terms used in cricket betting lines

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Terms used in cricket betting lines odds nba betting picks

Terms used in cricket betting lines

For a batsman, hitting the ball for six is behind only getting to a fifty or a century in terms of the most satisfying experiences you can have. Seeing the ball disappear into the stands as the fielders watch on helplessly is not only a big fillip to the batsman himself but also a big boost to the team as a whole as a six is obviously the maximum amount of runs you can get from a single delivery; no-balls excluded. With most bookmakers, you can bet on which team will get the most sixes.

A good way to research the market is to look at how many sixes the side concedes per match, as well as of course being aware of how many sixes they hit themselves, on average. Customers playing this market should pay particular attention to which format the upcoming game will be played in.

For example, the West Indies may not hit that many sixes compared to other teams when it comes to Test matches but when they play in T20s, the likes of Chris Gayle, Kieron Pollard, Andre Russell and Sunil Narine prefer to go big even if that means taking risks, rather than accumulating their runs through singles and twos. Meaning the Windies are normally a good bet in this market.

The opening partnership means the two openers; the batsmen who open the innings at the top of the order. The runs scored by the opening partnership are how many runs they get between them until one of them gets out, including any extras. So if Tendulkar got 30 runs, Ganguly got 20 and there were a further five runs in extras before one of the two got out, the opening partnership would be worth 55 runs.

Opening partnership betting is, therefore, trying to predict which of the two teams will put on the most runs before the first wicket falls. Winner FT betting, sometimes also known as match-winner betting or match odds betting, is quite simply betting on who will win a particular cricket match.

With two notable exceptions. In these circumstances, all bets on the winner FT market will be void. The second exception is where the match ends in a tie not to be confused with a draw, see below. In some cases, teams will play a Super Over- as famously happened in the final of the World Cup- and the winner of the Super Over is declared the winner and the winner FT betting market will be settled accordingly.

Ahead of a Super Over, each team nominates three batsmen to face one over. In other words, a team can use a maximum of three batsmen in a Super Over- the two openers - and one more who comes in at the fall of the first wicket. The opposition then has to try to chase that total the same way they would in any other limited-overs match but again, only have one Over in which to do it. In a bid to rectify that happening again, the likes of the Big Bash organisers have decided that a second Super Over will be played in the event of a tied Super Over and any more Super Overs that are needed until an actual winner is found.

Duckworth-Lewis-Stern DLS aims to find a fair target for the side batting second by trying to reach a score with a reduced number of overs that would be as difficult to chase as it would have been if they had batted the full allocation of overs.

After each over under DLS, the target score is adjusted based on how many overs there are left and how many wickets the team batting still has in hand. That means that if the rain arrives during the second innings, everyone will always know if the team is ahead or behind the DLS total at any given moment. So, if the game came to a permanent halt because it was raining too much, India would either be behind the DLS score when the match was called off and lose it or ahead of the DLS score and win it when the Umpires stopped the game.

Frequent loss of wickets during a DLS-adjusted target, tend to make the target rise very quickly. Decimal odds betting is the form of displaying odds that are used in online betting in India and most European countries as well. The key thing to remember with decimal odds is that 2. Decimal odds tend to be preferred to the traditional fractional odds for two main reasons.

The first is that the odds themselves are easier to understand than fractional odds. Secondly, decimal odds already have your stake built into them. So if you backed Sri Lanka at 2. These days any betting company worth its salt will offer live betting, sometimes also known as in-play or in-running betting. Live betting means betting on a cricket match after it has already started.

The idea behind live betting is that customers have the chance to watch the game and draw their conclusions rather than having to place all their bets before a ball has even been bowled. The odds-compilers at the betting company are constantly changing the odds based on the state of play in the game so customers need to be aware that the odds at one given moment might have changed thirty seconds later if something significant happened in the meanwhile, like a boundary being scored or a wicket falling.

Most of the time live betting is offered until the very last ball of the match, with tight run chases in limited-overs matches leading to particularly volatile betting heats where one team is favourite and then just a couple of minutes later, the other team has gone favourite. Any cricket match starts with one team batting the first time around. In Test matches, teams normally bat twice, while in limited-overs games they only ever bat once excluding Super Overs, of course.

At the start of the innings, the betting company may decide that they think India will score roughly The 0. In live betting, the innings runs betting line is constantly changing. So in the example above, maybe the lines would be runs or under, and runs or over.

A par score is the number of runs that a team is expected to score when batting first. Bangalore is famous for having a good batting wicket and small boundaries so the commentators, analysts and captains may declare that is a par score. The reason commentators love talking about a par score is that it gives a good indication of how well the team batting first has batted and how difficult the task of chasing is for the team batting second.

Betting value means being offered odds that are more generous than what they should be. The simplest possible example of that would be if someone offered you odds of 2. In both cases, the true odds should be 2. As are those of someone being a top batsman. Still, if Virat Kohli was available at odds of 3. But if a bookmaker offered you odds of 5.

Value is important because it ensures that if you have a winning bet, you get paid out more than you probably should have. A dead-heat is when two or more outcomes in a market end up tied. The best example of this would be in a top batsman betting market. So Stokes and Root would be dead-heated. When a bet is dead-heated between two different outcomes, you get paid out at half the odds or the full odds for half your stake, which comes to the same thing.

In the top bowler betting market where if two players have the same number of wickets, it goes down to the number of runs conceded. Double chance betting means that rather than having just the one outcome going for you, you have two. The best example of this would be in a Test match, where there are three outcomes: Team A, Team B and the draw. You might decide that India have the weapons to deny Australia and that the best bet is to go with either an India win or a draw, especially if India are lucky enough to win the toss and bat first.

From time to time betting companies may decide to reward a customer with a cricket betting bonus for being loyal and doing their betting with that Sportsbook rather than another one. A common form of cricket betting bonus is to give a customer a free bet. If the free bet wins, the customers get to keep the winnings generally not the stake as well although they may have to fulfil certain wagering requirements i.

Another form of a cricket betting bonus might be to give a customer extra money when they make their next deposit or to give them higher odds than usual as a one-off, on a particular outcome. Combo betting is wagering on more than one outcome within the same bet. In normal circumstances, cricket bettors will place just one bet, known as a single, and it either wins or loses or is void or dead-heated, in rare cases.

Or betting on the Windies to score over runs against England, is also a single. A good example of combo betting is when there are two matches on the same day in the IPL. The good news is the odds o the two teams are multiplied by one another.

So if Mumbai are 1. The bad news is that you need both parts of the bet to win for you to have a winning combo. You could bet that Rohit Sharma top-scored for Mumbai in the first match and that Kolkata scored over runs batting first in the second match. Nor do you have to limit your combos to just two selections; you can have five or six different selections in your combo if you wish. The term hedging comes from the financial world where it means doing the opposite of what you originally did.

So for example, you might gamble that the US dollar will go up and then when it does, you then bet that it will go down, with the difference between the two bets securing you a profit. In cricket betting, hedging can apply to both the bookmaker and the customer. An example of a bookmaker hedging a bet would be if they took a very large bet from a customer and then hedged the same bet with another bookmaker to reduce their liability. A customer may hedge their bet as a way of making sure that the win at least something after having placed a good bet to start with.

Any cricket match officially starts the moment the toss is held. Both captains go out to the middle and a match referee or commentator will conduct the toss, where the captain who calls correctly decides whether he wants to bat first or field first. Win the toss betting is quite simply, wagering on which team will…win the toss.

Not only that but win the toss betting should have odds of 2. Some betting companies take it a step further and have four runners rather than two, adding what the captain who wins the toss will do to the equation. So rather than the market being just: India to win the toss and South Africa to win the toss, it would be: India win and bat, India win and bowl, South Africa win and bat, South Africa win and bowl.

Ahead of any major tournament, like a World Cup or the IPL, bookmakers will offer odds not just on who will win the tournament or but also who will be the batsman scoring the most runs but also the bowler taking the most wickets. For example, when Rohit Sharma was top batsman at the Cricket World Cup, he was available at odds of around So if Sharma gets a century in his first match his odds will shorten, whereas if Virat Kohli gets out for just 10 in his first match, his odds will lengthen.

Not all batsman betting is about which player scores the most runs. Bookmakers also offer odds on exactly how many runs a particular batsman may score in their innings. For example, if the Mumbai Indians are playing the Delhi Capitals, bookmakers may decide that they think Quinton de Kock will score roughly In other cases, they might make it a three-runner market and offer more options. For example, it might be: de Kock 30 runs or less, runs, 41 runs or more. A betting stake is how much you wager on a particular bet.

Most bookmakers have a minimum and maximum stake per bet. In general, a new customer should expect to have a lower maximum stake allowed than a loyal customer who has been betting with that bookmaker for a while. When you see odds offered about any event, ranging from the winner of a cricket match to how many sixes will be scored in any given game, the odds are set by someone called an odds-compiler.

After doing all this research, the odds-compiler may decide that India deserve to be 1. Odds-compilers are also responsible for offering ever-changing odds during a match through live betting. Short for Umpire Decision Review System, DRS involves using technology to rectify blatant umpiring mistakes in an attempt to make the game as fair and error-free as possible from an umpiring point of view.

It can also happen the other way. If they use DRS and are shown to be wrong, they lose their review. But if they use it and are proved to be right or the decision is marginal, then they get to keep their review. Log in. Odds: Decimal. Feb 8 Mon, Today's Events. Live Betting. If you think, for example, Pakistan to win a test match against India, is offered at good-value odds, but you want to make sure you'll get something even if both teams do not take twenty wickets or the match is abandoned, this bet will ensure that happens.

Draw No Bet is a popular option because it offers bettors a get-out clause if their chosen bet does not come to fruition. This is because a draw will mean the stake is returned. This is great in a test cricket match, because this is the one form of sport where a match can take place for five days, and still end in a draw. Equally, bad weather or poor bowling can mean that a dominant team still ends up drawing from a winning position.

If you think England can beat Australia in an Ashes test, but you're not certain you'll get this result, placing your stake on Draw No Bet means that if England win, you get the return offered by the bookie, but if the match ends in a draw, you still get the money you deposited back. In the event of an Australia win, you'd lose your stake - but that's the only losing possibility. This betting market takes out some of the risk, but none of the excitement, from cricket betting.

Maybe you've studied the opening batsmen for the team you're watching, and noticed that six of his last seven dismissals were for Leg Before Wicket, or that he leaves his stumps unprotected too many times by going for crazy pull-shots. If so, this betting market is for you. First Dismissal covers the player who is the first to have his wicket taken. This is obviously the number-one or number-two batsman - this means you've only got two players to monitor on a team when you're formulating your betting strategy.

Check their stats and scorecards over the past few matches, to see if the player is being out-thought by bowlers on some basic part of his game. As ever, knowledge is power. For example, when he used to open the batting for England, a lot of Andrew Strauss's early-career dismissals were for overly-aggressive pull-shots.

Although these were often caught, they could also result in him being bowled, or in an LBW. This information helps you decide your betting strategy. This means you're placing a bet on the possibility of a total number of runs being over or under a predetermined figure. If you bet England's two openers against Australia to score less than This is another great wager for if you're watching a match and betting in-play. Maybe the match on the screen isn't the most exciting - but by predicting the number of games, you can amp up the tension, and make that bit more "at-stake" for you and your fellow bettors.

Simple to understand, this market also swings on the knowledge you have of players and how likely they are to get good scores, based on their opponents and their records in previous matches. There are two kinds of Top Batsman bet - there's the one for a specific team, and for the whole match, too.

The bet based on a specific team relies on your knowledge of only one of the participants in a cricket match. That means the risk is reduced, but so too are the odds.

OFF TRACK BETTING BOSTON

If they both executed two run-outs, or somewhat more likely none, then the draw would be the winner. Which is normally the favourite. So what does one look for when playing this market? You generally want to side with the team who has the best fielders or go against a side who has a reputation for having batsmen who are slow or lazy when it comes to running between the wickets.

Virat Kohli is available at odds of 3. Kohli in this scenario is the favourite; the player with the shortest odds on winning. If Sharma was also 3. If you were looking at the match winner market and India were 1. And if it were a Test match between India and Pakistan where lots of rain was expected to mean a lot of time would be lost from the game, then the draw might bet the shortest-priced of the three outcomes.

In this case, the draw would be favourite. So betting on whether a century is going to be scored is a pretty logical thing to be able to bet on. Customers should, however, be aware that betting on whether a century is going to be scored or not comes in different forms. The first is quite simply whether a century will be scored in the match by…anyone.

In other cases, the market applies only to the first or second innings of the match. For example, the next T20 World Cup will take place in and the best bookmakers, such as 10CRIC, have already priced up all of the different teams so you can select who you think might go on to win it. The good thing about outright betting is that if you do your research well in advance, you can work out who has the players and skills to go on to win a particular tournament.

However, with outright betting, you need the side to actually go on and win the tournament. Above we looked at outright betting and towards the end, we stressed the importance of the team actually going on to win it rather than just making the semis or being beaten in the final. With most bookmakers, you can also bet on a team just making the final. In terms of the odds, backing a team to make the final rather than winning it outright, are generally half what they would be in comparison to win the tournament.

For a batsman, hitting the ball for six is behind only getting to a fifty or a century in terms of the most satisfying experiences you can have. Seeing the ball disappear into the stands as the fielders watch on helplessly is not only a big fillip to the batsman himself but also a big boost to the team as a whole as a six is obviously the maximum amount of runs you can get from a single delivery; no-balls excluded.

With most bookmakers, you can bet on which team will get the most sixes. A good way to research the market is to look at how many sixes the side concedes per match, as well as of course being aware of how many sixes they hit themselves, on average. Customers playing this market should pay particular attention to which format the upcoming game will be played in. For example, the West Indies may not hit that many sixes compared to other teams when it comes to Test matches but when they play in T20s, the likes of Chris Gayle, Kieron Pollard, Andre Russell and Sunil Narine prefer to go big even if that means taking risks, rather than accumulating their runs through singles and twos.

Meaning the Windies are normally a good bet in this market. The opening partnership means the two openers; the batsmen who open the innings at the top of the order. The runs scored by the opening partnership are how many runs they get between them until one of them gets out, including any extras. So if Tendulkar got 30 runs, Ganguly got 20 and there were a further five runs in extras before one of the two got out, the opening partnership would be worth 55 runs.

Opening partnership betting is, therefore, trying to predict which of the two teams will put on the most runs before the first wicket falls. Winner FT betting, sometimes also known as match-winner betting or match odds betting, is quite simply betting on who will win a particular cricket match.

With two notable exceptions. In these circumstances, all bets on the winner FT market will be void. The second exception is where the match ends in a tie not to be confused with a draw, see below. In some cases, teams will play a Super Over- as famously happened in the final of the World Cup- and the winner of the Super Over is declared the winner and the winner FT betting market will be settled accordingly.

Ahead of a Super Over, each team nominates three batsmen to face one over. In other words, a team can use a maximum of three batsmen in a Super Over- the two openers - and one more who comes in at the fall of the first wicket. The opposition then has to try to chase that total the same way they would in any other limited-overs match but again, only have one Over in which to do it.

In a bid to rectify that happening again, the likes of the Big Bash organisers have decided that a second Super Over will be played in the event of a tied Super Over and any more Super Overs that are needed until an actual winner is found. Duckworth-Lewis-Stern DLS aims to find a fair target for the side batting second by trying to reach a score with a reduced number of overs that would be as difficult to chase as it would have been if they had batted the full allocation of overs.

After each over under DLS, the target score is adjusted based on how many overs there are left and how many wickets the team batting still has in hand. That means that if the rain arrives during the second innings, everyone will always know if the team is ahead or behind the DLS total at any given moment. So, if the game came to a permanent halt because it was raining too much, India would either be behind the DLS score when the match was called off and lose it or ahead of the DLS score and win it when the Umpires stopped the game.

Frequent loss of wickets during a DLS-adjusted target, tend to make the target rise very quickly. Decimal odds betting is the form of displaying odds that are used in online betting in India and most European countries as well. The key thing to remember with decimal odds is that 2. Decimal odds tend to be preferred to the traditional fractional odds for two main reasons.

The first is that the odds themselves are easier to understand than fractional odds. Secondly, decimal odds already have your stake built into them. So if you backed Sri Lanka at 2. These days any betting company worth its salt will offer live betting, sometimes also known as in-play or in-running betting. Live betting means betting on a cricket match after it has already started. The idea behind live betting is that customers have the chance to watch the game and draw their conclusions rather than having to place all their bets before a ball has even been bowled.

The odds-compilers at the betting company are constantly changing the odds based on the state of play in the game so customers need to be aware that the odds at one given moment might have changed thirty seconds later if something significant happened in the meanwhile, like a boundary being scored or a wicket falling.

Most of the time live betting is offered until the very last ball of the match, with tight run chases in limited-overs matches leading to particularly volatile betting heats where one team is favourite and then just a couple of minutes later, the other team has gone favourite. Any cricket match starts with one team batting the first time around. In Test matches, teams normally bat twice, while in limited-overs games they only ever bat once excluding Super Overs, of course.

At the start of the innings, the betting company may decide that they think India will score roughly The 0. In live betting, the innings runs betting line is constantly changing. So in the example above, maybe the lines would be runs or under, and runs or over. A par score is the number of runs that a team is expected to score when batting first. Bangalore is famous for having a good batting wicket and small boundaries so the commentators, analysts and captains may declare that is a par score.

The reason commentators love talking about a par score is that it gives a good indication of how well the team batting first has batted and how difficult the task of chasing is for the team batting second. Betting value means being offered odds that are more generous than what they should be. The simplest possible example of that would be if someone offered you odds of 2. In both cases, the true odds should be 2. As are those of someone being a top batsman. Still, if Virat Kohli was available at odds of 3.

But if a bookmaker offered you odds of 5. Value is important because it ensures that if you have a winning bet, you get paid out more than you probably should have. A dead-heat is when two or more outcomes in a market end up tied. The best example of this would be in a top batsman betting market. So Stokes and Root would be dead-heated.

When a bet is dead-heated between two different outcomes, you get paid out at half the odds or the full odds for half your stake, which comes to the same thing. In the top bowler betting market where if two players have the same number of wickets, it goes down to the number of runs conceded.

Double chance betting means that rather than having just the one outcome going for you, you have two. The best example of this would be in a Test match, where there are three outcomes: Team A, Team B and the draw. You might decide that India have the weapons to deny Australia and that the best bet is to go with either an India win or a draw, especially if India are lucky enough to win the toss and bat first. From time to time betting companies may decide to reward a customer with a cricket betting bonus for being loyal and doing their betting with that Sportsbook rather than another one.

A common form of cricket betting bonus is to give a customer a free bet. If the free bet wins, the customers get to keep the winnings generally not the stake as well although they may have to fulfil certain wagering requirements i. Another form of a cricket betting bonus might be to give a customer extra money when they make their next deposit or to give them higher odds than usual as a one-off, on a particular outcome.

Combo betting is wagering on more than one outcome within the same bet. In normal circumstances, cricket bettors will place just one bet, known as a single, and it either wins or loses or is void or dead-heated, in rare cases. Or betting on the Windies to score over runs against England, is also a single.

A good example of combo betting is when there are two matches on the same day in the IPL. The good news is the odds o the two teams are multiplied by one another. So if Mumbai are 1. The bad news is that you need both parts of the bet to win for you to have a winning combo. You could bet that Rohit Sharma top-scored for Mumbai in the first match and that Kolkata scored over runs batting first in the second match.

Nor do you have to limit your combos to just two selections; you can have five or six different selections in your combo if you wish. The term hedging comes from the financial world where it means doing the opposite of what you originally did. So for example, you might gamble that the US dollar will go up and then when it does, you then bet that it will go down, with the difference between the two bets securing you a profit.

In cricket betting, hedging can apply to both the bookmaker and the customer. An example of a bookmaker hedging a bet would be if they took a very large bet from a customer and then hedged the same bet with another bookmaker to reduce their liability. A customer may hedge their bet as a way of making sure that the win at least something after having placed a good bet to start with.

Any cricket match officially starts the moment the toss is held. Both captains go out to the middle and a match referee or commentator will conduct the toss, where the captain who calls correctly decides whether he wants to bat first or field first. Win the toss betting is quite simply, wagering on which team will…win the toss. Not only that but win the toss betting should have odds of 2. Some betting companies take it a step further and have four runners rather than two, adding what the captain who wins the toss will do to the equation.

So rather than the market being just: India to win the toss and South Africa to win the toss, it would be: India win and bat, India win and bowl, South Africa win and bat, South Africa win and bowl. Ahead of any major tournament, like a World Cup or the IPL, bookmakers will offer odds not just on who will win the tournament or but also who will be the batsman scoring the most runs but also the bowler taking the most wickets.

For example, when Rohit Sharma was top batsman at the Cricket World Cup, he was available at odds of around So if Sharma gets a century in his first match his odds will shorten, whereas if Virat Kohli gets out for just 10 in his first match, his odds will lengthen. That is why we have decided to compile a list of the most common betting terms when it comes to cricket as well as betting in general.

This list should be easily understandable for those familiar with the sport as well as for those who know only the basics. As with all glossaries the list is alphabetically ordered. For example, if the limit is 3. If there are 4 runs scored the winning bet is Over. Both of them concerning the number of runs in the 1st Innings. These bets are usually offered only for the longest version of cricket matches — Test matches.

The two possible bets are Yes and No. A Fifty or a Hundred to Be Scored in the Match — Again two markets, however, unlike the previous two, these take the whole match into consideration. The odds that a player will score 50 or a runs in a match are the highest for Twenty20 matches, reasonably high for One Day matches and expectedly low for Test matches.

Batsman Matches — A market in which imaginary duels are formed by the betting provider and the batsman with the highest total number of runs is the winner of the duel. Dead Heat — A situation in which there are two or more winners in a betting event. For example, if there are two batsmen with the same number of runs, dead heat rules apply and the bet is worth half the original stake.

Draw no Bet — A market only given by the betting provider when there is the possibility of a draw Test Series. There are only two possible outcomes in this market 1 or 2. If the game ends in a draw single bets on the match will be refunded whereas all up bets accumulator tickets remain valid at the odds of 1. Futures — Wagers placed on an event occurring in the future. For example, betting on the outcomes and winners of Twenty20 Big Bash Hedging — Placing wagers on the opposite side.

Usually done to safeguard the bet and to cut losses in case the original bet is lost. Highest Opening Partnership — The team which fields the opening partnership with the highest total of runs is the winner in this market. The favourite to win the match always has lower odds for its opening partnership.

Man of the Match — The individual who produces the best performance in a cricket match is voted as the Man of the Match. Most Match Sixes — Punters choose which of the two teams will hit the most sixes a shot which passes over or touches the boundary without having bounced or rolled. Most Run-Outs — The team which creates the most run-outs whilst fielding is the winner in this market.

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Follow through a bowler's body actions after the release of the ball to stabilise their body. Footwork the necessary foot steps that a batsman has to take so as to be at a comfortable distance from where the ball has pitched, just right to hit the ball anywhere he desires, negating any spin or swing that a bowler attempts to extract after bouncing.

Forward defence a commonly-employed defensive shot. Four a shot that reaches the boundary after bouncing, so called because it scores four runs to the batting side. Free hit a penalty given in some forms of cricket when a bowler bowls a no-ball.

The bowler must bowl another delivery, and the batsman cannot be out off that delivery except by being run out. Between the no-ball and the free hit, the fielders may not change positions unless the batsmen changed ends on the no-ball. French cricket an informal form of the game. The term "playing French Cricket" can be used by commentators to indicate that a batsman has not moved his feet and looks ungainly because of this.

French Cut also Chinese Cut or Surrey cut or Harrow drive an inside edge which misses hitting the stumps by a few centimetres. Front foot in a batsman's stance the front foot is the foot that is nearer to the bowler. Front foot contact is the position of the bowler at the moment when his front foot lands on the ground just prior to delivering the ball.

Front-foot shot a shot played with the batsman's weight on his front foot i. Full length a delivery that pitches closer to the batsman than a ball pitching on a good length, but further away than a half-volley. Full toss also full bunger a delivery that reaches the batsman on the full, i. Usually considered a bad delivery to bowl as the batsman has a lot of time to see the ball and play an attacking shot. Also, it does not have a chance to change direction off the ground, making it the ultimate crime for a spin or seam bowler.

Considered facetious as there is not really a point to it. Gazunder a delivery that fails to bounce to the expected height after bouncing, thus beating the batsman and "goes under" the bat. Often results in batsmen being out bowled. Getting your eye in when the batsman takes his time to assess the condition of the pitch, ball or weather etc before starting to attempt more risky strokes.

Glance the shot played very fine behind the batsman on the leg side. A glance is typically played on a short-pitched ball. See also flick. Glove part of a batsman's kit worn to protect the hands from accidental injury. When a hand is in contact with the bat it is considered part of the bat and so a player can be given out caught to a ball that came off the glove hence "gloved a catch.

Golden pair also King pair a dismissal for nought zero runs off the first ball faced in each of a batsman's two innings of a two-innings match see this list of Pairs in test and first class cricket. Good length the ideal place for a stock delivery to pitch in its trajectory from the bowler to the batsman. It makes the batsman uncertain whether to play a front-foot or back-foot shot.

A good length differs from bowler to bowler, based on the type and speed of the bowler. The "good length" is not necessarily the best length to bowl, as a bowler may wish to bowl short or full to exploit a batsman's weaknesses. Googly a deceptive spinning delivery by a leg spin bowler, also known particularly in Australia as the wrong 'un. For a right-hander bowler and a right-handed batsman, a googly will turn from the off side to the leg side.

Developed by Bosanquet around , and formerly called a bosie or bosey. Gouging causing intentional damage to the pitch or ball. Grafting batting defensively with strong emphasis on not getting out, often under difficult conditions. Green Top a pitch with an unusually high amount of visible grass, that might be expected to assist the bowlers. Grip the rubber casings used on the handle of the bat. The term is also used to describe how the bowler holds the ball and how the batsman holds the bat.

Groundsman or curator a person responsible for maintaining the cricket field and preparing the pitch. Grubber a delivery that barely bounces. Taking Guard the batsman aligning his bat according with a stump or between stumps chosen behind him.

Typically, the batter marks the position of the bat on the pitch. See also LBW. Gully a close fielder near the slip fielders, at an angle to a line between the two sets of stumps of about to degrees. A poor defensive stance and lack of defensive strokes are also features of a hack. Can also be used to describe one particular stroke Half Century an individual score of over 50 runs, reasonably significant landmark for a batsman and more so for the lower order and the tail-enders.

Half-tracker another term for a long hop. So called because the ball roughly bounces halfway down the pitch. Half-volley a delivery that bounces just short of the block hole. Usually easy to drive or glance away. Harrow Drive also known as Chinese Cut or French cut a misplayed shot by the batsman which comes off the inside edge and narrowly misses hitting the stumps, typically going to fine leg. Hat-trick a bowler taking a wicket off each of three consecutive deliveries that he bowls whether in the same over or split up in two consecutive overs, or two overs in two different spells.

Hat-trick ball a delivery bowled after taking two wickets with the previous two deliveries. The captain will usually set a very attacking field for a hat-trick ball, to maximise the chances of the bowler taking a hat-trick. Hawk-Eye a computer-generated graphic showing the probable trajectory of the ball if it were not hindered by the batsman. Used by commentators to estimate whether an lbw decision was correctly made by an umpire, as well as to assess bowlers' deliveries.

Hit wicket a batsman getting out by dislodging the bails of the wicket behind him either with his bat or body as he tries to play the ball or set off for a run. Hoik an unrefined shot played to the leg side usually across the line of the ball.

Hoodoo A bowler is said to 'have the hoodoo' on a batsman when they have got them out many times in their career. See rabbit II. Hook a shot, similar to a pull, but played so that the ball is struck when it is above the batsman's shoulder. Hot Spot a technology used in television coverage used to evaluate snicks and bat-pad catches.

The batsman is filmed with an infrared camera, and friction caused by the strike of the ball shows up as a white "hot spot" on the picture. Hutch the pavilion or dressing room, especially one that is home to a large number of rabbits. Incoming batsman the batsman next to come in in the listed batting order. The incoming batsman defined thus is the one who is out when a "Timed Out" occurs. Indipper a delivery that curves into the batsman before pitching. Inswing or in-swinger a delivery that curves into the batsman in the air from off to leg.

In-Cutter a delivery that moves into the batsman after hitting the surface. Infield the region of the field that lies inside the 30 yard circle 27 m or, in the days before defined circles, the area of the field close to the wicket bounded by an imaginary line through square leg, mid on, mid off and cover point. Innings one player's or one team's turn to bat or bowl. Unlike in baseball, and perhaps somewhat confusingly, in cricket the term "innings" is both singular and plural.

King pair also Golden pair a batsman who gets out for zero runs off the first ball he faces in both innings of a two-innings match see this list of Pairs in test and first class cricket. Knock a batsman's innings. A batsman who makes a high score in an innings can be said to have had a "good knock". Kolpak an overseas players who plays in English domestic cricket under the Kolpak ruling.

Kwik cricket an informal form of the game, specifically designed to introduce children to the sport. Comes from the English 'lap', and old term for a stroke somewhere between a pull and a sweep. Leading edge the ball hitting the front edge of the bat as opposed to its face, when playing a cross-bat shot such as a pull.

Often results in an easy catch for the bowler or a skier for someone else. Leave noun the action of the batsman not attempting to play at the ball. He may do this by holding the bat above his body. However, there is a clause in the LBW rules making him more susceptible to getting out this way. He may also not claim any leg byes, because if he does, the Umpire will call Dead Ball and runs will not be allowed Leg before wicket LBW a way of dismissing the batsman. In brief, the batsman is out if, in the opinion of the umpire, the ball hits any part of the batsman's body usually the leg before hitting the bat and would have gone on to hit the stumps.

Leg break a leg spin delivery which, for a right-hander bowler and a right-handed batsman, will turn from the leg side to the off side usually away from the batsman. Leg bye extras taken after a delivery hits any part of the body of the batsman other than the bat or the gloved hand that holds the bat.

If the batsman makes no attempt to play the ball with the bat, leg byes may not be scored. Leg cutter a break delivery bowled by a fast or medium-pace bowler with similar action to a spin bowler, but at a faster pace. The ball breaks from the leg side to the off side of the batsman. Leg glance a delicate shot played at a ball aimed slightly on the leg side, using the bat to flick the ball as it passes the batsman, deflecting towards the square leg or fine leg area.

Leg side the half of the field to the rear of the batsman as he takes strike also known as the on side. Leg slip a fielding position equivalent to a slip, but on the leg side. Leg spin a form of bowling in which the bowler imparts spin on the ball by turning the wrist as the ball is delivered, and for that reason also known as "wrist spin". The stock delivery for a leg spinner is a leg break; other leg spin deliveries include the googly, the top spinner, and the flipper.

The term leg spinner is usually reserved for right handed bowlers who bowl in this manner. Left handers who bowl with wrist spin are known as unorthodox spinners. This is also known as the Chinaman. Leg theory a style of bowling attack where balls are aimed towards the leg side, utilizing several close-in, leg side fielders.

The aim of leg theory is to cramp the batsman so that he has little room to play a shot and will hopefully make a mistake, allowing the close fielders to prevent runs from being scored or to catch him out. Leg theory is considered boring play by spectators and commentators since it forces batsmen to play conservatively, resulting in few runs being scored.

See also fast leg theory and Bodyline. Length the place along the pitch where a delivery bounces see short pitched, good length, half-volley, full toss. Life a noun that refers to a batsman being reprieved because of a mistake by the fielding team, through dropping a catch or the wicket-keeper missing a stumping.

Light short for "bad light. Limited overs match a one-innings match where each side may only face a set number of overs. Another name for one-day cricket. Line also see Line and length the deviation of the point along the pitch where a delivery bounces from the line from wicket-to-wicket to the leg side or the off side. Line and length bowling bowling so that a delivery pitches on a good length and just outside off stump.

This forces the batsman to play a shot as the ball may hit the stumps. List A cricket the limited-overs equivalent of first-class cricket. Long hop a delivery that is much too short to be a good length delivery, but without the sharp lift of a bouncer. Loop the curved path of the ball bowled by a spinner. Loosener a poor delivery bowled at the start of a bowler's spell. Lower order the batsmen who bat at between roughly number 7 and 10 or 11 in the batting order and who are not very good at batting, being either specialist bowlers or wicket-keepers with limited batting ability.

Luncheon the first of the two intervals taken during a full day's play, which usually occurs at lunchtime at about p. Maker's Name The full face of the bat, where the manufacturer's logo is normally located. Used particularly when referring to a batsman's technique when playing a straight drive, e.

Manhattan also called the Skyline. A bar graph the runs scored off each over in a one day game, with dots indicatingthe overs in which wickets fell. The name is alternatively applied to a bar graph showing the number of runs scored in each innings in a batsmen's career. So called because the bars supposedly resemble the skyscrapers that dominate the skyline of Manhattan. Mankad the running out of a non-striking batsman who leaves his crease before the bowler has released the ball.

It is named after Vinoo Mankad, an Indian bowler, who controversially used this method in a Test match. This is relatively common in indoor cricket and is noted separately from run outs, though almost unheard of in first-class cricket. Man of the match In cricket, the Man of the Match award may be given to the highest scoring batsman, leading wicket taker or best overall performance.

Marillier shot a shot played with the bat held parallel to the pitch in front of the batsman, with the toe of the bat pointing towards the bowler. The batsman attempts to flick the ball over the wicket-keeper's head. The most famous exponent of the shot is former Zimbabwean international Douglas Marillier.

Match fixing bribing players of one of the teams to deliberately play poorly, with the intention of cashing in on bets on the result of the game. Match referee an official whose role is to ensure that the spirit of the game is upheld. Meat of the bat the thickest part of the bat, from which the most energy is imparted to the ball.

Medium-pace a bowler who bowls slower than a pace bowler, but faster than a spin bowler. Speed is important to the medium-pacer, but they try and defeat the batsman with the movement of the ball, rather than the pace at which it is bowled. Medium-pacers either bowl cutters or rely on the ball to swing in the air. Michelle five wickets taken by a bowler in an innings, named after actress Michelle Pfeiffer a "five-for". Middle of the bat the area of the face of the bat that imparts maximum power to a shot if that part of the bat hits the ball.

Also known as the "meat" of the bat. Effectively the same as the sweet spot; however, a shot that has been "middled" usually means one that is hit with great power as well as timing. Middle order the batsmen who bat at between roughly number 5 and 8 in the batting order. Military medium medium-pace bowling that lacks the speed to trouble the batsman. Often has derogatory overtones, suggesting the bowling is boring, innocuous, or lacking in variety.

Mis-field a fielder failing to collect the ball cleanly, often fumbling the ball or dropping a catch. Mullygrubber a ball that doesn't bounce after pitching. This term was coined by legendary player and commentator Richie Benaud. Nelson a score of , either of a team or an individual batsman, regarded by some as unlucky.

To prevent bad luck, some people stand on one leg. Scores of and are called Double and Triple Nelson respectively. Nervous nineties the period of batsman's innings when his or her score is between 90 and During this phase many players bat extremely cautiously in order to avoid being out before they obtain a century. Nets a pitch surrounded on three sides by netting, used by for practice by batsman and bowler.

Net run rate NRR the run rate scored by the winning team subtracted by run rate scored by losing team. The winning team gets positive value, losing team the negative value. In a series, the mean of the NRR for all matches played by the team is taken. An edge 2. Recent consistent form, either good or bad, especially while batting. A batsman who has recently scored a lot of runs is in "good nick", a batsman after a run of low scores is in "bad nick".

Nightwatchman in a first-class game a lower order batsman sent in when the light is dimming to play out the remaining overs of the day in order to protect more valuable batsmen for the next days play. No ball an illegal delivery, usually because of the bowler overstepping the popping crease, scoring an extra for the batting side. Full tosses that pass above the waist of the batsman are also deemed no balls.

See beamer. Non-striker the batsman standing at the bowling end. Not out 1. Nurdle to score runs by gently nudging the ball into vacant areas of the field. Also called milking around eg: "He milked the bowler around". Generally the extra players were allowed to field as well as bat and so the bowling side had more than 11 fielders. One Day International ODI a match between two national sides limited to 50 overs per innings, played over at most one day.

Off break an off spin delivery which, for a right-handed bowler and a right-handed batsman, will turn from the off side to the leg side usually into the batsman. Off cutter an off break delivery bowled by a fast or medium-pace bowler which moves into the batsmanafter hitting the surface. The ball breaks from the off-side to the leg side of the batsman. For the right handed batsman this is the right half of the pitch, looking up the wicket towards the bowler, and the left half for the left handed batsman.

Off spin a form of bowling in which the bowler imparts spin on the ball with the fingers as the ball is delivered, and for that reason also known as "finger spin". The usual stock delivery for an off spinner is an off break, but other off spin deliveries includes the arm ball and the doosra. The term off spinner is usually reserved for right handed bowlers who bowl in this manner. Left handers are described as orthodox or unorthodox.

On side the half of the pitch behind the batsman's body as he takes strike i. On a length describing a delivery bowled on a good length. On strike the batsman currently facing the bowling attack is said to be on strike. On the up describes a batsman playing a shot, usually a drive, to a ball that is quite short and has already risen to knee height or more as the shot is played. One-day cricket an abbreviated form of the game, with just one innings per team, usually with a limited number of overs and played over one day.

One down a batsman who bats at 3, a crucial position in the team's batting innings. One short the term used when a batsman fails to make contact with the ground beyond the popping crease, and turns back for an additional run. Opener 1. Orthodox 1. This imparts spin in the same direction as a right-handed leg spin bowler. See: Left-arm orthodox spin. Out 1. Out dipper a dipper that curves away from the batsman before pitching.

Outswing a delivery that curves away from the batsman. Outfield the part of the field lying outside the 30 yard 27 m circle measured from the centre of the pitch or, less formally, the part of the pitch furthest from the wickets. Over the delivery of six consecutive balls by one bowler. Over rate the number of overs bowled per hour. Over the wicket a right-handed bowler bowling to the left of the stumps, and vice-versa for a left-handed bowler.

Overarm the action of bowling with the arm swinging from behind the body over the head, releasing the ball on the down swing without bending the elbow. This type of bowling is the only type allowed in all official cricket matches. Compare with underarm.

Overpitched delivery a delivery that is full pitched but not a yorker, bouncing just in front of the batsman. Considered a poor delivery, as it easy for the batsman to get the middle of the bat to the ball. An overpitched ball is often a half-volley. Overthrows also buzzers the scoring of extra runs due to an errant throw from a fielder. Occasionally used erroneously for any runs scored after a fielder misfields the ball. Also the throw itself. Pace bowlers also use swing. Pads protective equipment for batsmen and wicket-keepers, covering the legs.

Pad away or pad-play use the pads hit the ball away from the wicket, only possible when there is no danger of LBW for example, if the ball pitched on the leg side. Using the pad instead of the bat removes the danger of being caught by close fielders.

Paddle sweep A very fine sweep, almost just a tickle of the delivery pitched on or outside leg stump. Pair a "pair of spectacles" or a "pair of ducks". A batsman's score of nought zero runs in both innings of a two-innings match see this list of Pairs in test and first class cricket.

Partnership the number of runs scored between a pair of batsmen before one of them gets dismissed. This also includes the deliveries faced and time taken. Part Time a bowler who doesn't always bowl but is adequate enough to bowl seldom and is often successful because of variation in performance and their surprising attributes.

Peach a delivery bowled by a fast bowler described as unplayable, usually a really good delivery that a batsman gets out to. Perfect over, The For a bowler, it would be a Maiden over by scoring all 6 wickets within an over. For a batsman, it would be scoring 36 runs or more by extras by scoring all sixes off a single bowler in a single over. Perfume ball a bouncer on or just outside off-stump that passes within inches of the batsman's face. So called because the ball is supposedly close enough to the batsman's face that he can smell it.

Picket fences an over in which one run is scored off each delivery. It looks like picket fences , hence the name. Pie Chucker or Pie Thrower A poor bowler, usually of slow to medium pace whose deliveries are flighted so much as to appear similar to a pie in the air. Considered easy to score off by batsmen - see Buffet Bowling. Pinch hitter a lower order batsman promoted up the batting order to increase the run rate.

The term, if not the precise sense, is borrowed from baseball. Pitch 1. It is 22 yards in length. Pitch It Up to bowl a delivery on a fuller length. Pitch map a diagram showing where a number of balls, usually from a particular bowler, have pitched. Compare beehive. Placement the term used to denote the ball hit, such that it bisects or trisects the fielders placed on the field.

The ball usually ends up being a four. Playing on for the batsman to hit the ball with his bat but only succeed in diverting it onto the stumps. The batsman is thus out bowled. Also known as "dragging on" or "chopping on" Plumb of a dismissal by LBW: indisputable, obvious. Of a wicket, giving true bounce. Point A fielding position square of the batsman's off side. Point of release the position of the bowler at the moment when the ball is released.

Pongo a term used primarily by UK county players to describe a very high volume of run-making, or batting assault. Popper a ball that rises sharply from the pitch when bowled 'pops up'. Powerplay a block of overs that in One Day Internationals offer a temporary advantage to the batting side.

Pro20 South African form of twenty20 Pro40 The name of a limited overs competition played in England towards the late summer. Games are arranged in group stages with later knockout stages for the qualifiers. So named as there are 40 overs per side. Pull a shot played to the leg side to a short-pitched delivery, between mid-wicket and backward square-leg.

Typically total overs in the innings divided by 5, rounded to next highest integer. See also ferret. The term is also used for a higher order batsman who is out frequently to the same bowler, although then most often in the form bunny; for example, Mike Atherton is sometimes described by commentators as "Glenn McGrath's bunny". Rain rule any of various methods of determining which team wins a rain-shortened one-day match.

The current preferred method is the Duckworth-Lewis method. Red cherry a nickname for the red cricket ball. See cherry. Referral a system which allows for batsmen or fielding captains to appeal an umpiring decision to the third umpire. Still in the experimental stage and not currently used for all Test series.

Rest day a non-playing day in the middle of a multiple day game. Retire for a batsman to voluntarily leave the field during his innings, usually because of injury. A player who retires through injury "retired hurt" may return in the same innings at the fall of a wicket, and continue where he left off. A player who is uninjured "retired out" may return only with the opposing captain's consent. Reverse Sweep a right handed batsman sweeping the ball like a left handed batsman and vice-versa.

Reverse swing the art of swinging the ball contrary to how a conventionally swung ball moves in the air; i. Many theories as to how this may occur. Usually happens with an older ball than conventional swing, but not always, atmospheric conditions and bowler skill also being important factors. It has been espoused that once the 'rough' side becomes extremely rough a similar effect to that of a dimpled golf ball may cause it to move more quickly through the air than the 'shiny' side of the ball.

Rib Tickler A ball bowled short of a length that bounces up higher than expected and strikes the batsman in the midriff usually the side and hits several ribs. Not a nice ball to play. Ring field A field which is set primarily to save singles, consisting of fieldsmen in all or most of the primary positions forward of the wicket, on or about the fielding circle or where it would be.

Rogers The 2nd XI of a club or county. Roller an cylindrical implement used to flatten the pitch before play. Rotate the strike to look to make singles wherever possible, in order to ensure that both batsmen are continually facing deliveries and making runs. The opposite of farming the strike. Rough a worn-down section of the pitch, often due to bowlers' footmarks, from which spinners are able to obtain more turn. Roundarm bowling the type of bowling action in which the bowler's outstretched hand is perpendicular to his body when he releases the ball.

Round arm bowling is legal in cricket. Ruby Duck A duck when dismissed without facing a ball. Run rate the average number of runs scored per over. Run up see approach. Runner a player of the batting side assisting an injured batsman in running between the wickets. The runner must wear and carry the same equipment and both the injured batsman and the runner can be run out, the injured batsman having to stay in his ground.

Scorer Someone who scores the progress of the game. Runs, wickets, extras etc Seam the stitching on the ball. Seam bowling a bowling style which uses the uneven conditions of the ball -- specifically the raised seam -- to make it deviate upon bouncing off the pitch. Contrast with swing bowling. Selector a person who is delegated with the task of choosing players for a cricket team. Typically the term is used in the context of player selection for national, provincial and other representative teams at the professional levels of the game, where a "panel of selectors" acts under the authority of the relevant national or provincial cricket administrative body.

Session A period of play, from start to lunch, lunch to tea and tea until stumps. Shepherd the strike also farm the strike of a batsman, contrive to receive the majority of the balls bowled, often to protect a weaker batting partner. Shooter a delivery that skids after pitching i. Short-pitched a delivery that bounces relatively close to the bowler. The intent is to make the ball bounce well above waist height a bouncer.

A slow or low-bouncing short-pitched ball is known as a long hop. Shot the act of the batsman hitting the ball with his bat. Side on 1. A side on bowler has back foot, chest and hips aligned towards the batsman at the instant of back foot contact. A batsman is side on if his hips and shoulders are facing at ninety degrees to the bowler. Sightscreen a large board placed behind the bowler, beyond the boundary, used to provide contrast to the ball, thereby aiding the striker in seeing the ball when it is delivered.

Typically coloured white to contrast a red ball, or black to contrast a white ball. Silly a modifier to the names of some fielding positions to denote that they are unusually close to the batsman, most often silly mid-off, silly mid-on, silly midwicket and silly point. Single a run scored by the batsmen physically running once only between the wickets. Six or Sixer a shot which passes over the boundary without having bounced, so called because it scores six runs to the batting side.

Sitter an easy catch or occasionally a stumping that should generally be taken. Skier pronounced Sky-er A mis-timed shot hit almost straight up in the air, to the sky. Usually results in the batsman being caught out. Occasionally however the fielder positions himself perfectly to take the catch but misses it or drops it. Such an error is considered very embarrassing for the fielder. Skipper used synonymously with Captain Skyline alternative name for Manhattan.

Slash a cut, but played aggressively or possibly recklessly - a cut qv being a shot played square on the off side to a short-pitched delivery wide of off stump. Sledging verbal abuse in simple terms, or a psychological tactic in more complex terms. Used by cricketers both on and off the field to gain advantage of the opposition by frustrating them and breaking the concentration of the opposition.

Considered in some cricketing countries to be against the spirit of the game, although occasional sledging remains common. Slice a kind of cut shot played with the bat making an obtuse angle with the batsman. Slider a wrist spinner's delivery where backspin is put on the ball.

Slip a close fielder behind the batsman, next to the wicket-keeper on the off-side. There can be as many as four slips for a faster bowler. Also "in the slips", "at first slip" the positions occupied by such fielders. Slipper a player who specialises in fielding in the slips e. Slog overs the final 10 overs particularly the last five in an ODI match during which batsmen play aggressively scoring at a very high rate.

Slog sweep a sweep shot hit hard and in the air, over the same boundary as for a hook. Used exclusively against spin bowlers. Slogger a batsman who hits a lot of slogs. Slower ball a medium-pace delivery bowled by a fast bowler.

Designed to deceive the batsman into playing the ball too early and skying it to a fielder. Has several variations. Snick also edge a slight deviation of the ball off the edge of the bat. Snick-o-Meter a device used to measure the distinct sound generated when a batsman snicks the ball. The distinct sound is shown as a high spike like one generated by a seismograph during an earthquake on the Snick-o-Meter. Sometimes called snicko.

Specialist a player selected in the team primarily for a single skill, i. Such players can be described as specialist batsmen, specialist bowlers or specialist wicketkeepers. Spell 1. Spider Graph similar to a Wagon Wheel, where different coloured lines are drawn to where a batsman has hit the ball during his innings. This accumulates into a spider looking graph.

Each amount of runs, 1's, 2's etc. This can show which stroke s each batsman is dominant at eg. Matthew Hayden would have a strong down the ground graph with many 4's straight of the wicket. Spin bowling a style of bowling in which a spin bowler "spinner" attempts to deceive the batsman by imparting spin on the ball using either their fingers or their wrist.

Spin bowling is most effective when the ball is travelling relatively slowly, and so most spinners bowl at a pace between 40 and 55mph. Splice the joint between the handle and the blade of a bat; the weakest part of the bat. If the ball hits the splice it is likely to dolly up for an easy catch. Square 1.

Square-cut A Cut shot, played square, i. Stance also batting stance the posture of a batsman holding his bat when facing a delivery. Stand noun A synonym for partnership. Standing up position adopted by a Wicket-keeper, close to the stumps, when a slow or, occasionally, medium pace bowler is operating. Start a batsman is said to have a start when he successfully avoids being dismissed for very few runs; in Australia, this is generally understood to mean a score of twenty runs.

Steaming in a bowler taking a fast run-up to bowl is said to be steaming in. Sticky dog a drying wicket that is exceedingly difficult to bat on. Uncommon if not non-existent in recent years due to the routine covering of pitches. Sticky wicket a difficult wet pitch.

Stock bowler a bowler whose role is to restrict scoring rather than to take wickets. Usually called upon to bowl large amounts of overs at a miserly run rate while strike bowlers rest between spells or attempt to take wickets from the other end. Stock delivery also stock ball a bowler's standard delivery; the delivery a bowler bowls most frequently.

Bowlers usually have one stock delivery and one or more variation deliveries. Stodger a batsmen who makes it their job to defend and to score at a mediocre rate. This style is prone to derogatory comments but also compliments on resilience and technique. Straight bat the bat when held vertically, or when swung through a vertical arc Straight up-and-down pejorative term used to describe a fast or medium paced bowler who cannot swing or seam the ball. Strangle form of dismissal whereby a batsman, in trying to play a glance very fine to a leg-side ball, get's an inside edge which is caught by the wicket-keeper.

Street a pitch which is easy for batsmen and difficult for bowlers. Sometimes called a road, highway, and various other synonyms for street. Strike the position as batsman, as opposed to non striker. Draw no Bet — A market only given by the betting provider when there is the possibility of a draw Test Series.

There are only two possible outcomes in this market 1 or 2. If the game ends in a draw single bets on the match will be refunded whereas all up bets accumulator tickets remain valid at the odds of 1. Futures — Wagers placed on an event occurring in the future. For example, betting on the outcomes and winners of Twenty20 Big Bash Hedging — Placing wagers on the opposite side.

Usually done to safeguard the bet and to cut losses in case the original bet is lost. Highest Opening Partnership — The team which fields the opening partnership with the highest total of runs is the winner in this market. The favourite to win the match always has lower odds for its opening partnership. Man of the Match — The individual who produces the best performance in a cricket match is voted as the Man of the Match.

Most Match Sixes — Punters choose which of the two teams will hit the most sixes a shot which passes over or touches the boundary without having bounced or rolled. Most Run-Outs — The team which creates the most run-outs whilst fielding is the winner in this market. If both teams create the same number of run-outs whilst fielding the winning bet is X. Point Spread — A handicap, also known as head start, with which a stronger team is expected to defeat a weaker one. Given only for betting purposes.

Series Score — Betting on the correct score of Test Series matches. For example after the 2nd game of the series you can bet on six possible outcomes: , , , , , Team to Make Highest 1st 6 Overs — The team which scores the highest total of runs over the course of the first 6 overs wins the bet. To Win the Match — Which of the two teams will win the match home — 1 or away — 2. In Test matches you can also bet on the draw X. To Win Outright — When you are betting on the winner of a competition or series containing more than one match.

Top Match Batsman — The winning bet in this market is the batsman with the most runs in a match. Top Team Batsman — The winning bet in this market is the batsman with the most runs in a match, but only one of the teams is taken into consideration. Top Team Bowler — The bowler with the most wickets taken for his team is the top team bowler. If there are two or more bowlers with the same number of wickets taken then the winner is the one with the least number of runs conceded.

ASTON VILLA VS WEST BROM BETTING PREVIEW

Oddsmaker also linemaker : The person who sets the odds. Some people use it synonymous with "bookmaker" and often the same person will perform the role at a given book, but it can be separate if the oddsmaker is just setting the lines for the people who will eventually book the bets. Off the board : When a book or bookie has taken a bet down and is no longer accepting action or wagers on the game. This can happen if there is a late injury or some uncertainty regarding who will be participating.

Also used in prop bets. Parlay : A wager in which multiple teams are bet, either against the spread or on the money line. The more teams you bet, the greater the odds. Pick 'em : A game with no favorite or underdog. The point spread is zero, and the winner of the game is also the spread winner. Point spread or just "spread" : The number of points by which the supposed better team is favored over the underdog.

Proposition or prop bet : A special or exotic wager that's not normally on the betting board, such as which team will score first or how many yards a player will gain. Sometimes called a "game within a game. Push : When a result lands on the betting number and all wagers are refunded. For example, a 3-point favorite wins by exactly three points. Square : A casual gambler. Someone who typically isn't using sophisticated reasoning to make a wager. Steam : When a line is moving unusually fast.

It can be a result of a group or syndicate of bettors all getting their bets in at the same time. It can also occur when a respected handicapper gives a bet his followers all jump on, or based on people reacting to news such as an injury or weather conditions. Straight up : The expected outright winner of the money line in an event or game, not contingent on the point spread. Teaser : Betting multiple teams and adjusting the point spread in all the games in the bettor's favor.

All games have to be picked correctly to win the wager. Total : The perceived expected point, run or goal total in a game. For example, in a football game, if the total is 41 points, bettors can bet "over" or "under" on that perceived total. Tout service : a person or group of people who either sells or gives away picks on games or events. Underdog : The team that is expected to lose straight up.

You can either bet that the team will lose by less than the predicted amount ATS , or get better than even-money odds that it will win the game outright. Skip to navigation. Betting: Glossary of common terms. Kansas City Chiefs. Bucs equal bucks as U.

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Atlanta Falcons. Best individual betting seasons for every NBA team. However, with outright betting, you need the side to actually go on and win the tournament. Above we looked at outright betting and towards the end, we stressed the importance of the team actually going on to win it rather than just making the semis or being beaten in the final.

With most bookmakers, you can also bet on a team just making the final. In terms of the odds, backing a team to make the final rather than winning it outright, are generally half what they would be in comparison to win the tournament. For a batsman, hitting the ball for six is behind only getting to a fifty or a century in terms of the most satisfying experiences you can have.

Seeing the ball disappear into the stands as the fielders watch on helplessly is not only a big fillip to the batsman himself but also a big boost to the team as a whole as a six is obviously the maximum amount of runs you can get from a single delivery; no-balls excluded.

With most bookmakers, you can bet on which team will get the most sixes. A good way to research the market is to look at how many sixes the side concedes per match, as well as of course being aware of how many sixes they hit themselves, on average.

Customers playing this market should pay particular attention to which format the upcoming game will be played in. For example, the West Indies may not hit that many sixes compared to other teams when it comes to Test matches but when they play in T20s, the likes of Chris Gayle, Kieron Pollard, Andre Russell and Sunil Narine prefer to go big even if that means taking risks, rather than accumulating their runs through singles and twos. Meaning the Windies are normally a good bet in this market.

The opening partnership means the two openers; the batsmen who open the innings at the top of the order. The runs scored by the opening partnership are how many runs they get between them until one of them gets out, including any extras. So if Tendulkar got 30 runs, Ganguly got 20 and there were a further five runs in extras before one of the two got out, the opening partnership would be worth 55 runs.

Opening partnership betting is, therefore, trying to predict which of the two teams will put on the most runs before the first wicket falls. Winner FT betting, sometimes also known as match-winner betting or match odds betting, is quite simply betting on who will win a particular cricket match.

With two notable exceptions. In these circumstances, all bets on the winner FT market will be void. The second exception is where the match ends in a tie not to be confused with a draw, see below. In some cases, teams will play a Super Over- as famously happened in the final of the World Cup- and the winner of the Super Over is declared the winner and the winner FT betting market will be settled accordingly. Ahead of a Super Over, each team nominates three batsmen to face one over.

In other words, a team can use a maximum of three batsmen in a Super Over- the two openers - and one more who comes in at the fall of the first wicket. The opposition then has to try to chase that total the same way they would in any other limited-overs match but again, only have one Over in which to do it.

In a bid to rectify that happening again, the likes of the Big Bash organisers have decided that a second Super Over will be played in the event of a tied Super Over and any more Super Overs that are needed until an actual winner is found. Duckworth-Lewis-Stern DLS aims to find a fair target for the side batting second by trying to reach a score with a reduced number of overs that would be as difficult to chase as it would have been if they had batted the full allocation of overs.

After each over under DLS, the target score is adjusted based on how many overs there are left and how many wickets the team batting still has in hand. That means that if the rain arrives during the second innings, everyone will always know if the team is ahead or behind the DLS total at any given moment. So, if the game came to a permanent halt because it was raining too much, India would either be behind the DLS score when the match was called off and lose it or ahead of the DLS score and win it when the Umpires stopped the game.

Frequent loss of wickets during a DLS-adjusted target, tend to make the target rise very quickly. Decimal odds betting is the form of displaying odds that are used in online betting in India and most European countries as well. The key thing to remember with decimal odds is that 2. Decimal odds tend to be preferred to the traditional fractional odds for two main reasons. The first is that the odds themselves are easier to understand than fractional odds. Secondly, decimal odds already have your stake built into them.

So if you backed Sri Lanka at 2. These days any betting company worth its salt will offer live betting, sometimes also known as in-play or in-running betting. Live betting means betting on a cricket match after it has already started. The idea behind live betting is that customers have the chance to watch the game and draw their conclusions rather than having to place all their bets before a ball has even been bowled. The odds-compilers at the betting company are constantly changing the odds based on the state of play in the game so customers need to be aware that the odds at one given moment might have changed thirty seconds later if something significant happened in the meanwhile, like a boundary being scored or a wicket falling.

Most of the time live betting is offered until the very last ball of the match, with tight run chases in limited-overs matches leading to particularly volatile betting heats where one team is favourite and then just a couple of minutes later, the other team has gone favourite. Any cricket match starts with one team batting the first time around. In Test matches, teams normally bat twice, while in limited-overs games they only ever bat once excluding Super Overs, of course.

At the start of the innings, the betting company may decide that they think India will score roughly The 0. In live betting, the innings runs betting line is constantly changing. So in the example above, maybe the lines would be runs or under, and runs or over. A par score is the number of runs that a team is expected to score when batting first. Bangalore is famous for having a good batting wicket and small boundaries so the commentators, analysts and captains may declare that is a par score.

The reason commentators love talking about a par score is that it gives a good indication of how well the team batting first has batted and how difficult the task of chasing is for the team batting second. Betting value means being offered odds that are more generous than what they should be.

The simplest possible example of that would be if someone offered you odds of 2. In both cases, the true odds should be 2. As are those of someone being a top batsman. Still, if Virat Kohli was available at odds of 3. But if a bookmaker offered you odds of 5. Value is important because it ensures that if you have a winning bet, you get paid out more than you probably should have.

A dead-heat is when two or more outcomes in a market end up tied. The best example of this would be in a top batsman betting market. So Stokes and Root would be dead-heated. When a bet is dead-heated between two different outcomes, you get paid out at half the odds or the full odds for half your stake, which comes to the same thing. In the top bowler betting market where if two players have the same number of wickets, it goes down to the number of runs conceded. Double chance betting means that rather than having just the one outcome going for you, you have two.

The best example of this would be in a Test match, where there are three outcomes: Team A, Team B and the draw. You might decide that India have the weapons to deny Australia and that the best bet is to go with either an India win or a draw, especially if India are lucky enough to win the toss and bat first. From time to time betting companies may decide to reward a customer with a cricket betting bonus for being loyal and doing their betting with that Sportsbook rather than another one.

A common form of cricket betting bonus is to give a customer a free bet. If the free bet wins, the customers get to keep the winnings generally not the stake as well although they may have to fulfil certain wagering requirements i. Another form of a cricket betting bonus might be to give a customer extra money when they make their next deposit or to give them higher odds than usual as a one-off, on a particular outcome.

Combo betting is wagering on more than one outcome within the same bet. In normal circumstances, cricket bettors will place just one bet, known as a single, and it either wins or loses or is void or dead-heated, in rare cases. Or betting on the Windies to score over runs against England, is also a single. A good example of combo betting is when there are two matches on the same day in the IPL. The good news is the odds o the two teams are multiplied by one another. So if Mumbai are 1. The bad news is that you need both parts of the bet to win for you to have a winning combo.

You could bet that Rohit Sharma top-scored for Mumbai in the first match and that Kolkata scored over runs batting first in the second match. Nor do you have to limit your combos to just two selections; you can have five or six different selections in your combo if you wish. The term hedging comes from the financial world where it means doing the opposite of what you originally did.

So for example, you might gamble that the US dollar will go up and then when it does, you then bet that it will go down, with the difference between the two bets securing you a profit. In cricket betting, hedging can apply to both the bookmaker and the customer. An example of a bookmaker hedging a bet would be if they took a very large bet from a customer and then hedged the same bet with another bookmaker to reduce their liability.

A customer may hedge their bet as a way of making sure that the win at least something after having placed a good bet to start with. Any cricket match officially starts the moment the toss is held. Both captains go out to the middle and a match referee or commentator will conduct the toss, where the captain who calls correctly decides whether he wants to bat first or field first.

Win the toss betting is quite simply, wagering on which team will…win the toss. Not only that but win the toss betting should have odds of 2. Some betting companies take it a step further and have four runners rather than two, adding what the captain who wins the toss will do to the equation. So rather than the market being just: India to win the toss and South Africa to win the toss, it would be: India win and bat, India win and bowl, South Africa win and bat, South Africa win and bowl.

Ahead of any major tournament, like a World Cup or the IPL, bookmakers will offer odds not just on who will win the tournament or but also who will be the batsman scoring the most runs but also the bowler taking the most wickets.

For example, when Rohit Sharma was top batsman at the Cricket World Cup, he was available at odds of around So if Sharma gets a century in his first match his odds will shorten, whereas if Virat Kohli gets out for just 10 in his first match, his odds will lengthen.

Not all batsman betting is about which player scores the most runs. Bookmakers also offer odds on exactly how many runs a particular batsman may score in their innings. For example, if the Mumbai Indians are playing the Delhi Capitals, bookmakers may decide that they think Quinton de Kock will score roughly In other cases, they might make it a three-runner market and offer more options. For example, it might be: de Kock 30 runs or less, runs, 41 runs or more. A betting stake is how much you wager on a particular bet.

Most bookmakers have a minimum and maximum stake per bet. In general, a new customer should expect to have a lower maximum stake allowed than a loyal customer who has been betting with that bookmaker for a while. When you see odds offered about any event, ranging from the winner of a cricket match to how many sixes will be scored in any given game, the odds are set by someone called an odds-compiler.

After doing all this research, the odds-compiler may decide that India deserve to be 1. Odds-compilers are also responsible for offering ever-changing odds during a match through live betting. Short for Umpire Decision Review System, DRS involves using technology to rectify blatant umpiring mistakes in an attempt to make the game as fair and error-free as possible from an umpiring point of view.

It can also happen the other way. If they use DRS and are shown to be wrong, they lose their review. But if they use it and are proved to be right or the decision is marginal, then they get to keep their review. Log in.