and thoroughness of purpose, he soon mastered the business and was put in charge of the company's retail and installation department.

He occupied that position until the company was reorganized in and closed out the department of which he had had charge. Dawson then purchased the manufacturing, supply and installation department of the company and has since conducted business under the name of The Dalles Electric Works. He carries a large stock of electric supplies and house necessities, manufactures all manner of electrical things to meet needs of this character and installs anything wanted in the electrical line.

His showroom on East Second street displays a large stock of electric fixtures, household appliances and similar goods. He makes a specialty of farm installations and is the agent of the Delco-Light System for light, heat and power. He has thus given to the farmers of Wasco all of the advantages of a city dweller in the line of electric conveniences and he ranks as a master in his chosen line. Dawson was married in to Miss Cora V.

Joles, whose father was a retired business man of The Dalles. To this marriage have been born two sons, Harold and Kenneth, who are now grade pupils in The Dalles schools. Dawson has never taken any active part in politics but is well known in connection with fraternal interests, being a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Woodmen of the World and the Knights of Pythias.

He is likewise a member of the Masonic fraternity, in which he has attained the Knights Templar degree, and he is a Noble of the Mystic Shrine. He ranks with the most popular business men of central Oregon and has seen several competitive firms establish business but fail to attain success, for the trade is given to him. He has been prominent in support of all civic matters relating to the welfare of The Dalles and his cooperation can be counted upon to further any movement for the public good.

Office-holding is not always a recommendation to a man. There are those who seek office and those whom the office seeks. The subject of thin biography is one of the latter class, and has, almost continuously, since attaining his majority, held official position. He was born in Washington County, Ohio, September 4, His father was of Scotch-Trish and his mother of English descent.

He came to Oregon with his parents in , crossing the plains with an ox team and settling in Linn County, near Lebanon, on a donation claim. Two weeks after their arrival the father died, leaving a widowed mother with six children, three girls and three boys, O.

Denny being the oldest of the boys. The responsibility and chief labor of improving the farm and supporting the family devolved upon him and his mother, and, with the assistance of the younger children, they struggled on to the accomplishment of both.

Meantime he attended the Lebanon Academy and obtained an education sufficient to qualify him for teaching a common country school. He taught six months and then attended Willamette University, at Salem, for two years. He then began reading law with Hon. Holbrook, at Oregon City. That gentleman being called East, on business connected with the National Sanitary Commission, of which he was chief agent for Oregon, he prescribed a course for his student, furnished him with text books and sent him to Salem, where he joined a class, consisting of the late C.

Curl, Thomas Caton, H. Gehr and William Waldo. The class recited to Hon. Grover, at present United Senator, for one year, when they each entered law firms. Denny went in the firm of Hons. Harding, and after being admitted to the bar in he went to The Dalles, in Wasco county, and began practice alone. In September of the same year he was appointed, by Governor A. Gibbs, County Judge of that county, which position he held one year.

He then went to Idaho Territory to make collections for merchants at The Dalles, resigning his office to do so. The business detaining him, he opened an office at Centreville and practiced law for a short time, with marked success.

He then returned to The Dalles, and at the following election was nominated for the office of County Judge on the Republican ticket, and elected by a large majority. At the expiration of his term he was renominated and, although the county went largely Democratic, he was only beaten eight votes. Denny gained great credit for his administration of county affairs while he held the office of Judge, the bonds of the county advancing from fifty cents on the dollar to par value during his term.

He was married to Mrs. Gertrude J. White, an accomplished widow with one child, a daughter, in He then removed to California and located in San Jose, where he practiced law one year, when he returned to Oregon and, locating in Portland, he again began the practice of his profession. In he was elected Police Judge for the city of Portland, and was re-elected in on the Republican ticket.

During his last term he was tendered the Consulship, at Amoy, China, by President Grant, which office he declined, not having been an applicant. In he was appointed Collector of Internal Revenue for Oregon and Alaska by President Grant, when he resigned the office of Police Judge and entered upon the duties of his new position. He entered upon the duties of that responsible position April 1st, , and still continues in the office, although at this date he is visiting friends and attending to official duties in Oregon.

Denny was appointed to the office which he now holds, at the request of Hon. William M. Evarts, then Secretary of State of the United States, without his having made application for the same and without his knowledge. He holds high relations with other foreign Ministers and Consuls to the Chinese Empire and is held in high esteem by them and also by the Chinese authorities. No higher mark of confidence could be given him than the fact that the whole Pacific delegation to Congress recently recommended him for promotion to Minister to Peking, a position still more distinguished than that which he is now holding.

The writer of this brief sketch has known Judge Donny from his early boyhood, and is cognizant of the facts herein stated. His early struggles, his after triumphs, and his still promising future, are themes upon which much more could be written. But closing here, we leave him to still further "Cast for himself the sounding line In the deep ocean of futurity.

Team] Dick, Frank G. Frank G. Dick, an outstanding figure in legal circles of The Dalles, has been particularly successful as a trial lawyer, becoming well known in this connection, and is also classed with the leading agriculturists of Wasco county. His life from an early age has been one of unremitting industry and he deserves much credit for what he has accomplished. He was born March 10, , in Polk county, Iowa, and his parents were Franz and Franie O'Brien, the former a native of Germany, and of Portuguese descent, while the latter was born in Dublin, Ireland.

His father became an able lawyer. In he came to the United States but returned to Europe the same year. Dick never saw his father and his mother died in , when he was a child of six, leaving him in the care of her relatives. Dick was reared by a family named O'Brien and obtained his early education in the public schools of Iowa, which he attended during the morning session.

In the afternoon he was obliged to work and this program was continued until his grammar school course was completed. For one and a half years he was a high school pupil and in came to The Dalles where he pursued a special course of study under the tutelage of Rev. Clevenger, a former teacher at Princeton University.

He obtained a position as clerk in the drug store of George C. Judge Bennett has passed away and his partner, N. Sinnott, is now a member of congress. Dick also took a correspondence law course and in May, , was admitted to the bar at Pendleton, Oregon. For fifteen years he has engaged in general practice at The Dalles and during that period has handled at least fifty per cent of the criminal cases tried in Wasco county as well as in several adjoining counties in eastern Oregon and Washington.

He is a formidable adversary in legal combat, marshaling his evidence with the precision and skill of a military commander, and seldom fails to convince his audience of the justice of the cause he pleads. His offices are located in the Vogt building and his clientele is extensive and lucrative.

Several years ago Mr. Dick began to invest his savings in Wasco county land and he now has a wheat ranch of seventeen hundred acres. Scientific methods are utilized in its cultivation and he also owns a desirable home in The Dalles. Later they moved to Nebraska and about migrated to Oregon. Cramer engaged in farming near Forest Grove and was also a cigarmaker.

There he began the manufacture of cigars and also established a factory of the same kind at Oregon City. In he transferred his industrial operations to The Dalles and operated a cigar factory in this city until his death in His widow has reached the venerable age of eighty-two years and still resides at The Dalles. Her daughter Louise was educated in Oregon and became a dressmaker.

Endowed with more than average ability, she was placed in charge of the dressmaking department in the Williams store at The Dallas and filled the position until her marriage. Dick have four sons all of whom are natives of The Dalles. William was born in , John H. Dick belongs to The Dalles Lodge of the Knights of Pythias of which he is past chancellor commander and his interest in the development and prosperity of the city is denoted by his affiliation with the Chamber of Commerce.

UTAH STATE COLORADO STATE BETTING LINE

Standing are Dave Lardinais and Richard Buckenmeyer. The medicine is shipped to the foreign mis- sions. Mike Fosnaugk proposes the gualijications of his favorite candidate to Karen Kirk and feanne Nalodka. Craig LaBay and Harley Andr- zejewski express their points of view. Mary of Mercy RSM. Under the direction of Sr.

Adolph SND, members of the German Club participate in activities designed to enrich their knowl- edge of German culture and geography such as attending the International Insti- tute which familiarizes members with Ger- man songs and dances. Members are elected into the National Hon- or Society by the faculty.

Students elected must have the necessary scholastic require- ments, as well as outstanding Leadership, Service and Character. The organization has used as its theme for the year, "the development of the arts for leisure. A board of nine faculty members comprise thefaculty committee, with Mrs.

Velma C. Pfeiffer act- ing as the advisor. Kathleen SND, moderates monthly French Club meetings, planned to promote a deeper interest in the people and customs of France. French club ofcers proudb di'splay French valentines designed by club mem- bers. Chris Seibenick feels the one she selects is very appropriate to send to their friends in France.

German club members conkr on the customs of the German people as de- picted in the pictures. Clarisena RSM, acquaints members with various educational fields by observing ele- mentary cl a s s r o o m procedure in area schools. The Chemistry Club, guided by Sr.

Flo- rian, OSF, supplements the student's chem- ical knowledge through the presentation of recent improvements and new theories. The Spanish Club, moderated by Sr. Highlighting the year is the Saturnalia at Christmas time and the state convention in Columbus.

The Radio Club, supervised by Sr. Tere- sita, OSF, develops interest in electronics through practical experience and provides a means to obtain a license. In order to gain valuable experience, Mary Ball takes notes on theprocess ofcalculating grades as Karoll Rowe observes one ofthe daihz procedures she will perform aher four years ofcollege preparation for the teaching profession.

David Kolodziejczyk demonstrates to Radio Club members the proper way to speak into the microphone ofa short-wave radio system. L Q if lie? Rahlh Trease and john Wozny learn the intricacies of a gyroseope, as an aid to th eir eh enzieal studies. The Romans honored the Saturn, the earth goal in thanksgiving for a bountiful harvest. Some modern Christmas customs stern from the Roman Satur- nalia. Page 75 Encouraging interest in the field of mathematics is the goal of the Math Club.

Under the supervision of Sr. Teresita OSF, members took a field trip through the University of Toledo computer center, and heard many fine speakers at regularly sched- uled meetings. Obtaining a greater knowledge of the functions of science in daily life is stressed by the Biology Club, directed by Sr. Blandina OSF. To improve the club's organization and activities, a constitution has been written and ratified by members.

The basic function of the Camera Club is to develop skill in the use of the camera. Aided by Sr. Lucilla RSM, members learn the latest methods in developing and processing photos. To acquaint themselves with the different oppor- tunities open to registered nurses, the Future Nurses of America tour area hospitals and attend lectures given by key people in the medical field.

Ambrose RSM serves as moderator. Stephanie Schafer ana' Nancy Meredi'th realize the effort and hard work put into a science project in order to earn a Superior Rating. Page 76 Alathematicianas, Ed Mowha ana' Esther Kosahowski discuss the problem of computing the area ofthe 3-Dpobzgon which john Pacer holds. Marihzn Bagdonas and Mi'ke Cyurko check me th eofe m for me Coffef fmeizwd ofeomputing the answer. Through Club Activities fay Kowalski fim Hermann, ana' fohn Falke focus their attention on Peggy LaPZante as they examine the photographic merits ofthe picture she holds.

Library Club members attempt to bring students to a greater realization ofthe true value offrequent reading. Clubs Emphasize Reading Lending a helping hand to allow librarians more time for their professional services, the Library Club members assist students in taking out and returning books. The climax of the year was the presentation of an assembly by members entitled: "Book- land Characters.

For the second year member students, under the leadership of Mr. Dean Richards, attempt to bring the knowledge they gain to others following the principle of" Each one teach one. Row 4, Dan Buehenmeyen and Tom Rawshi. The grid-men of Central won 7 of their 9 games. Their only city league defeat came with less than a minute to go against Macomber, as the Irish were finally worn down by a much heavier team. The high pointofthe season came on the after- noon of November 8, when Central's" Fighting Irishlthumped the Knights of St.

Francis, This win kept the "Irish Knight", a coveted and sought after trophy, in the hands of Central for another year. Other high points were frequent as the Irish gridders re- bounded from a poor preceeding season. The Celts also proved they were not lack- ing for defensive ability as evidenced by a victory over a tough Libbey Cowboy squad in which the defense sparkled.

In conclusion tothe successful campaign, 14 Fighting Irish merited All-City honors. Zolciak and McGurk also were honored at the annual foot- ball banquet. Zolciak was named most valuable player and jim McCurk was cited as the player with the most desire. Daugherty stressed the value of football as a means of acquiring team- work, sacrifice, and discipline and stated, "The greatest value of competitive activity is the learning of the value to excel.

Coachfim Cordiak and second squad watch anxiousbz from sidelines. Brown: E. Cazula' T Krzyrninskg' R. Flores: K. Millen' M. Braung Yf Bz'rz'e,' R. Nix,' Niezgoda,' D. Mowka: R. Arbing- en' M. Blankg C. Murphygf Daouslgf Palicki. Row 3: Mr. Hzghg T Leopolaff Koralewskzg' R.

Napz'erala,' D. McCormick: B. Krall' R. Lawrenceg B. Hockrnang R. Mahoney: T Gramlingg C. Drennang G. Bolling R. Tobianskzg' B. Bolback: D. Peterg' C. Frankowskzg' G. Wasielewskif Conling M Zoltanskzy M. Bolling f McKenzie' M. Boklanaf B. Wiener f Kozlowski' Yf Novak. Row 3: R Tanseyg R. Minon' D. Marlin: M Miller: L. Caroolsg B. Myers: D. Pettea' R. Langen- derfer. Row 4: Y. Horne, M Meeks: B. Smiikg D. Paul' B. DeVanna,' R.

Skeahan: W Karmol' Gagnei' B. Beeklerg' G. Row 4: fohn Newman fMGR. Mike Murrzezz clairn the twine ahcr victory Central over Si. McGurh, f. Haiey, D. Zolciak, M. Murncrz, j. Kozlowski Yi Schick, P foyce, f Sczychowshz f.

Gintcr, S. Shay, T Boardman. Coaches: Mr. Don Lewis, Mr. S J - i -W'-0 faakay. James Zak Page 96 Mr. Dever has again proven an invalu- able aid to Central Catholic's sports program. Acting in his official post as Athletic Director, Mr. Dever is the one person most responsible forthe dynamic spirit characteristic of Central's teams and student body. This first year ashead coach ofthe Fight- ing Irish grid team has been most satis- factory for Mr.

Under his guidance the team, one ofthelightest in the city, compiled a record and took second place in the City League. Cordiak is also the boys' Physiology teacher. Zak, another first-year man, has won his place on Central's athletic staff.

He is the head golf coach and he assist- ed Mr. Cordiak with the football team and Mr. Lewis with the Varsity Basket- ball team. Zak is also a Physical Education teacher. Donald Lewis is well-known around Central. He has been a coach at CCHS for five years. He made his debut as a backfield coach for the football team and has spent the past two seasons as head basketball coach.

Lewis is also one of Central's Government teachers. Donald Lewis Mr. Joseph Wesfenkirchner Now in his third year ofcoaching varsity football at Central, Mr. Westenkirchner has compiled an admirable record.

The ex-pro, a former player with the Los Angeles Rams, is head coach of the base- ball team and assistant line coach and trainer for the gridiron team. Peter Benedict Mr, Piloseno has been on Central's faculty since , coaching the wrestling team to numerous cham- pionships and piloting the success- ful bowling team. This year's wrestling team captured third place in the state tourney and the bowl- ing team took the first place tro- phy in both divisions ofthe city league.

Daniel Piloseno Mr. Gajdostik is a man of many duties. This year he coached the cross country team and took charge of the school book- store. He also keeps his regular duties as a history teacher. Benedict is now completing his second year on the Irish coaching staff.

The assist- ant football and basketball coach is a grad- uate and two-year letter man ofthe Univer- sity of Toledo, class of He teaches boys' Physical Education. Dennis Galaydu In Mr. Galayda's first year at Central he has taken charge of the track team and has high hopes for this year's cindermen. He was an assistant football coach under Mr.

Galayda is also an instructor in history. Daniel Pilosizzo. Page 98 Plzz'! MeCartney in aelion on the mats. Daniel Piloseno gives Ed R0- nzito a word of encouragement, Tom fazwieekzgrapples forposiiion. Row 5: Richard Knzghzl David! Row 2: ffm Matuzak, Pau! Row Mike Horne, Bi!! Row 4: Fm Renaraf Pki! Francis High School, March On March 10, Mr. Tim Dever, athletic director, presented letters to participants of at least six matches during league play.

The helmsman guiding the champion "wood pushers" is Fr. Jude Rochford,who has coached Central's Chess teams since Page Lej? The GAL aims to develop the qualities of sportsmanship and athletic ability in girls, just as the varsity sports do for the boys. The program includes lessons in tumbling, balance beam, table tennis, shufileboard, basketball, and soccer in the first semester. During the second semester the girls participate in modern dancing, volleyball, archery, softball and relays.

The program rests in the very capable hands of Miss Frances Kronipak and Miss Maureen Gallagher, who have initiated several new activities this year. They have also started an intramural program in basketball and tennis. The outstanding time ofthe year comes at the annual GAL banquet, when one girl is chosen to receive the ALI, - around Trophy for the most active sports participation.

Page wan, A-W. V: is'. Changes forseen and unex- pected, announced by Monsignor Harrington each morning, affect the lives ot students at Central. Bailey i A at Patrick X. Higgins, vice president' Caro! Boyce, secretary, Nancy Poole, treasurer.

Jagodzinski,James W. M45 www rf W crfU 5'E' Zg sq? R, ,,,. X f'l ' I' ' y T:TT 1 :L1 gy. Kozlowski Page ' 1 Kathleen M. Wa EaeacfwE?! J I W1-it til'-fl-. Kw , fr ' ,,3g3s:zftf,1,:,,,f- in.. G5' , ,. T 'fs waxy Ear , Chagks Early, Barbara East 6 i"'. A -" -f ,ez. W 'il. VV gf ,:,-, 5. J,fff ' 'ef f. QI'f' V' 'V T f '. S 73 fl. Thomas, Kathleen T. Hail- ing from St. Richard's scholastic achievements have been highlighted by two city-wide math awards, two national Latin awards, and the honor of being named "High School Science Student of the Year.

Agnes parish, ranks first in the senior class. After graduation from Central, Esther will enter St. She is a member of St. KRUM St. Agnes 62 rv' Stanislaus M? Pearl St. Rowland-Hall Patrol 45 Patron Drive 4. Lake St. Clement Ct. Park St. Hilda Guild 1, 4, Production Staff 3, 4.

John Berchman Society 3, Math Club 4. Hall Patrol 45 Student Court 4. Weber St. Hudson St. Central Ave. Loowus, Rum Jackman Rd. Cove Blvd. JOAN 27 W. John Berch- man Society 45 Usher 4. Byrne Rd. Weber-Patron Drive 4. IO9th St. Page mural I, 2, 3, Track 4, Patron Drive 4. Lockwood-Football I. SC I, 2, Dancing Irish 4. Gallagher Rt. John L. Harrington Rt. Ignatius T. Kelly Rt. Jerome E. Schmit Msgr.

Albert Sprenger Rev Rev. Thomas Beauregard Herbert Kraus Rev. John J. Meehan Rev. Joseph Mrowca Rev. John P. Pasqualin Rev. Robert Reinhart Rev. Joseph D. Shenk Rev. Ernest Waechter, O. Arnerr Donald L. David W. Barry, Jr. Jack Becker, D. Robert Beckham Mr. Martin Bennett Mr. Berning Walter Bick J.

Biggs Mrs. Vera Biggs Mr. Harry Biniak Mr. Bissonnette Mr. Thomas K. Blachowski Mr. Lou Block Mr. Donald Boes Mr. Alvin Bogdanski Mrs. Alene Boldt Mr. Joseph Bonk Mrs. Bernadette Boratyn Barbara Borawski Mr. Frank Borawski Mr. Thomas Borer Mr. Anthony A. Bosch, Sr. Leonard Bromer "Bubbles" Mr. Don Buck William E. Buehler, Class of '64 Mrs.

Carr Mr. Fredrick Cerrone Mr. Chmielewski Mr. Robert MacFadden Mr. Cichy Mr. Crane Mr. Charles Cray Mr. Robert Cryan Mrs. Anthony Colisino Anne T. Collins Dr. James I. Collins Mr. Harold Corcoran Mr. Loyd Cousino Mr. Cuzynski Mr. Edmund Czarnecki Mr. Stan Czyzewski D. Kathy Dauer Mrs. Leona Davidson Josephine Dazewiecki Mr. Marshall R. Desmond Mr. Dillon Mr. Peter DiPaola Mr. Leo C. Dressel Mr. Richard C. Duffey R. Hemming Dullum Mr.

William Dunn Mr. Albert F. Earl Mr. Carl Eckhardt Mr. Eckstein Mr. Eggleston Mr. John Ehret Mr. John Eisenreich Mr. Felix Ellerbrock Mrs. William Emery Gabriel N. Esper and Family Mrs. Lorraine Essi P. Extejt Rose E. F alke Mr. Donald Fall Fang Mr. Max Ferrenberg Sue A. Ferrenberg Mr. Cecil Finley Mr. Larry Fischer Mr. Kenneth Fisher Mr. John C. Howard Flahiff Mr. Edward Forgette Sr.

Frank Mr. Galayda Mr. Vincent Girardi Mr. Grime L. Gladieux Mr. Leo Gladieux and Dan Mr. Stanley Glinka Henry Goodman Dr. Terrence P. Gorman Mr. Carl Graber Mr. Graber Mr. Sylvester Grandowicz Mr. Frank Grayczyk, Jr. Virgil Grosjean Mr. John E.

Gurecky Mr. Frank Habrych and Nancy Mr. Richard Harley Phil R. Harrison Mr. Lee Hawkins Mr. Raymond L. Hawkins Mr. Howard G. Hayes Mr. John Healy Mr. Gene Hegedus James O. Helland '49 Mr. Helmer Marci Helmier '64 Mr. Ray M. Hickok Gale Higgins R. Higgins Norman Hiraoka A. Holewinski Mr. Anthony Holewinski Robert H. Hoover Mr. Joseph Horvath Mr. Howard Robert Hoyt J. Huss Raymond A. Ichrist Mr. Herman Jacob Mrs. Sarah L. Jacobi Mr. Edmund Kielczewski Mr. Killinger Cliff Kime Sr.

Casimer Kleparek Rich Kleparek '65 Mr. Henry A. Klein Mr. Anna Kolebuck Mr. Harold Kozlowski Mr. Paul Krasula Mr. Stanley Kolebuck Al Konecki E. Kotlewski R. Kozak W. Krum Daniel Kubacki Mr. Stan Kujawa Mr. Walter Kujawa Mr. Stanley M. Kurek Mr. James LaBay R. Langenderfer Walter Lardinais Vincent C. Lauer Mr. Alfred Lewandowski Mr. Lewandowski Leonaro L. Lewandowski George-Lindley Mr. Lockwood Dr. Logue Linda and Lorraine Mr. Majewski E. Malin Raymond S.

Malinowski Dr. Thomas L. Maloney Thomas W. Mahoney Jr Mr. Clifford A. Johnson A. Joniec Mr. Kahle Mr. Oscar Marquis Mrs. Florence Marsh Mary and Dave Mr. Tom McCarthy Mr. Larry McCartney Wm. McCartney Family Mr. Stanley Kondalski Mr. Richard S. Karazim Mrs. Helen Karnikowski Mr. Karnikowski Mr. Mitchell Kawczynski Mr. William Kelly Harold R. Kennedy Mr. Frank Kern Sr. McVicker J. Meehan Mr. Mercker Mr. Edward F. Mohr Mr.

Monks Paul Mouch '56 Grafton L. Mouen Nancy, Kathy, janet Mr. Fred J. Neuhausel Don Nieckarz Mr and Mrs. Edward Niescuir Mr and Mrs. Niewiadomski Mr. Nortz Mr and Mrs. Chester Nowak Mr and Mrs. Nowak Mr and Mrs. John W. Nowak Lottie F. Nowak Don O'Brien '49 Mrs. O'Loughlin Mr. Paul O'Rourke Mr. Eugene Oleksiak Mrs. Sophie Olewinski Dr. Oswald Tony Packo Mr. Henry Palka Mr. Henry Patro Mr.

Pawlecki Mr. Arthur B. Pawlicki Gene and Alma Periat Mr. Harry Pfeiifer Mr. Pietrzak Travis Earl Poore Mr. Frank Poplar and Ken Mr. Lawrence Poulin Mr. Leo Powers Mr. Robert Printy Mr. Casimer Raczkowski Mrs. Radlinski Mr. Randolph Mr. Rantanen and Mrs.

Rejent and Mrs. John Renauer Pat Revard '65 Mr. Phillip Revard Mr. Dean Richards Bob Roach Mr. John A. Robb Mr. Roesner Terry and Tom Roesner Mr. Rogalski Frank Rogalski jr. Roger and Sharon Lewis Rogers Mrs. Marcella Rogers Mr. Romatowski Mr. Lloyd Rouse Mr. Kenneth Rowe Mr. Michael's Boy Scout Troop St.

Vincent Hospital School of Nursing Mr. John Saionzkowski Mr. Edward C. Schaefer Mr. Thomas Schaub Mr. Robert E. Schmitt Mr. Stanley Schoviak Edward 1. Schroeder jr. Albert Schupp Mr. Hector C. Seguin Mr. Stanley Sexton Seymour-Pieron Mr. Robert Seymour Sr. Shoemaker, O.

Theodore Shofer Mr. Paul Shonebarger and Family Mr. Shriner Marty Shriner Mr. Simms Dr. Singer M. Kasher M. Ned Skeldon Mr. Skowron Mr. William D. Smith Otto G. Smoktonowicz '57 Mr. Walter Smolenski Mrs. Clara A. Smolinski Mr. James Sneider Mr. Frank Sobczak Mr. Edward Sochocki Mr. Spitulski Mr. Sprinski Gilbert G. Sprunk Mr. Leonard Staszak Mr. Struckholz Mr. Sulier Mr. Sutter Mr. Szelagowski Mr. Galvin; Farmer and Dairyman Publishing House; Transcribed by GT Team] Blakeley, George Clarence George Clarence Blakeley, a pharmacist of state-wide repute, enjoys the distinction of being the oldest established druggist in The Dalles, which for more than forty years has numbered him among its useful and influential citizens.

His talents have been exerted as readily for the public welfare as for his own aggrandizement and his record reflects credit upon an honored family name. A native of Oregon, he was born in Brownsville, Linn County, August 29, , and represents one of the oldest and most prominent families of the state. His great-grandfather, Charles Blakeley, was a native of Ireland and when a small boy came to the new world with his parents, who were among the colonial settlers of Virginia.

As a soldier in the Revolutionary war Charles Blakeley aided in winning American independence and afterward went to Tennessee. The remainder of his life was spent in that state and when eighty years of age he was called to his final rest. He was the father of Joseph Blakeley, who was also a patriotic citizen and fought in the War of In he migrated to Platte county, Missouri, where he engaged in farming and stock raising until his demise, and for twenty-six years served as a circuit judge.

His son, James Blakeley, father of George Clarence Blakeley, was born November 26, , in Knox county, Tennessee and received his education in the district schools of that state. He remained at home until he was twenty-two years of age and in married Miss Sarah Dick, who was born November 24, , in Knox county, Tennessee.

Blakeley followed agricultural pursuits in his native state until , when he went to Missouri and filed on a homestead. He cleared and developed the tract, on which he resided until , when he disposed of the property and started for Oregon, joining a large wagon train, of which he was chosen captain. In the fall of he arrived in Linn county and entered a donation claim of six hundred and forty acres, settling where the town of Brownsville is now located.

Here he built a small log house and zealously applied himself to the arduous task of clearing the land and preparing it for the growing of crops. In order to obtain a plow he had to go to Oregon City, a distance of seventy-five miles, and made the trip with a team of oxen. There were no bridges or roads and two weeks were required to complete the journey.

In he produced his first crop of grain and this was probably the first yield in Linn county. A successful stockman, he raised many head of cattle, horses and hogs and took large herds of cattle to the ranges in eastern Oregon. He fattened cattle for the market and drove them to California, disposing of them to the miners. Blakeley built the first flour mill in Oregon and in erected the first store in Brownsville.

His trade was largely with the Indians, as there were few white settlers in the locality at that time. For several years he successfully conducted the store and then sold the business to George C. Cooley, his son-in-law. After retiring from the field of merchandising Captain Blakeley resumed the occupations of farming and stock raising; which he followed during the remainder of his active career.

He represented Linn county in the state legislature and filled other public offices of importance, faithfully discharging every trust reposed in him. Captain Blakeley long survived his wife, who died June 14, On November 26, , he celebrated the one hundredth anniversary of his birth and in commemoration of the event a medal was made, which is now in the custody of the State Historical Society. During the latter part of his life Captain Blakeley resided in the home of his son Henry in Brownsville and there passed away January 19, He was a man of exceptional worth and his death was mourned throughout the state.

To Captain Blakeley and his wife were born eleven children: Mrs. Ellen Montgomery and Mrs. George C. Cooley, who has passed away; Mrs. Sarah McFarlane, of Brownsville. In a splendid granite shaft fourteen feet tall was erected by Captain Blakeley's surviving children to the memory of their father at Main and Blakeley avenues, the original site of his claim.

When the shaft was dedicated "Peggy" Chessman, the thirteen-year-old daughter of Mr. Merle Chess-man of Astoria, delivered the following address of presentation: "Mr. Mayor and friends: I have come here as the great-great-granddaughter of Captain and Mrs.

James Blakeley, in whose memory this monument has been erected. It was placed here by their children to stand as a lasting tribute of love and honor to their parents, who settled on this spot when Oregon was almost a virgin wilderness and who made it their home for more than half a century. In a broader sense, it is dedicated to all those early-day pioneers, of whom Captain and Mrs.

Blakeley were typical; those pathfinders who blazed the trail to Oregon, enduring the hazards and hardships of frontier life while they builded the foundations of the state, and the fruits of whose labors we of later generations enjoy. Mayor, as a representative of the city of Brownsville, a deed to the monument and the plot of ground upon which it stands, that the people of this historic town may have and hold it as theirs forever.

It represents an expression of one of the fundamental principles of American citizenship. The great nations of the past have risen in prominence and influence, flourished for a period and passed into a decline. The beginning of this decline may invariably be traced to the loss of the patriotic spirit that predominated during the period of the nation's ascendancy.

Just as long as expressions of this nature are in evidence we may rest assured that the spark of patriotism that in times of national peril has been the impelling force to call to the defense of the native land the flower of our sturdy manhood, needs but the call of necessity to fan to the flame that has assembled the mighty armies that have decisively repelled the invader, overwhelmingly put down internal opposition and emerged in triumph from an effort to end a struggle in which civilization itself was threatened.

During the course of years it had grown and developed, attaining the fullness of its sturdiness and splendor. In the strength of its fiber it withstood the storms of the succeeding seasons. In its allotted time strength declined; this, the peer of the forest, bowed before the grim reaper, and the spot upon which it had stood gave no evidence of a former greatness.

During the period of its strength and vigor, in accordance with nature's plan, acorns had fallen from its branches, and in passing, the sturdy oak left behind a young and vigorous forest that gave mute testimony that a predecessor had fulfilled its destiny.

The power of this republic does not lie in the accomplishment of a few supermen, but rather in the steadfastness, loyalty and patriotism of the men and women who take up the every-day tasks of existence. Blakeley obtained his rudimentary instruction and was next a pupil in the public schools of Brownsville. He attended Albany College for a year and for three years was a student at the Oregon Agricultural College in Corvallis. Entering the educational field, he became a teacher in the public schools of Brownsville and was made principal, filling the position for three years.

For six years he represented the firm in that capacity and then went to Canada, spending a year in Victoria, British Columbia. In he returned to Oregon, locating at The Dalles, and in May of that year entered the employ of R. Hood, a local druggist. In January, , Mr. Blakeley purchased the business, of which he has since been the owner. He carries a full line of drugs and medical supplies and the filling of prescriptions is one of the chief features of his establishment, which is not a cafeteria and soda fountain pharmacy.

It is known as the Rexall Drug Store, whose trade exceeds the boundaries of the city, extending into the surrounding country. Enterprising, efficient and thoroughly reliable, Mr. Blakeley has won and retained a position of leadership in local drug circles and is also an astute financier. In he aided in organizing the Wasco County Bank and was elected president of the institution, which is capitalized at one hundred thousand dollars and occupies an imposing building on East Second street.

Blakeley is likewise a successful fruit grower and has a valuable cherry orchard of thirty acres. The ranch is located near The Dalles and irrigated with water from the city. Blakeley was married January 29, , to Miss Mary T.

The family went to San Francisco, California, by the water route, making the voyage around Cape Horn, and in came to Oregon. For an extended period Mr. Gorman was engaged in the transfer business in Portland and his demise occurred in the Rose City in , when he had reached the advanced age of ninety-seven years.

Of the children born to Mr. Gorman, two are now living: Mrs. Blakeley, and Mrs. Margaret Ordahl, a resident of Portland. As one of the councilmen of The Dalles, Mr. Blakeley was instrumental in securing for the municipality needed reforms and improvements and is always ready to serve his community to the extent of his ability.

When he became county judge of Wasco and Hood River counties the public funds were depleted and there was an indebtedness of two hundred thousand dollars. For eight years he was the incumbent of the office and during that period removed this burden of debt from the counties without increasing the taxation. During the World war he was chairman for four years of the committee in charge of the Red Cross activities in Wasco, Sherman, Wheeler and Gilliam counties and succeeded in raising a large amount of money for the organization.

Blakeley joined the Masonic order, with which his father was also affiliated, and has attained the thirty-second degree in the Scottish Rite Consistory. He is a past master of the blue lodge, past high priest of the chapter and past eminent commander of the commandery. For a year Mr. Blakeley was the executive head of the Rexall Club, an international association, which draws its members from the United States, Canada and Great Britain.

He was the first president of the club elected west of the Rockies and on his retirement from the office in was presented with a handsome watch, suitably inscribed, as a testimonial of appreciation of his services.

Blakeley was the second president of the Oregon Pharmaceutical Association and served for fifteen years on the state board of pharmacy. In addition to his attractive residence in The Dalles, he has a fine home at Seaside, where he spends a portion of each summer, and is one of the disciples of Izaak Walton. He is also a devotee of golf and an expert player. Worthy motives and high principles have actuated Mr. Blakeley at all points in his career and throughout eastern Oregon he is admired and respected.

Blakeney, who was among the first settlers of Wasco county, performed his full part in the drama of early civilization here, and to a marked degree commanded the confidence and respect of his fellowmen. He was there reared and educated and in the early '40s went to Illinois, where he engaged in farming. In he sold out there and, with a good outfit, including ox teams and covered wagons, started on the long journey across the plains to Oregon.

The party was well provisioned at the start, but, owing to their generosity in sharing their food with other less fortunate than themselves, ran short and Mr. Blakeney paid as much as a dollar each for biscuits for himself and family. They arrived in Oregon in the late fall of , and proceeded on to Cowlitz county, Washington, where he took up a homestead.

They lived there until , when he sold out and came to The Dalles, Oregon, bringing the furniture and household goods, as well as twenty-five head of cattle, on a scow from the Cowlitz river to the lower Cascades. They transported their stuff above the Cascades and there took a steamer to The Dalles. For several years Mr. Blakeney ran a pack train from The Dalles to the mines in eastern Oregon, in which he met with success, and later established a livery stable and draying business in The Dalles, which he conducted to the time of his death, February 20, His wife died in In December, , in Illinois, Mr.

Blakeney was married to Miss Nancy Phelps, who was born in Danville, Vermillion county, Illinois, September 8, , and they became the parents of six children, namely: Hugh T. Blakeney was a man of sterling character, energetic methods and sound judgment and during his active career took a deep interest in the progress and development of his city and community.

Emma J. Blakeney was educated in the public schools at The Dalles and remained at home until her marriage, June 21, , to William T. McClure, who was born in Missouri, April 18, He came to Wasco county with his family in an early day and as soon as old enough took up a preemption claim of one hundred and sixty acres, about four and a half miles east of Mosier.

His father and brother also took claims in the same district and were the second family to settle in that locality. McClure's land was partly covered with oak grubs, which he cleared off and, after building a good house, he engaged in farming, raising grain, hay, cattle and horses. He was successful in his operations and later bought sixty additional acres, a part of the Nathan Morris donation claim.

This was good bottom land and on it he raised bountiful crops of alfalfa and potatoes, as well as asparagus. He was energetic and progressive in his methods and devoted himself closely to the operation of the farm to the time of his death, on March 13, To Mr.

McClure were born six children: Mrs. Josephine Evans, who lives in Portland, Oregon, and is the mother of four children, Mrs. Mabel Miller, Mrs. Blanche Durham, Robert M. Jessie A. Pearl Ellis, of Portland. McClure was a Mason and was a man of fine public spirit, taking an active interest in everything affecting the welfare of his community.

He was particularly interested in educational matters and served for many years either as clerk or a member of the school board. William T. McClure, Jr. He raises good crops of hay and grain and potatoes, has three acres in asparagus, and also has a nice herd of dairy cows, a number of hogs and a large number of chickens. The McClure homestead, which is located midway between Hood River and The Dalles, on the famous Columbia River highway, is finely situated, commanding a magnificent view of the majestic river, and is regarded as one of the best farms in this section of the valley.

McClure and his mother are kindly and hospitable, give their earnest support to all local interests of value to the locality, and throughout the community are held in the highest esteem. Clarke Publishing Company - ] Bolton, Grifford Virgil An interesting story of earnest endeavor, intelligently directed, constitutes the life record of Grifford Virgil Bolton, who was for many years actively and prominently associated with banking interests of The Dalles.

Moreover, he was a native son of Oregon and throughout his life was a supporter of all the well devised plans and measures for the upbuilding of his city and state. Both were natives of Virginia and representatives of old families of that state. At an early day they journeyed westward to become residents of Oregon and took up their abode on a farm in the vicinity of The Dalles on Fifteen Mile creek, where occurred the birth of their son Virgil.

He first served in a clerical capacity but bent every energy toward acquainting himself with the banking business in principle and detail and his thoroughness, his industry and loyalty won him promotions from time to time until he soon became cashier and one of the chief executive officers of the institution. He continued to hold that position until his death, which occurred on the 7th of March, , when he was but thirty-two years of age.

Although he passed away at a comparatively early age he had accomplished much more than many a man of twice his years. He had made for himself a most creditable position in financial circles, enjoying an unassailable reputation for business integrity as well as enterprise. On the 28th of March, , Mr. Bolton was united in marriage to Miss Nellie J. French and they became the parents of two daughters: Carmel French, who is now the wife of Frank A.

Ryder of Portland: and Nonearle French, who is at home with her mother. Bolton was always keenly interested in public affairs at The Dalles and recognition of his public spirit and his devotion to the general good was manifest in his election to the mayoralty.

He belonged to the Masonic fraternity of which he was an exemplary representative and his entire life was characterized by those qualities which in every land and clime awaken confidence and respect.

His widow is now living at Alexandra Court, in Portland and is well known in the best circles of the Rose City. Married June 25, , to Agnes L. Educated at the common schools of Lafayette, Ore. Louis, Mo. Admitted to the Supreme Court of Oregon in Practiced law in Yamhill County until , when he removed to The Dalles and practiced his profession until May , when he was appointed Judge of Seventh Judicial District of Oregon, and has served ever since.

Member K. Thirty-six years of his life have been spent in Wasco county, which numbers him among its foremost agriculturists, and his activities have also been of benefit to The Dalles. There were seven children in the family, and Thomas Brogan is the only one now living. He was reared on his father's farm and received a limited education. Leaving home when a boy of twelve, he came to the United States alone in and obtained work in the coal mines of Pennsylvania.

In he went to Liverpool, England, and for six months was on a sailing vessel bound for Australia. He landed in Melbourne, but soon after made the voyage to New Zealand, and was there engaged in mining for five years, developing a claim which yielded considerable gold. Brogan then returned to Australia and devoted his attention to the sheep and cattle business.

He also took contracts for the construction of buildings and roads and prospered in all of his ventures. In he disposed of his business in Australia and returned to the United States, identifying his interests with those of the Pacific northwest. He purchased a large ranch in Wasco county and devoted his energies to the cultivation of the soil and the raising of livestock.

Success attended his well directed labors and from time to time he increased his holdings, which now comprise sixteen thousand acres of land in Wasco county. He is the largest individual landowner in the county, and runs about four thousand head of sheep and a large band of cattle, but the management of the place is now intrusted to his son, John Brogan. The father's various ranches are improved with good buildings and contain sixty-seven miles of fencing.

The work is facilitated by modern equipment and the most advanced methods are utilized in cultivating the land and caring for the stock. Brogan puts up six hundred tons of hay and alfalfa each year, and all of the grain and hay grown on the land is fed to the stock.

In he moved to The Dalles, purchasing a desirable home on Webster street, and also owns several lots in the city. He is the largest stockholder of the Citizens National Bank of The Dalles, of which he was one of the organizers, but has steadfastly refused to become an officer of the institution, feeling that the preference should be given to a younger man.

Collopy, who was born in that country. Her parents, William and Elizabeth O'Brien Collopy, were natives of Ireland and became pioneer settlers of New Zealand, in which they spent the remainder of their lives. The father followed agricultural pursuits and was a prosperous stock raiser. Collopy were born twelve children and three are now living: Bridget M.

Brogan became the parents of twelve children, six of whom survive. Mary was born in New Zealand and has remained at home. Bridget, also a native of New Zealand, became the wife of J. Robinson and has a daughter, Lillian, who is now Mrs. Ned Wyke of Portland, Oregon. John was born in New Zealand, and resides in Antelope, Oregon. Susan is likewise a native of New Zealand, and has become the wife of Frank Weiss.

Katherine was born in Wasco county, and is part owner of a greenhouse at The Dalles. Frances Grace, also a native of Wasco county, is now Mrs. John Becker. She resides in Woodburn and is the mother of one child, Thomas Joseph Becker. For more than a half century Mr. Brogan have journeyed together through life and in they celebrated their golden wedding anniversary. On that happy occasion a banquet was held at Hotel Dalles and there Mr.

Brogan entertained about forty friends, from whom they received many beautiful gifts as well as congratulations. Among the treasured possessions of Mr. Brogan is a rare onyx clock, tendered him by the premier of New Zealand and several of his most intimate friends at the time of his departure for the United States.

Brogan exercises his right of franchise in support of the candidates and tenets of the republican party, and his public spirit has been demonstrated by effective work in behalf of good roads and schools. His has been a picturesque career, replete with interesting experiences. He enjoys life and is esteemed for the qualities to which he owes his success. In May, , Mr. Brogan with Katherine and Frances, took a trip to Ireland, revisiting the old home.

Clarke Publishing Company - ] Browne, Dr. He is now a successful chiropractor of The Dalles, where he is accorded a liberal patronage. His parents were Christopher C. The Brownes were of old Pennsylvania stock and the great-grandfather of the Doctor became a pioneer of Missouri.

The Mason family came from New England ancestry and were pioneers of Indiana. Christopher C. Browne removed with his family to Oregon when his son Daniel was but a small boy and settled in Salem. The latter acquired his preliminary education in the public schools of Salem and afterward pursued an academic course at Dallas, while his professional training was received in the Pacific Chiropractic College at Portland.

Following his graduation he took up active professional work in that city and there remained from until During his stay in Portland he was for three years secretary of the Oregon Chiropractic Association and published a magazine called The Drugless Review, devoted to the school of healing which he represents. He was one of a committee appointed to draft a bill legalizing the practice of chiropractic, which was passed by the legislature in His work in that connection required so much of his time that he was forced to permit The Drugless Review to die just as it was getting on a paying basis.

This unselfishness on his part is but an index of the character of the man. In Dr. Ingram, who had built up an extensive business in The Dalles, invited Dr. Browne was united in marriage to Miss Almona R. Daniels, a daughter of Francis M. Daniels, who was a merchant. They have one child, Elizabeth, a student in the Junior high school in The Dalles. Fraternally Dr. Browne is connected with the Elks and with the Knights of Pythias. He holds to the higest standards in his profession and his ability and enterprise have brought him prominently to the front.

Robert R. Butler, a member of one of the leading law firms of The Dalles, has become well known through his service as circuit judge, as state senator, and as one of the political leaders of Oregon. He was born September 24, , in Johnson county, Tennessee, and is a son of Dr. William H. One of Mr. Butler's ancestors figured prominently in events which shaped the early history of Johnson county and the town of Butler was named in his honor.

Colonel Roderick Randon Butler, the father of Dr. William R. Grayson, the maternal grandfather of Robert H. Butler, was also a gallant officer in the Union army and rose to the rank of colonel. Butler received the M. He is a physician of high standing and draws his patients from a wide area. To Dr. Butler were born ten children: Mrs. Baker, who lives in the state of Washington; Robert R. Sproles, who resides in North Carolina; C. James Rivers, of North Carolina.

Butler was reared in the town of Butler, which has been the home of the family for generations, and supplemented his public school training by attendance at the Holly Spring College. He received the degree of LL. For three years he followed his profession at Mountain City, Tennessee, and in came to Oregon, locating in Condon, Gilliam county, where he practiced for five years.

His legal acumen led to his election to the bench and during and he was circuit judge of Sherman, Wheeler and Gilliam counties. To each case brought before his tribunal he gave deep thought and study and the justice of his rulings proved his moral worth. As mayor of Condon he also made an excellent record and since has been a resident of The Dalles. He has a comprehensive knowledge of law and displays marked skill in its exposition.

In he formed a partnership with Samuel E. Van Vactor, who is the senior member of the firm, and a large and important clientele denotes the confidence reposed in their ability as advocates and counselors. Butler was married in and has a daughter, Elizabeth Annabel.

She was born at The Dalles, June 30, , and is attending St. Helen's Hall in Portland, Oregon. A power in the ranks of the republican party, Mr. Butler was chosen presidential elector-at-large and in was made messenger to Washington, D.

In he was elected state senator without opposition and from until was a member of that law-making body. In he again became presidential elector for Oregon and in was recalled to the office of state senator. He served from until and exerted his influence in behalf of all constructive legislation. Butler is a Kiwanian and a past chancellor of the Knights of Pythias. His well developed powers have brought him to the front in his profession and the firmness, frankness and strength of his character have established him high in public regard.

His paternal grandfather was a native of Virginia and the family were among the early pioneers of Illinois. The Coy family was of Quaker stock and numbered among the earliest residents of Pennsylvania. In Polk Butler removed with his family to Oregon, settling at Dufur, Wasco county, at which time Roy was a lad of but four years. He acquired his education in the graded schools of Dufur and in the high school at The Dalles. When quite young he entered into the mercantile business as a clerk in a general store at Boyd, Wasco county, and afterward turned his attention to ranching on Eight Mile creek, where he secured four hundred and forty acres, on which he planted an orchard and also engaged in raising cattle for the next ten years.

He likewise became interested in the mercantile business at Boyd during the same period. Butler was elected to the office of county commissioner and occupied that position for four years. In the meantime he took up his residence at The Dalles and upon the expiration of his term as commissioner he established the insurance agency which he still conducts. He is the representative of the Oregon Fire Relief Association for the district which embraces the counties of Morrow, Gilliam, Wasco, Hood River and Sherman and has placed his company upon a sound basis in this territory, having developed a business of gratifying and substantial proportions.

Butler was married to Miss Ethel Southern, a daughter of C. Southern, a pioneer farmer of Wasco county. They have two children: Melva May and Roy Dale, both high school pupils. Butler has a sister, Mrs. Edward Griffin, of Wasco county, and two brothers: the Rev. Butler, a missionary in South Africa and E. Butler, living at The Dalles. Butler gives his political allegiance to the democratic party, yet he cannot be said to be a politician in the sense of office seeking.

The only public office he has filled besides that of county commissioner was that of postmaster at Boyd. He is an active member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and has filled all of the chairs in the local organization.

The Butler family has long been represented in Oregon, for Roy D. Butler is a nephew of Daniel Butler, who came to this state in the '40s and is frequently mentioned in history as one of the founders of the state and as a fearless Indian fighter.

Under other conditions Roy D. Butler is just as loyal to the best interests of Oregon and is justly accounted one of the representative citizens of The Dalles. Collector of Internal Revenue for the District and State of Oregon, is one of those quiet, unassuming gentlemen, whom we sometimes meet in the walks of public life, and realize the fact that in his case at least the office has sought the man, not the man the office, as is too generally the case.

He is a native of Michigan and was born in He came to Oregon in and read law with Hon. Wilson, afterwards Representative in Congress from this State. He was admitted to the bar in and opened an office at Salem. He was a member of the House from Marion County in , and in was elected State Senator from the same county. In he received the appointment of United States District Attorney.

At the expiration of his term of service in this capacity in , owing to failing health, he removed to Eastern Washington Territory, and there engaged in the stock business until , when he moved to The Dalles, and, in partnership with Hon. Dunbar, resumed the practice of law. In he was elected Presidential Elector on the Republican ticket and was a participant in the memorable Electoral College of that year, when poor Cronin - peace to his ashes - was so prominent a factor, and when Oregon's vote elected President Hayes.

In May, , he received his present appointment. Cartwright is a gentleman who is highly esteemed by all who know him and is regarded as a man of sterling integrity. He is tall and spare built, smooth face, save the mustache, sharp features, clear peaceful eye, and black hair.

He is a warm personal friend and one that never forgets a favor. He is courteous, genial and generous. As a public officer, he is attentive and obliging and in every way efficient. Helm, of the M. Team] Cates, Daniel L. Conscientious and efficient, Daniel L. Cates has thoroughly demonstrated his worth as a public servant and for eleven years has been city recorder of The Dalles. He is a loyal Oregonian and a member of one of the honored, pioneer families of the state.

The following account of his career was written by Fred Lockley and published in the Oregon Journal under date of November 29, 'I was born in a log cabin on the Long Tom, near Starr's Point, in Benton county, May 7, ,' said Mr.

His father's name was Alexander Cates. His mother's maiden name was Nancy Phipps and she was also a Kentuckian. My father left the Blue Grass state in , when he was nineteen years of age, and went to Missouri with an uncle, John Newton. She was a daughter of Daniel Grice, who went from that state to Kentucky and later located in Linn county, Missouri. Father and his brother-in-law, Daniel Grice, built houses.

In those days all lumber, including the flooring, was dressed by hand. Father had taken up a place in Linn county and in addition to working at his trade, raised corn and tobacco. Flournoy and his relatives. They took the usual emigrant route during the first part of the trip and went by way of the cut-off to Fort Hall.

The Nemaha river was crossed on rafts built by members of the party and at Salt creek they were detained for two days. There were few accidents on the trip, though in the early part of it an exciting incident occurred in the Pawnee country.

One morning a man came riding toward them at top speed on a fine grey horse and warned them of Indians who had attacked a train in advance of them. Three parties of emigrants had left Missouri at about the same time, the Flournoy train, the one attacked by Indians and what was called the Ohio train. The last consisted of forty men without a woman or child among them.

There were two Indians in sight in an elevated position, signaling to the band that led in the attack and informing them of the movements of the whites. The Ohio train rushed in from the rear on horseback and soon reached the Indians. The wagons of the Flournoy train were placed in a double row and the party advanced as rapidly as possible.

After robbing the women of their jewelry and taking as much food and clothing as they could lay hands on, the Indians escaped and no one was injured. The Flournoy train followed the route to the crossing of the Portneuf, which runs into the Snake river, and then traveled to the south, crossing the Raft river. As they followed its course they came to that remarkable creation of nature, the Thousand Spring valley, containing those famous soda springs which vary in temperature from boiling hot to ice cold and which cover an area of several square miles.

Proceeding through what was afterwards called the Landers cut-off, they came out on the Green river and followed its course to St. Mary's river. After passing the three Humboldt lakes they 1 were warned by a note tacked up by the roadside of danger from Indians. Two men had been killed and a little farther on the body of an Indian was found lying in the road. At the foot of the last lake two roads separate, one leading to the Carson river and the other to the Truckee river.

The party followed the Truckee road and about September 17, , camped where the Donner party endured their sufferings and where some met their tragic deaths in They could see plainly where the trees had been cut down and limbs cut off of others ten or twelve feet above the ground, showing how deep the snow must have been when they camped on it. Later he took up a claim on Poor Man creek, finding dirt which paid him thirty dollars a day with pick and pan.

After working the claim for a month the heavy snow drove him out and he went back to Nevada City, where he spent the winter. Next spring he found a claim from which. In company with three other miners he engaged in prospecting on Kanaha creek. They struck a claim where they took out fifty dollars a day.

As soon as their grub was gone they went back to Nevada City and brought out twelve hundred pounds of supplies on seven pack horses. They found their claim had been jumped, so they struck out down the creek and struck another claim even richer than the first. On July 4, , the four of them took out over six hundred dollars. They averaged about one hundred dollars a day. My father's partners became dissatisfied and thought they could find a richer ground, so he bought them out and worked the claim until late in the fall of Downieville, the nearest post office, was twelve miles distant by mountain trail.

He worked on a hotel and was paid ten dollars a day. After the hotel was built he went to Sacramento and from there to San Francisco, where he bought a ticket for Panama. He had to pay sixteen dollars for the use of a mule to ride twenty-six miles across the isthmus to connect with a boat. After he had ridden about two-thirds of the way he overtook a miner, who offered him eight dollars for the use of the mule for the remaining eight miles, so father walked the rest of the way.

He had to pay a fare of ten dollars on a rowboat which took him to the Atlantic side of the isthmus. The natives were having a revolution and told the Californians to keep off the streets so they wouldn't get hurt. However, the Americans wanted to see what was going on, so one of them was killed, as well as a number of natives.

The American consul sent out to the Cherokee and Ohio, which were anchored in the stream, and got a brass six-pounder and an iron cannon. He put these so he could sweep the street and told the natives that if they fought any more or killed any more Americans he would turn the cannon loose, so they decided to quit fighting.

He bought a steerage ticket for New York for fifty dollars. The first cabin ticket was seventy-five dollars. After he got on the boat he paid the purser five dollars extra to sit at the first cabin table and have a cabin like the first class passengers. The Ohio was a sidewheeler and there were about two hundred returning gold miners aboard. At Havana they transferred to the Georgia for New Orleans.

In the Crescent city he paid sixteen dollars for a ticket to St. Louis and made the trip of about twelve-hundred miles on the Patrick Henry. At St. Louis he took passage on a small boat called the Lewis F. Linn, for Brunswick, the great tobacco trading point on the Missouri, traveling with Washington Leach, who had been his companion in the mines of California and on the returning sea voyage.

At Brunswick he hired a rig to drive to Linneus, where he had left mother. When he arrived there he found that his father-in-law had sold out and that mother had gone to Jive with Uncle Newton. He hired a man to drive him out to the Newton place. He bought a house and lot for three hundred dollars and got a job as carpenter at a dollar and a quarter a day.

In the party were father's cousin, Ambrose Newton, who brought his wife and three children. He had two wagons, with four yoke of oxen to each, and was accompanied by three young men, who came along to work for their board.

Father had one wagon, three yoke of oxen and two cows. In his wagon were himself, mother, Sarah, the baby, and a young man named Washington Ward, who went along to work for his hoard. The members of the train chose father as their captain because of his previous experience in crossing the plains. The emigrants drove to St. Joseph, Missouri, and thence up the river, which they crossed at Council Bluffs.

They took the south side of the Platte. A large party of Pawnee Indians accompanied them almost to Ash Hollow. There my father and Mr. Wiley went on a hunting expedition. Father killed a big buffalo and they loaded their horses with meat. When they were hunting a hail storm came up which was so severe that the cattle couldn't face it. They turned around and drifted with the storm.

On the Bear river in Utah six saddle horses were stolen. Father lost a good horse. He said that when he and Fowler were looking for the horses they met an Indian on a cayuse,while his squaw was mounted on a big roan horse. Father had a rifle with inlaid silver work and the Indian tried to take it.

Father pulled out his Colt revolver and the Indian changed his mind, and the last father saw of him and the squaw they were making their horses go as fast as they could. The next day the party arrived at Steamboat Springs, where an Englishman had a trading station. After crossing the Malheur river they went down the Snake and struck Burnt river at a point where Huntington was afterward built. They passed through the Powder River valley below the place where Baker City is now located and there father suffered from blood poisoning, which endangered his life.

After coming into the Grande Ronde valley they passed Medical lake and in the Blue mountains stayed over night at Lee's encampment, now Bingham Springs. Then they proceeded down the Wild Horse through what is now the Umatilla Indian reservation, finding Indians there who were raising corn and potatoes. After reaching Deschutes they made their way down Ten-Mile creek and thence to Tygh valley. They passed through the Barlow tollgate and down Laurel Hill, soon afterward coming to the Big Sandy valley.

On September 9 they reached Foster's famous ranch and on the 11th crossed the Willamette at Portland on a capstan and two horses. In father and Fred Flora took a contract to get out timbers and build a barn for Captain Doty in Yamhill county. Father next built a granary for Mr. McLeod on Tualatin plains. They paid him seven dollars a day and he took his pay in flour, which he sold in Portland. From Tualatin plains he moved to the Long Tom, in Beaten county, where he bought, for three hundred dollars, a quarter section.

Forty acres of the tract had been fenced and there was a good house on the place. Father bought a land entry of one hundred and sixty acres for one hundred and twenty dollars and took up the adjoining quarter section. The first loom on the Long Tom was constructed by father, who built it for Mrs. He was paid forty dollars for the job. Ferguson wove homespun cloth. He bought a new wagon, a span of mules and ninety head of cattle.

He hired John Florence to drive the stock over the Barlow trail to the Dennis Maloney place, near the present site of Dufur. Father traded our place to Mrs. Upton for two large mares, Pet and Pigeon. Afterward father moved to Eight-Mile creek, purchasing a farm from "Big Steve" Edwards, and there mother died in the fall of , leaving two sons and two daughters, one a baby less than a year old. The hard winter of nearly wiped father off the map financially.

He had only thirty head of stock left when the snow went off in the spring. Susan Griffin, my mother's sister, died shortly alter we children went there. Father and Fred Flora had started in the spring of with a herd of cattle for the Orofino mines in Idaho. My sister did the housework. When J. Broadwell bought the place my sister Sarah and I stayed with him for two years.

My brother Willie went to Idaho with my father, who purchased a mine in the Boise basin and later moved to Rocky Bar, in Alturas county, that state. He was absent two years and brought home fourteen hundred dollars. He built a mill on Fifteen-Mile creek near the Meadows, also owning a mill on the Columbia, opposite Wind river, and this he later sold to Joseph T. While operating the plant he built a small steamboat to handle the lumber. After disposing of his mills father worked for a time at his trade and aided in constructing the shoe factory in North Dalles.

In father married Mrs. Elizabeth Herbert, a widow, who had two children: Mrs. Jane Sherer, deceased; and George A. Herbert, now a resident of Baker, Oregon. The mother of these children passed away at The Dalles and father's death occurred at Cascade Locks, Oregon, in My sister Sarah, the oldest of the family, was born in Missouri in On May 10, , she became the wife of William Frizzell, and her demise occurred in at Cascade Locks.

My brother William was born in Benton county, Oregon, in and is now living in Oakland, California. I was the third child and my full name is Daniel Lycurgus Cates. My sister Susan was born February 14, , in Wasco county, Oregon. She became the wife of W. Wilson, a well known attorney of Portland, Oregon, and died February 14, Cates attended the public schools at The Dalles and one of his instructors was Professor S.

From until he was in the employ of his father, who at that time was operating a saw mill above Cascade Locks, where the town of Wyeth is now located. His lumber yard at The Dalles was managed by Daniel L.

Cates, who afterward became a bookkeeper for John H. Larsen, a dealer in wool and hides. Cates remained until , when he was appointed a deputy under George Herbert, sheriff of Wasco county, and acted in that capacity for four years. In he was elected sheriff and served for two years, thoroughly justifying the trust reposed in him.

In August, , he located at Cascade Locks, opening a general store, which he conducted during the construction of the locks. About five hundred men were at work and in the locks were completed by J. At that time Mr. Cates disposed of the business and established a drug store, of which he was the proprietor for two years.

Crossing the Columbia river, he purchased a tract of three hundred and twenty acres in Skamania county, Washington, and applied himself to the task of clearing the land. He cut down the timber, which he sawed into logs, and disposed of them at a good figure. A few years later he sold the ranch and in November, , returned to The Dalles. Prosperity had attended his various undertakings and for a time he lived retired. In he was prevailed upon to reenter the arena of public affairs and has since been city recorder.

His duties are discharged with characteristic thoroughness and fidelity and his continued retention in the office proves that his services are appreciated. On October 9, , Mr. Cates is the ninth in line of descent from Jan Stryker, who was born in Holland in and emigrated from Ruinen, a village in the province of Drenthe, with his wife, two sons and four daughters, arriving at New Amsterdam in The mother of these children was Lambertje Seubering, who died several years after the family came to America.

She survived her husband, who was a man of prominence in colonial days. In he was elected chief magistrate of Midworet and according to the Colonial History of New York" he was a member of the embassy sent from New Amsterdam to the lord mayors in Holland.

The history also states that he became a representative in the general assembly on April 10, , a member of the Hempstead convention of , and was commissioned captain of a military company on October 25, His brother, who also came to this country, was named Jacobus Garretsen Stryker. Jan Stryker and his first wife had a large family. She died June 17, , and his demise occurred June 11, He was high sheriff of Kings county, Long Island; judge of the court from until , and was made captain of a foot company in On June 1, , he purchased four thousand acres of land on Millstone river in Somerset county, New Jersey.

It does not appear that he ever lived on this property but his sons, Jacob and Barends, and his grandsons, the four sons of Jan, removed from Flatbush to New Jersey. Pieter and Annetje Barends Stryker had eleven children. Jan Stryker, their third child, was born August 6, , and in married Margarita Schenck. She was baptized June 2, , and married February 17, Her death occurred July 15, , and her husband passed away August 17, He was a member of the Kings County militia.

Jan Stryker had nine children by his first wife and five by the second. Pieter Stryker, the eldest child of his first wife, was born September 14, , at Flatbush, Long island, and about married Antje Deremer. Death summoned him on December 28, He had eleven children by his first wife and one by the second.

His son, John Stryker, the eighth child of his first union, was born March 2, , and became captain of the Somerset County militia but was afterwards attached to the state troops. His marriage with Lydia Cornell was solemnized November 13, , and on March 25, , he responded to the final summons. His wife was born March 15, , and died November 4, John and Lydia Cornell Stryker were the parents of ten children.

James I. She was born November 5, , and died about in Cayuga county, New York, while his demise occurred December 14, Their family numbered eight children. Stryker died December 2, , in Vancouver, Washington, and her husband's death occurred in that city on December 21, In their family were four daughters, of whom Alice is the eldest.

By her marriage to Daniel L. Cates she became the mother of four children. The fourth child died in infancy. Cates takes a keen interest in fraternal affairs and is a charter member of The Dalles Lodge of the Knights of Pythias, in which he has filled all of the chairs.

In all matters of citizenship he is loyal, progressive and public-spirited and his personal qualities are such as make for popularity. Clarke Publishing Company - ] Chrisman, Levi No public official of Wasco county enjoys a higher reputation than Levi Chrisman, who has served continuously as sheriff for a period of twenty-two years, and represents the third generation of the family in Oregon.

In , when their son Campbell E. Margaret Chrisman there passed away in and her husband remained on the ranch until He then sold the place and came to The Dalles, where he lived retired until his death a few years later. Campbell E. Chrisman was educated in the public schools of Dayton and remained at home until , when he moved to The Dalles. For a time he leased the ranch near Dufur and about purchased the property.

He cultivated the farm until and then sold the tract. Returning to The Dalles, he became a dealer in grain and conducted a grocery and a feed store. Catering to both the wholesale and retail trades, he established a large patronage and continued the business until , when he retired.

He served on the school board and manifested a deep interest in matters touching the welfare and progress of his community. Her parents, John E. Her father was a Christian minister and one of the early circuit riders of Oregon, traveling on horseback to isolated districts in order to spread the Gospel. He passed away early in the '70s and his widow survived him by ten years. The demise of Campbell E. Chrisman occurred May 15, , at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Taylor, a resident of The Dalles, and on February 20, , his widow was called to her final rest.

To their union were born seven children. Lulu, the eldest, was born on the homestead near Dufur and is the widow of Henry Taylor. She has two children: Mrs. Lulu P. Hugh Chrisman is sheriff of Sherman county and has been the incumbent of the office for eight years. Levi is the next of the family and his brother Frank lives in Oakland, California. Emma, the seventh in order of birth, died in infancy.

For four years he was a railroad employe and in ventured in business for himself at The Dalles. In partnership with his brother Frank he opened a meat market, which he conducted successfully for sixteen years, also dealing in live stock. He was elected sheriff of Wasco county on the republican ticket in and his long retention in this office is an eloquent testimonial to the quality of his service.

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Sunday, March 13, ntain That Good Fare Is Good for Lent. A General Dispensation Granted Itself by Local Swelldom. Hiss Hilliard's Readings and. Mark, who is living in Kansas; Paul and Roy, who are located in Colorado; Herbert, In the party were father's cousin, Ambrose Newton, who brought his wife and three Catering to both the wholesale and retail trades, he established a large Mrs. Sarah Mitchell and her daughters, Mrs. Schenck and Albert Bettingen. to find out more about Paul and connect with Burtie Green Bettingen. The Stanley Bruce's Gourmet Catering Inc. Linda and Ambrose Fisher. Gloria and​.